Person:Claude Askew (1)

Watchers
Claude Arthur Cary Askew
d.4-6 Oct 1917 At Sea
m. 11 Sep 1856
  1. Amy Ellen Cary Askew1857 -
  2. Isabel Emily Florence Askew1858 - 1928
  3. Mabel Fanny Mary Askew1861 - 1941
  4. Hugh Henry John Percy Cary Askew1862 - 1949
  5. Claude Arthur Cary Askew1865 - 1917
m. 10 Jul 1900
  1. Lt-Cdr. Geoffrey Hugh Cary Askew, R.N.1901 - 1962
  2. Joan Dorothy Askew1903 - 1928
  3. Gilian Margaret Askew1916 - 2013
Facts and Events
Name[1][3] Claude Arthur Cary Askew
Gender Male
Birth[1][2] 27 Nov 1865 Kensington, Middlesex, EnglandNo. 4 Holland Park
Christening? NOTE: One may presume that Claude – son and grandson of clergymen – was christened. I just haven’t found the record of it yet. —R.C.A. (Robinca)
Census[8] 2 Apr 1871 Kensington, Middlesex, England4 Holland Park, Claude Askew, aged 5 “scholar” (at home) with both parents, his three older sisters: Amy aged 13, Isabel 12, Mabel 10, and his elder brother: Hugh 8.
Residence[9][10] abt 1874—abt 1881 Richmond upon Thames, Surrey, EnglandEllerker House – "Sometime in or just before 1874 the family moved from Holland Park, Notting Hill to Ellerker House in Richmond."
Education[11] 1879–1883 Eton, Buckinghamshire, EnglandEton College. Claude Askew was an ‘Oppidan’ (non-scholarship pupil) in Rev. Charles James' House. He entered in September 1879 and left in July 1883.
Census[12] 3 Apr 1881 Eton, Buckinghamshire, England(boarding in Rev. Charles C. James’ house ‘The Timbralls’) - 'aged 15'
Residence[12] 1890 Westminster, London, EnglandMowbray house, Norfolk street, Strand WC
Education[13] abt 1891 – abt 1893 Southwark, London, EnglandGuy's Hospital - after he had left Eton, Claude went on to study medicine. Though it appears he never actually obtained a medical degree, The Times newspaper did report on his examination results from the 'Royal Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons' between September of 1891 and October of 1893.
Census[14] 5 April 1891 Paddington, Middlesex, England42 Albion St - 'aged 25 ... living on own means'
Marriage 10 Jul 1900 Paddington, Middlesex, EnglandChrist Church, Lancaster Gate
to Alice Jane de Courcy Leake
Census[15] 31 March 1901 Paddington, London, England3 Westbourne Street, near Hyde Park - 'aged 35' - with his wife, Alice (aged 26) and her widowed mother, Jane Leake née Dashwood (aged 56) and her brother, Henry Dashwood Stucley Leake (aged 25)
Residence[17] 12 Apr 1901 St. Marylebone, London, England4D Hyde Park Mansions together with his wife Alice and their newborn first child and only son, Geoffrey, born here on 12 April, 1901. Note: And they must have just moved there less than 12 days earlier - as at the time of that year's census (31 March, 1901), they were living at the house of Alice's widowed mother and brother - No. 3 Westbourne Street, near Hyde Park. S15
Residence[18] 5 July 1903 St. Marylebone, London, England11b. Oxford and Cambridge Mansions - Note: We learn this from the birth of his daughter Joan, on 5 July 1903, that the family was then living at 11b Oxford and Cambridge Mansions, where Joan was born. S18 "Built in 1885, the Hyde Park, Oxford and Cambridge mansions are some of the capital’s most enduring examples of Victorian architecture." S19
Residence[20] 1905 St. Marylebone, London, England11b. Oxford and Cambridge Mansions - which have also been described as "Aristocratic flats" - and as such may have added to their appeal for the Askews. However - and especially now with their two young children - they may not have appreciated it so much when they learned that children were apparently discouraged in the building. S21 And this might have contributed to Claude and Alice Askew deciding to move yet again a few years' later - sometime within the next five years. [See next]
Residence[22] 1910 St. Marylebone, London, England2H Portman Mansions (corner of Porter Street and Chiltern Street, where front entrance), just off Marylebone Road. Note: So the family has moved again to these newer premises ("built between 1890 and 1900"). But although nowadays described as being "more pompous and humourless than the average block of Victorian mansion flats" a couple of details on the roof may well have appealed to Claude: "... look at the skyline and see the lively little monkey that Saxon Snell has placed on the corner of Chiltern Street and Porter Street, gibbering at the dignified line of dragons on the gables over the road. And at the end of the block, who should be crouching on the party wall but Quasimodo, the Hunchback of Notre Dame, clutching to the parapet with both hands and feet, shouting incomprehensible defiance at the crowd below, who never so much as notice." S23
Census[24] 2-3 April 1911 Elstead, Surrey, EnglandBridge House - 'aged 45 ... author' - with his wife, Alice (aged 36), their two children, Geoffrey (aged 9) and Joan (aged 7), as well as Alice's widowed mother, Jane Leake née Dashwood (aged 66)
Death[3][4][5][6][7] 4-6 Oct 1917 At SeaMediterranean Sea – together with his wife "... drowned in the Ionian Sea off the Greek island of Paxos, after the Italian steamer Città di Bari, in which they were travelling together from Taranto in southern Italy, on their way to Corfu, was torpedoed by an enemy submarine and sank during the night of October 5-6 (or possibly the 4th), 1917...." —R.C.A. (Robinca)

Alice and Claude Askew - a biography

Image Gallery
References
  1. 1.0 1.1 Claude Arthur Cary Askew, in 'Certified Copy of an Entry of Birth' - Given at the General Register Office.

    General Register Office (GRO) – Certified Copy of an Entry of Birth – registered 1 Jan, 1866 > Registration District: Kensington / Birth in the Sub-district of Kensington Town in the County of Middlesex / « No: 336 | Twenty Seventh November 1866 4 Holland Park | Claude Arthur Cary | Boy | John Askew | Fanny Georgiana Charlotte Askew formerly Browne | Clerk in Holy Orders | John Askew Father 4 Holland Park Kensington | First January 1866 | C R Barnes Registrar »
    Copy issued 31 Aug, 2004.

  2. The Times, Saturday, Dec 02, 1865, p. 1, Issue 25358, col A – BIRTHS.

    « On the 27th Nov., at 4, Holland-park, Notting-hill, the wife of the Rev. J. ASKEW, of a son. »
    Accessed from: The Times Archive.

  3. 3.0 3.1 Major Claude Arthur Cary Askew and Mrs. Askew, in Obituaries in The Times, 15 Oct 1917, p. 11 (clipping): MAJOR AND MRS. ASKEW DROWNED AT SEA. AUTHORS OF "THE SHULAMITE".

    « A large public. which has enjoyed their numerous works of fiction will learn with regret of the death, by drowning in the Mediterranean, of Major Claude Arthur Cary Askew and Mrs. Askew. Their vessel was attacked by a submarine on October 5. Major and Mrs. Askew were industrious literary partners, who since their first book, "The Shulamite," which came out in 1904 and was dramatized and produced at the Savoy two years afterwards, had written, always in collaboration, a large number of popular novels and serial stories. They were married in 1900, Mrs. Askew being Alice, the eldest surviving daughter of the late Colonel Henry Leake, of the 44th and 70th Regiments. Both had been in Serbia during the war, Major Askew being attached to the Serbian Army, and their book "The Stricken Land," which was published a little more than a year ago is a vivid account of their adventures and the hardships which they shared with the Serbian Army on its retreat from Prishtina to Alessio. The authors had spent some six months in Serbia before the retreat, and wrote with sympathy and real knowledge of Serbia and the Serbian character. They are survived by two children. »
    NOTE: There were actually three children. The youngest had been born just a little over a year before their deaths – and while they were only briefly back in England during the war – which may have accounted for this oversight. And it is possibly this obituary from The Times, which may have caused later publications to have repeated the error – e.g. Edwardian Fiction – an Oxford Companion, published by the Oxford University Press in 1997.
    This newspaper clipping was amongst the documents, papers and photographs I received from my aunt Jill Askew in 2008. —R.C.A. (Robinca) It may also be accessed from The Times Archive.

  4. Major and Mrs. Claude Askew, in Daily Express, 16 Oct 1917, p. unknown (clipping): ALICE AND CLAUDE ASKEW. TRAGIC DEATH OF FAMOUS NOVELISTS. IN A TORPEDOED SHIP.

    « Many people will feel a sense of personal loss on learning of the tragic fate of Major and Mrs. Claude Askew, who are reported to have been drowned in a torpedoed vessel in the Mediterranean on October 5. / Everybody knew the Askews as novelists whose collaboration resulted in a tremendous popularity for their work, and readers of the 'Daily Express' will remember also their recent vivid accounts of events in Serbia, and their record of the heroism of the Serbian army. / Mr. and Mrs. Askew were in an Italian ship on their way to Corfu, the headquarters of their relief work among the Serbians, when the steamer was torpedoed. / The first news of the tragedy came in a telegram to their son Geoffrey, who until a few weeks ago was a naval cadet at Dartmouth College. He had left Dartmouth, however, and may not have heard the news yet, as his ship is believed to be cruising somewhere in the Mediterranean, possibly near the scene of his parents’ death. .... »
    This newspaper clipping was amongst the documents, papers and photographs I received from my aunt Jill Askew in 2008. —R.C.A. (Robinca)

  5. Major and Mrs. Claude Askew, in Daily Express, 18 Oct 1917, p. unknown (clipping): ALICE AND CLAUDE ASKEW. RESCUED FROM RAFTS TO DIE OF EXHAUSTION.

    « Further particulars of the deaths of Major and Mrs. Claude Askew, the famous novelists, who were special correspondents of the ‘Daily Express’, reached London yesterday. / Major Askew and his wife were on board the Italian steamer Bari, which was torpedoed by a German submarine off the Ionian Islands at 4 a.m. on October 6. The lifeboats belonging to the vessel were fired upon from the submarine and sank, but both Mr. and Mrs. Askew were able to find places on rafts, though not on the same raft. / The survivors on the rafts were picked up late on the afternoon of October 6 by a British steamer, but, in spite of all efforts of their rescuers, husband and wife both succumbed to the effects of extreme exhaustion. It is believed that their bodies were taken to Gallipoli, Italy, where 120 survivors are said to have landed. »
    This newspaper clipping was amongst the documents, papers and photographs I received from my aunt Jill Askew in 2008. —R.C.A. (Robinca)

  6. Mrs (Alice) Askew, in Daily Express, probably in Nov 1917, p. unknown (clipping): MRS. ASKEW’S DEATH. ENEMY’S REVOLTING BRUTALITY. (FROM OUR ROME CORRESPONDENT.).

    « A gentleman who has seen the depositions of one of the survivors of the Citta di Bari, sunk under peculiarly revolting circumstances between the South Italian coast and Corfu last month, tells me that the crew of the submarine behaved with appalling brutality to a lady, supposed to have been Mrs. Askew, wife and collaborator of the well-known novelist, who was among those who perished. When the vessel sank Mrs. Askew was seen in the water wearing a lifebelt, and holding in her arms her pet dog, to which she was devotedly attached. The men of the submarine seeing this made for the unfortunate lady, snatched the dog from her, and then coolly allowed her to drown before their eyes. / Mrs. Askew before leaving Rome told one of her Serbian friends that she had a premonition that she would be drowned on that voyage. .... »
    NOTE: I am assuming that this clipping is from the Daily Express. It is difficult as both The Times and the Daily Express had virtually identical typefaces and separation lines – at least to my eyes. But, as I have been unable to find this article in a search of The Times Archive online, I am presuming it must have been in the Daily Express.
    This newspaper clipping was amongst the documents, papers and photographs I received from my aunt Jill Askew in 2008. —R.C.A. (Robinca)

  7. Città di Bari, in 'uboat.net' web site > Citta Di Bari.

    « Name: Citta Di Bari / Type: Passenger steamer / GRT: 1,489 tons / Country: Italian / Built: 1913 / Builder: Ansaldo, Armstrong & Co., Sestri Ponente / Operator: Soc. di Nav. a Vap. Puglia, Bari // Date: 4 Oct 1917 / U-boat: UB 48 (Wolfgang Steinbauer) / Loss type: Sunk / Position: about 37 miles from Paxo / Location: ___ / Route: Taranto & Gallipoli - Corfu / Cargo: passengers / Casualties: ___ » Accessed at: uboat.net > U-boat War in World War One > Ships hit during WWI > Citta Di Bari
    NOTE: See also: SM UB-48

  8. Claude Askew, in Ancestry.com: 1871 England Census [database on-line].

    1871 England Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Original data: Census Returns of England and Wales, 1871. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1871. Data imaged from the National Archives, London, England. > London > Kensington > Kensington Town > District 14 p. 4: ‘4 Holland Park’
    Accessed on: search.ancestry.co.uk/

  9. John Askew, in Crockford’s Clerical Directory for 1874, Seventh issue, London: Howard Cox, 10 Wellington Street, Strand, 1874
    p. 24.

    « ASKEW, John, Ellerker House, Richmond, S.W. —Em. Coll. Cam. B.A. 1828, M.A. 1831; ᵭ (deacon) 1830, ᵱ (priest) 1833. »
    Accessed on: Google Books books.google.co.uk/

  10. Rev. J. Askew, in Thorne, James, Handbook to the Environs of London, Part II, London: John Murray, Albermarle Street, 1876
    p. 500.

    RICHMOND « ... The eccentric castellated structure conspicuous on the right in descending the hill is Ellerker House (Rev. J. Askew), for many years the residence of the Hon. Mrs. Ellerker, sister of the Marchioness of Thomond, in whose time the grounds were very celebrated. »
    Accessed on: books.google.co.uk/
    See also:
    Photograph of Ellerker House - later 'Ellerker College', now 'Old Vicarage School' > Accessed on the Old Vicarage School website > About the School > History > 'The School's History': oldvicarage-richmond.co.uk/
    &
    Chancellor, Edwin Beresford: Historical Richmond, London: George Bell & Sons, York Street, Covent Garden / Richmond, Hiscoke & Son, ‘Library,’ Hill Street, 1885, p. 181 > « ‘Ellerker House,’ formerly the residence of the Honourable Mrs. Ellerker, who died in 1842, is an imposing castellated building in the extreme Gothic style of architecture, and although having every appearance of age about it, is a comparatively modern erection.» > Accessed on: books.google.co.uk/

  11. Claude Askew, in Askew, Alice & Claude, Aylmer Vance: Ghost-Seer, edited by Jack Adrian, with his introduction, Ash-Tree Press, Ashcroft, British Columbia, 1998, p. xi. (Jack Adrian’s Introduction).

    « ... The son of a country clergyman, Claude was sent to Eton (1879-1883), and there wrote a play in blank verse. His first paid work was a short story for Jerome K. Jerome's doomed twopenny weekly To-Day .... »
    NOTE: I also received an email, dated 9 Sep 2010, from Alexandra Churchill of the Eton College Roll of Honour project, in which she wrote: « ... I have Claude arriving at Eton in September 1879 and leaving in July 1883. He was in the Rev. Charles James' house which means that he was an "Oppidan" This is the name given to all of the boys who were not on Scholarships. .... »

  12. 12.0 12.1 Claude Askew , in Ancestry.com. London, England, City Directories, 1736-1943 [database on-line].

    « Name: Claude Askew / Residence Date: 1890 / Street address: Mowbray house, Norfolk street, Strand WC / Residence Place: London, England »
    Image: p.2243 COURT DIRECTORY, 1890 ART-ATK
    Accessed on 08/07/2019 at: ancestry.co.uk
    Source Citation
    London Metropolitan Archives; London, England; London City Directories
    Source Information
    Ancestry.com. London, England, City Directories, 1736-1943 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2018.
    Original data: London Directories held by the London Metropolitan Archives and Guildhall Library, London, England. Images produced by permission of the City of London Corporation.

  13. Claude A. C. Askew, in Ancestry.com: 1881 England Census [database on-line].

    1881 England Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. / Original data: Census Returns of England and Wales, 1881. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1881. / Data imaged from the National Archives, London, England. > Buckinghamshire > Eton > District 5a > p. 11: « Eton College, Slough Road, The Timbrells | Charles C. James | Head (of househould) | ... / ... / ... Claude A.C. Askew | (relation to head) Boarder | Unmarried | (age) 15 | Scholar | (where born) Middlesex London / .... »
    Accessed on: ancestry.co.uk/

  14. Claude A. C. Askew, in The Times - four notices in four separate editions from Sep 5, 1891 to Oct 14, 1893.

    Saturday, September 5, 1891, p.12 – ROYAL COLLEGES OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS >
    « The following gentlemen passed the first examination of the Board in Chemistry at the quarterly meeting of the examiners: Messrs. ... Claude A. C. Askew, of Guy's Hospital .... »
    Tuesday, March 8, 1892, p. 4– ROYAL COLLEGES OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS >
    « The following gentlemen passed the first examination of the in Meteria Medica and Pharmacy :— Messrs. ... Claude A. C. Askew, Guy's .... »
    Friday, April 29, 1892 p. 14 – ROYAL COLLEGES OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS >
    « The following gentlemen passed the first examination of The Board in elementary anatomy and elementary physiology :— Messrs. ... Claude A. C. Askew ... Guy’s Hospital .... »
    Saturday, October 14, 1893 p. 4 – ROYAL COLLEGES OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS >
    « The following gentlemen passed the second examination of the board in anatomy and physiology: —Messrs. ... Claude C. Askew, Guy's .... »
    All four of these notices were accessed from: The Times Archive.

  15. Claude Askew, in Ancestry.com. 1891 England Census;; [database on-line].

    Source Citation: Class: RG12; Piece: 14; Folio: 8; Page: 9; GSU Roll: 6095124.
    Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1891 England Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005. / Original data: Census Returns of England and Wales, 1891. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1891.
    > Accessed on: search.ancestry.co.uk/

  16.   Claude Askew, in Ancestry.com. 1901 England Census [database on-line].

    Postal Address: No. 3 Westbourne Street
    Source Citation: Class: RG13; Piece: 15; Folio: 78; Page: 21.
    Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1901 England Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005. / Original data: Census Returns of England and Wales, 1901. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives, 1901.
    NOTE: This mistakenly gives his place of birth as "Pembroke, Wales" - when actually he was born at: No. 4 Holland Park in Notting Hill, London.
    > Accessed on: search.ancestry.co.uk/

  17. Claude Arthur Cary Askew, his wife Alice Jane de Courcey Askew (formerly Leake) and newborn son Geoffrey Cary , in 'Certified Copy of an Entry of Birth' - Given at the General Register Office.

    Registration District: Marylebone / 1901 Birth in the Sub-district of Christ Church in the County of London.
    « No: 193 | When and where born: Twelfth April 1901 4D Hyde Park Mansions | Name, if any: Geoffrey Cary | Sex: Boy | Name and surname of father: Claude Arthur Cary Askew | Name, surname and maiden surname of mother: Alice Jane De Courcey Askew formerly Leake | Occupation of father: Of Independent Means | Signature, description and residence of informant: Claude A. C. Askew Father 4D Hyde Park Mansions Marylebone | When registered: Twenty third April 1901 | Signature of registrar: Hugh Stokes Deputy Registrar »
    Accessed on: a 'Certified Copy of an Entry of Birth' - Given at the General Register Office (GRO) under the Seal of the said Office, the 31st day of August 2004.

  18. Claude Cary Askew, his wife and newborn daughter, in London Daily Mail Newspaper Archives, Jul 10, 1903.

    Daily Mail, Friday, July 10, 1903 - front page - Births:
    « ASKEW.—On July 5, at 11b. Oxford and Cambridge mansions, the wife of Claude Cary Askew, of a daughter. »
    Accessed on 08/07/2019 at: newspaperarchive.com

  19.   Oxford and Cambridge Mansions, in Website > marble-arch.london/culture-blog — 'The Mansions near the Marylebone Flyover'.

    « Have you ever seen the striking red and white mansions flats on Cabbell Street and Old Marylebone Road in the Marble Arch district? Built in 1885, the Hyde Park, Oxford and Cambridge mansions are some of the capital’s most enduring examples of Victorian architecture. The buildings highlight a unique period in the nation’s history when the upper-middle class longed for expansive flats and substantial leases, but without the responsibilities of a house and access to porters to service the property. »
    Accessed on 08/07/2019 at marble-arch.london/culture-blog

  20. Claude Askew, in Ancestry.com. London, England, City Directories, 1736-1943 [database on-line].

    Post Office London Directory > 1905 Street Directory, p. 591
    « OXFORD AND CAMBRIDGE MANSIONS:— ... / 11 / ... / B Askew, Claude / .... »
    Accessed on 08/07/2019 at: ancestry.co.uk

  21.   Oxford and Cambridge Mansions, in John Spiers, ed.: Gissing and The City - Cultural Crisis and the Making of Books.

    « 'Aristocratic flats'
    Oxford and Cambridge Mansions also attracted some notable illustrations. The flats were erected in stages between 1879 and 1882, to be followed during 1883 and 1884 by the even more luxurious Hyde Park Mansions. (9) The Builder (44, 1883, p. 144) ... But The Builder certainly, if unintentionally, captured the pretentiousness and fussiness of decorative detail which made Oxford and Cambridge Mansions an appropriate home for the Carnabys. The 'workings' of the flats are best illustrated by some later plans, produced in the 1930s, which differentiate between 'drawing room', 'best bedroom' and what, by then, was a 'morning room' beyond the kitchen but which, in the 1880s, would have been the maid's bedroom (Figure 2.4). (11) In this way Eales had attempted to implement his ideas about segregating different activities and different classes, though he thought it preferable to exclude some people, such as children, altogether: "It was most disagreeable to be always meeting them on the stairs" (The Builder 46, 1884, p. 386). Fortunately, most residents of Oxford and Cambridge Mansions were childless, just like the Carnabys. Only 5 per cent of the Mansions' population were aged 0-9 in 1891, compared to 28 per cent of inhabitants in Farringdon Road Buildings. .... »
    Accessed on 08/07/2019 at: books.google.ca

  22. Claude Askew, in Ancestry.com. London, England, City Directories, 1736-1943 [database on-line].

    Post Office London Directory > 1910 Street Directory, p. 473
    « PORTNAM MANSIONS (W. Postal District):— ... / 2 / ... / H, Askew, Claude / .... »
    Accessed on 08/07/2019 at: ancestry.co.uk
    Source Citation
    London Metropolitan Archives; London, England; London City Directories
    Source Information
    Ancestry.com. London, England, City Directories, 1736-1943 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2018.
    Original data: London Directories held by the London Metropolitan Archives and Guildhall Library, London, England. Images produced by permission of the City of London Corporation.

  23.   Portman Mansions, in Website > ornamentalpassions.blogspot.com — "Devoted to the unexpected details that help to make life in the city worth living".

    « Few buildings are more pompous and humourless than the average block of Victorian mansion flats, and at ground level Portman Mansions in Marylebone look just as dull, redbrick and deadening as any. They were built between 1890 and 1900 by Henry Saxon Snell, an architect who usually specialised in workhouses and hospitals.
    But look at the skyline and see the lively little monkey that Saxon Snell has placed on the corner of Chiltern Street and Porter Street, gibbering at the dignified line of dragons on the gables over the road.
    And at the end of the block, who should be crouching on the party wall but Quasimodo, the Hunchback of Notre Dame, clutching to the parapet with both hands and feet, shouting incomprehensible defiance at the crowd below, who never so much as notice. »
    Accessed on at: ornamentalpassions.blogspot.com

  24. Claude Askew and family, in Ancestry.com: 1911 England Census [database on-line].

    Postal Address: Bridge House, Elstead, Godalming, Surrey
    Source Citation: Class: RG14; Piece: 3148; Schedule Number: 95.
    Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1911 England Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011. / Original data: Census Returns of England and Wales, 1911. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA), 1911.
    Accessed on: search.ancestry.co.uk/

  25.   Claude Askew.

    to be added later

  26.   Alice and Claude Askew, in Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - Alice & Claude Askew.
  27.   Alice and Claude Askew, in Askew, Alice; Askew, Claude: The Stricken Land: Serbia As We Saw It. London: Eveleigh Nash Company, 1916.