Person:David O'Killey (4)

David O'Killey
b.1645 Ireland
m. 1635
  1. David O'Killey1645 - 1697
m.
  1. Joseph O Killey1662 - 1694
  2. Elizabeth O'Killey1665 - 1732
  3. Sarah O'Killey1670 - 1715
  4. Jeremiah O'Killey1670 - 1728
  5. David O'Killey1672 - 1697
  6. John O'Killey1673 - 1693
  7. Benjamin O'KilleyEst 1675 - 1745
Facts and Events
Name David O'Killey
Alt Name[1] David O Killia
Alt Name[2] David O Killea
Gender Male
Birth[2] 1645 Ireland
Citizenship[3] 1657 Yarmouth, Plymouth ColonyIn 1657, David took the Oath of Fidelity at Yarmouth, in Plymouth Colony.
Marriage New Plymouth Colony, British Colonial Americato Jane Powell
Will[2] 10 Feb 1696/97 Yarmouth, Barnstable County, Province of Massachusetts Bay, British Colonial AmericaOn 10 February 1696/7, David signed his will: "To all people to whom these presents shall come, Know ye that I, David O'Killia, of Yarmouth in ye county of Barnstable in ye province of ye Massachusetts Bay in New England, being at this time weak in body, but of a disposing mind and memory, do this tenth day of February 1696/7 make and ordain this my last will and testament in manner and forms following. First, I bequeath my soul to God in Christ Jesus who gave it to me and my body after my decease to decent burial, and for that outward estate which ye Lord of his goodness hath given me, I dispose as followeth: viz: that first of all that all my debts which in right are due from me to any person whatsoever be in convenient time after my decease paid out of my estate. Item -- I give and bequeath to my son Jeremiah O'Killia two shillings. I do give unto my son Joseph O'Killia two shillings. I do give unto my son David O'Killia two shillings. I give unto my grandchild John O'Killia two shillings. I do give unto my daughter Elizabeth O'Killia my little chest and my great iron kettle, after my wife's decease. I give unto my daughter Sarah O'Killia my box and my two lesser iron kettles after my wife's decease. I do give unto my son Benjamin O'Killia my gun and my sword and my great chest after my decease. I do give unto my loving wife Jane and to my son Benjamin O'Killia my horse and my two oxen, and my cow and heifer, and all my sheep and swine equally between them. I do give unto my loving wife Jane my bed and bedding and bedstead and curtains and all ye moveables that are not above mentioned. I do give unto my son Benjamin O'Killia my own dwelling house and all my lands and meadows with all ye privileges belonging there unto after my wife's decease (or after her marriage if that my wife marry again) and all plow irons, and chains, and all iron tools that are left. And I to make and appoint my loving wife Jane O'Killia to be my sole executrix to perform this my last will and testament according to ye true meaning and intent hereof. In witness whereof I ye said David O'Killia, Senior, have hereunto set my hand and seal ye date above said. David O'Killia -- his mark and seal Signed and sealed in ye presence of us: Thomas Folland; William Baker, Senior; Isaac Perse."
Residence[2] Dennis, Barnstable, Massachusetts, United States
Death[2] 10 Feb 1697 Dennis, Barnstable, Massachusetts, United States
Probate[2] 16 Jul 1697 Yarmouth, Barnstable County, Massachusetts Bay Province, British Colonial AmericaOn 16 July 1697, an inventory of David's estate was presented: "An inventory of ye estate of David O'Killia of Yarmouth in ye County of Barnstable taken upon ye sixteenth day of July, one thousand six hundred ninety seven. two oxen, three cows, one horse -- 21-00-00 three sheep and one lamb and a half swine -- 00-18-06, 02-10-00 house, lands and meadows -- 40-00-00 a gun, and sword, powder and bullets -- 01-19-00 bed and bolsters, pillows, bedding, bedstead and curtains -- 06-00-00 trundle bed, bedding, linen wheel, etc. -- 02-05-00 a bed, bed clothing, an old saddle -- 02-11-00 a pair of looms, a spit, a dry caske -- 01-00-00 Indian corn and rye -- 01-08-6 four sickles, hoes, spade, two axes -- 01-02-06 iron trammels, coulter, tongs, fire slice -- 00-08-00 iron chains, hammer, shears, other iron -- 01-06-06 Plow share, bolt, caps and pin, one auger -- 00-07-06 frying pan, one chisle, box iron, pair of scales -- 00-06-09 pitch fork, sythe, etc. -- 00-07-00 an old cart, and wheels, yoke ring, etc. -- 01-00-00 great iron kettle, in brass, on sieve -- 00-07-00 an old caske, other lumber, in trays, spoons, etc.-- 01-03-00 a great spinning wheel, the rim of a wheel -- 00-04-06 pewter platters, earthen ware and tin -- 00-17-00 new cloth, one pair cards, two meal bags -- 01-14-00 2 chests, one box, one great table -- 01-01-00 wearing apparel, shoes, woolen and linen napkins -- 03-09-06 a looking glass, a grandstone, a cupboard -- 00-09-00 old chairs, a little table, flax and yarn -- 00-15-00 woolen yarn, linen yarn, sheeps wool -- 01-08-00 by us: Thomas Folland, Benjamin Matthews Benjamin O'Killia, son of David O'Killia, late of Yarmouth deceased, made oath to ye truth of this inventory before Barnabas Lothrop Esq. Judge of Probate within ye county of Barnstable July ye 19th: 1697.

David was probably born in Ireland, as records for Plymouth Colony refer to him as "the Irishman." Researchers have surmised that he was born in County Galway.

How he arrived on Cape Cod has not been discovered.

The introduction to "David O'Killia the Immigrant" by Eunice Kelley Randall:

Introduction [to "David O'Killia the Immigrant"]

A backward glance into the seventeenth century reminds one that there were great migrations of people from the British Isles to other parts of the world. These migrations consisted of various religious groups; Protestants, Catholics, and Non-Conformists. Had it not been so, there might have been no Cape Cod Kelleys. Since there were and are, we'll take a peep into the Past and that will answer the oft repeated 'why.'

Of the details concerning these migrations probably most of my readers are aware, but a generalization may help to give a better understanding of the background of our progenitor. War and aftermath of war, famine, pestilence, confiscation of property, industrial, educational and political interferences, trade restrictions, and religious intolerances all but annihilated the old order of living. The people were desperate and welcomed almost any possible means of escape.

Thousands of soldiers separated from their wives and families were transported to European countries, there to serve in France, Germany, Spain and Venice. Many of the bereft and destitute were also transported to the Barbadoes and probably other islands and condemned to servitude.

There were those classified as gentlemen who had become discouraged and dissatisfied with prevailing conditions, and sold their estates, desirous of trying to better their fortunes in a new country.

A much larger class of emigrants was transported, however, who were known as "servants." The term applied not only to domestics but also those who earned their livelihood by manual labor. Among them were tradesmen, mariners, mechanics, husbandmen and some times teachers and manufacturers.

The methods and means used in acquiring potential passengers were sometimes by despicable enticing, bribing and kidnapping devices. The servants who were unable to advance pay for their passage were indentured for a term of service, varying from three to ten years depending upon the mood of the master. Even the gentlemen sometimes proved to be victims of unscrupulous captains.

Having secured their passage their troubles continued -- poor and scanty food, scarcity of water, very close quarters, prolonged voyages and other factors invited sickness, starvation and death. This gave the wicked captains ample opportunity for looting their victims, of which they freely availed themselves.

In "Barnstable Families" there is a true and tragic tale (of which no doubt there are many) of the Delap Family of which only one boy about fourteen years of age survived the passage. Later he married into the Kelley Family.

Some of these piratical captains were brought to justice, tried, convicted and hanged but that did not atone for their cruelty.

Perhaps our David was among one of these groups. There is nothing to my knowledge that is authentic regarding his parentage or residence prior to his entry on the Cape.

Tradition has played an interesting role in this particular history, and there is a tale which has been handed down in our family for generations. It has been told and retold, and in as much as all tradition is partially based on fact, I am inclined to believe there may be some truth in this tale, at least, until it is proven to the contrary.

Many years ago my grandmother and aunt were visiting on the Cape, and there the tale was told to them, and here it is versified by the aunt.

Our Sire O'Kelly

They sailed away from Ireland A family of three. Leaving the old home for a new On the other side of the sea.

But the father and mother died on the way And the lad was left alone. And the wealth they had brought from Ireland The captain sought for his own

So coming on to New England He set the lad ashore, Where lies the Cape an armlike shape Wave beaten ever more

How long he wandered lonely Stung by the keen sea blast, I cannot tell -- I only know The lad found friends at last.

As for the cruel captain For awhile in his way went he. Going from crime to crime till he came At last to the gallows tree.

The lad grew up, he lived his life Then walked no more with men. Generation upon generation Has passed away since then.

And many now are his children, And many the names they own, They are scattered abroad as seeds Which varying winds have sown.

Through city, and village and farmlands A-near and far away, But some to that early dwelling place Cling to this very day.

'Twas there I heard the story told By lips now under the sod. Of how our Sire O'Kelley Was landed on Cape Cod.

But we do know that on October 4, 1655 he was recorded in Plymouth County as David O'Gillior (the clerk's best spelling) the "Irishman," servant to Edward Sturges. We also know that he was here prior to that date as an indentured servant to John Darby of Yarmouth. In the inventory of Darby's will it is stated that he died indebted to David. The indenture seems to have been transferred to Edward Sturges.

Evidently his period of indentureship expired in or prior to 1657, for he and others then took the oath of fidelity and were admitted as inhabitants of Yarmouth with the right to vote in town affairs. He was then recorded as David O'Kelly, "the Irishman."

William Swift, a well-to-do Quaker of Sandwich at one time had been served by our David. Another employee of his was a Welsh Quaker maid by the name of Jane Powell. It has been recorded that she met David at the well whither she had gone for water. Maybe this was the trysting place. The meeting budded into a romance, and blossomed into a fruitful union, the stalwart Irishman and the Welsh Quaker maid.

To a farm containing about one hundred acres called Kelley's Point, bounded on one side by Kelley's Bay, an estuary of Bass River, David brought his bride. The farm consisted of cleared land, pasture, salt marshes, and woodland, with Bass River nearby teeming with codfish and herring. This seemed like an ideal location for farming and fishing, to which, in all probability David and his sons applied themselves.

One of the nearest neighbors was Francis Baker, an early English immigrant. He had married Isabel Twining, a Quaker, and they were parents of eight children, six boys and two girls.

It was in these surroundings that David and Jane lived for over forty years, rearing their family of seven, five boys and two girls. The children became allied with old Plymouth Colony families, and among their descendants you will find people of prominence who will be mentioned later. Of Joseph(2) there is no record, but we know he lived for he was remembered in his father's will. Sarah was unmarried as is shown by her will. It is interesting to note that she was remembered in John Crowe's will. The rest of the children of whom there are records all married and all had families excepting Elizabeth.

In 1676, David O'Kelia (as the name was then written) was taxed 2 pounds, 6 shillings, and 9 pence as his share toward the cost of the late war (King Philip's).

An authority on local history informs us that he was prominent and active in the community, and with his passing Yarmouth lost a very faithful and worthwhile citizen.

His will dated February 10, 1696 was probated July 19, 1697, the legatees of which were his wife, his sons and daughters. His widow passed on in 1711, and she is written of as being a woman of strong character.

There have been many Quaker descendants even to the present day, and who can say what her influence has brought to bear. How David felt we do not know but trust that he was in accord.

They have long since gone to their reward and perhaps are resting in the little old Quaker Burying Ground in "Mayfair," South Dennis.

Four stone corner posts are all that remain of the formerly fenced enclosure. In the plot almost overgrown with natural shrubbery and trees, there are to be seen a few simple white stones with Kelley markings, and a considerable number of plainly visible mounds.

The little old meeting house was built nearby in or about 1714. There the Friends worshipped for a number of years, when they became desirous of repairing or rebuilding. The project was started, and in spite of obstacles was finally completed.

In 1807, the meeting house was moved across Bass River to South Yarmouth. There meetings were held till 1809, when a new meeting house was built on a lot of land donated by David(4) Kelley. That building is standing today in an excellent state of preservation.

After the turn of this century the meeting house was closed when membership had declined to one or two. Within recent years, however, the house has been reopened and services are held there regularly. The last I attended, a group of twenty or more had assembled.

In the well-kept cemetery, adjoining, there are many rows of simple white stones marking the resting places of departed Friends, many of which bear the Kelley name.

Across the river, in the present town of Dennis is the site of the original Kelley Homestead, an open lot near the road, which today shows little sign of habitation. A pit, an old cellar and a few old pear trees bear the only reminder of life.

But the memories of the former occupants will inspire and encourage us their descendants to carry on, trusting that we, too, may be counted among the faithful ones three hundred years from now.


David and family resided in what was called "Old Yarmouth," near the head of Follin's Pond. The area is now called Mayfair and is part of the town of Dennis.

David signed his will on 10 February, 1696/7.

       "To all people to whom these presents shall come, Know ye that I, David O'Killia, of Yarmouth in ye county of Barnstable in ye province of ye Massachusetts Bay in New England, being at this time weak in body, but of a disposing mind and memory, do this tenth day of February 1696/7 make and ordain this my last will and testament in manner and forms following.  First, I bequeath my soul to God in Christ Jesus who gave it to me and my body after my decease to decent burial, and for that outward estate which ye Lord of his goodness hath given me, I dispose as followeth: viz: that first of all that all my debts which in right are due from me to any person whatsoever be in convenient time after my decease paid out of my estate.  Item -- I give and bequeath to my son Jeremiah O'Killia two shillings.  I do give unto my son Joseph O'Killia two shillings.  I do give unto my son David O'Killia two shillings.  I give unto my grandchild John O'Killia two shillings.  I do give unto my daughter Elizabeth O'Killia my little chest and my great iron kettle, after my wife's decease.  I give unto my daughter Sarah O'Killia my box and my two lesser iron kettles after my wife's decease.  I do give unto my son Benjamin O'Killia my gun and my sword and my great chest after my decease.  I do give unto my loving wife Jane and to my son Benjamin O'Killia my horse and my two oxen, and my cow and heifer, and all my sheep and swine equally between them.  I do give unto my loving wife Jane my bed and bedding and bedstead and curtains and all ye moveables that are not above mentioned.  I do give unto my son Benjamin O'Killia my own dwelling house and all my lands and meadows with all ye privileges belonging there unto after my wife's decease (or after her marriage if that my wife marry again) and all plow irons, and chains, and all iron tools that are left.  And I to make and appoint my loving wife Jane O'Killia to be my sole executrix to perform this my last will and testament according to ye true meaning and intent hereof.  In witness whereof I ye said David O'Killia, Senior, have hereunto set my hand and seal ye date above said.
  David O'Killia -- his mark and seal
  Signed and sealed in ye presence of us: Thomas Folland; William Baker, Senior; Isaac Perse."
    [from Barnstable County Probate Records, Volume 2, page 56] 

An inventory of his estate was presented on 16 July, 1697. "The Inventory of David O'Killia"

  "An inventory of ye estate of David O'Killia of Yarmouth in ye County of Barnstable taken upon ye sixteenth day of July, one thousand six hundred ninety seven.

two oxen, three cows, one horse -- 21-00-00 three sheep and one lamb and a half swine -- 00-18-06, 02-10-00 house, lands and meadows -- 40-00-00 a gun, and sword, powder and bullets -- 01-19-00 bed and bolsters, pillows, bedding, bedstead and curtains -- 06-00-00 trundle bed, bedding, linen wheel, etc. -- 02-05-00 a bed, bed clothing, an old saddle -- 02-11-00 a pair of looms, a spit, a dry caske -- 01-00-00 Indian corn and rye -- 01-08-6 four sickles, hoes, spade, two axes -- 01-02-06 iron trammels, coulter, tongs, fire slice -- 00-08-00 iron chains, hammer, shears, other iron -- 01-06-06 Plow share, bolt, caps and pin, one auger -- 00-07-06 frying pan, one chisle, box iron, pair of scales -- 00-06-09 pitch fork, sythe, etc. -- 00-07-00 an old cart, and wheels, yoke ring, etc. -- 01-00-00 great iron kettle, in brass, on sieve -- 00-07-00 an old caske, other lumber, in trays, spoons, etc.-- 01-03-00 a great spinning wheel, the rim of a wheel -- 00-04-06 pewter platters, earthen ware and tin -- 00-17-00 new cloth, one pair cards, two meal bags -- 01-14-00 2 chests, one box, one great table -- 01-01-00 wearing apparel, shoes, woolen and linen napkins -- 03-09-06 a looking glass, a grandstone, a cupboard -- 00-09-00 old chairs, a little table, flax and yarn -- 00-15-00 woolen yarn, linen yarn, sheeps wool -- 01-08-00 by us: Thomas Folland, Benjamin Matthews Benjamin O'Killia, son of David O'Killia, late of Yarmouth deceased, made oath to ye truth of this inventory before Barnabas Lothrop Esq. Judge of Probate within ye county of Barnstable July ye 19th: 1697.

    {from Barnstable County Probate Records, Volume 2, page 56]

Write to Ruth Swensen and ask her if she has more information on David O'Kelley. She gave this as a reference: Will--Mayflower Desc. Vol 23 p. 82.

References
  1. U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 (2)
    Source number: 33.000; Source type: Electronic Database; Number of Pages: 1; Submitter Code: LOS.

    Name: David O'Killia Birth Date: 1645 Birth Place: _FOOT: Yates Publishing, U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 (Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004.Original data - This unique collection of records was extracted from a variety of sources including family group sheets and electronic databases. Originally, the information was deriv), Source number: 33.000; Source type: Electronic Database; Number of Pages: 1; Submitter Code: LOS.Name: David O'KilliaBirth Date: 1645Birth Place:. _ABBR: Yates Publishing, U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 (Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004.Original data - This unique collection of records was extracted from a variety of sources including family group sheets and electronic databases. Originally, the information was deriv), Source number: 33.000; Source type: Electronic Database; Number of Pages: 1; Submitter Code: LOS.

  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 Randall, Eunice Kelley Gidley. David O'Killia the immigrant of Old Yarmouth, Massachusetts with his descendants and allied families, 1652-1962. (Dartmouth, Massachusetts: E.K.G. Randall, 1962)
    p. 19-22.

    "David O'Killea born in Ireland; died in Old Yarmouth, now Dennis, Massachusetts, 1697; married Jane Powell; [she] born in Wales; died Yaromoth, October 17, 1711. They resided in Old Yarmouth near the Head of Follin's Pond, presently a section of Dennis called "Mayfair".
    [p. 20] "To all people to whom these presents shall come, Know ye that I, David O'Killia, of Yarmouth in ye county of Barnstable in ye province of ye Massachusetts Bay in New England, being at this time weak in body, but of a disposing mind and memory, do this tenth day of February 1696/7 make and ordain this my last will and testament in manner and forms following. First, I bequeath my soul to God in Christ Jesus who gave it to me and my body after my decease to decent burial, and for that outward estate which ye Lord of his goodness hath given me, I dispose as followeth: viz: that first of all that all my debts which in right are due from me to any person whatsoever be in convenient time after my decease paid out of my estate. Item -- I give and bequeath to my son Jeremiah O'Killia two shillings. I do give unto my son Joseph O'Killia two shillings. I do give unto my son David O'Killia two shillings. I give unto my grandchild John O'Killia two shillings. I do give unto my daughter Elizabeth O'Killia my little chest and my great iron kettle, after my wife's decease. I give unto my daughter Sarah O'Killia my box and my two lesser iron kettles after my wife's decease. I do give unto my son Benjamin O'Killia my gun and my sword and my great chest after my decease. I do give unto my loving wife Jane and to my son Benjamin O'Killia my horse and my two oxen, and my cow and heifer, and all my sheep and swine equally between them. I do give unto my loving wife Jane my bed and bedding and bedstead and curtains and all ye moveables that are not above mentioned. I do give unto my son Benjamin O'Killia my own dwelling house and all my lands and meadows with all ye privileges belonging there unto after my wife's decease (or after her marriage if that my wife marry again) and all plow irons, and chains, and all iron tools that are left. And I to make and appoint my loving wife Jane O'Killia to be my sole executrix to perform this my last will and testament according to ye true meaning and intent hereof. In witness whereof I ye said David O'Killia, Senior, have hereunto set my hand and seal ye date above said.
    David O'Killia -- his mark and seal
    Signed and sealed in ye presence of us: Thomas Folland; William Baker, Senior; Isaac Perse." [From Barnstable County Probate Records, Volume 2, p. 56]
    {p. 21] The Inventory of David O'Killia: "An inventory of ye estate of David O'Killia of Yarmouth in ye County of Barnstable taken upon ye sixteenth day of July, one thousand six hundred ninety seven.
    two oxen, three cows, one horse -- 21-00-00
    three sheep and one lamb and a half swine -- 00-18-06, 02-10-00
    house, lands and meadows -- 40-00-00
    a gun, and sword, powder and bullets -- 01-19-00
    bed and bolsters, pillows, bedding, bedstead and curtains -- 06-00-00
    trundle bed, bedding, linen wheel, etc. -- 02-05-00
    a bed, bed clothing, an old saddle -- 02-11-00
    a pair of looms, a spit, a dry caske -- 01-00-00
    Indian corn and rye -- 01-08-6
    four sickles, hoes, spade, two axes -- 01-02-06
    iron trammels, coulter, tongs, fire slice -- 00-08-00
    iron chains, hammer, shears, other iron -- 01-06-06
    Plow share, bolt, caps and pin, one auger -- 00-07-06
    frying pan, one chisle, box iron, pair of scales -- 00-06-09
    pitch fork, sythe, etc. -- 00-07-00
    an old cart, and wheels, yoke ring, etc. -- 01-00-00
    great iron kettle, in brass, on sieve -- 00-07-00
    an old caske, other lumber, in trays, spoons, etc.-- 01-03-00
    a great spinning wheel, the rim of a wheel -- 00-04-06
    pewter platters, earthen ware and tin -- 00-17-00
    new cloth, one pair cards, two meal bags -- 01-14-00
    2 chests, one box, one great table -- 01-01-00
    wearing apparel, shoes, woolen and linen napkins -- 03-09-06
    a looking glass, a grandstone, a cupboard -- 00-09-00
    old chairs, a little table, flax and yarn -- 00-15-00
    woolen yarn, linen yarn, sheeps wool -- 01-08-00
    by us: Thomas Folland, Benjamin Matthews
    Benjamin O'Killia, son of David O'Killia, late of Yarmouth deceased, made oath to ye truth of this inventory before Barnabas Lothrop Esq. Judge of Probate within ye county of Barnstable July ye 19th: 1697." [from Barnstable Probate Records, Volume 2, page 58]

  3. Shurtleff, Nathaniel B. Records of Plymouth Colony: Births, Marriages, Deaths, Burials, and Other Records, 1633-1689. (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company)
    p. 186.

    "The Names of such of Yarmouth as tooke the Oath of Fidelitie in the Yeare 1657 ... David Okillia, Irishman"