Transcript:Will. John Jackson 26 Aug 1724

Watchers


In the name of God, Amen

The twenty sixth day of August in the year of our Lord, one thousand seven hundred and twenty four (1724)

I, JOHN JACKSON, of Hempstead, in Queens County, on Nassau Island in the Colony of New York Esq., being well in body, but of perfect mind and memory, and my understanding sound and good, thanks be given to God, therefore calling to mind the mortality of my body, and that it is appointed unto all men to die, do make and appoint this my last Will and Testament, that is to say; principally and first of all, I give and Recommend my soul into the hands of God that gave it, hoping through the merits, death and suffering and passion of my blessed God and Savior, Jesus Christ, to have full and free pardon of all my sins, and to inherit eternal life; and my body I commend to the Earth from whence it was taken, to be buried in a Christian and decent manner at the discretion of my Executors hereinafter named, nothing doubting but at the general resurrection, I shall receive the same again by the mighty power of God. And as touching such worldly estates wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me in this life withal.

I give, devise, bequeath and dispose of the same, in the following manner and form, that is to say, First, I will that all those debts, dues and duties that I do in right or conscience owe to any manner of person or persons whatsoever, shall be well and truly satisfied, contented and paid in some convenient time after my decease by my Executors hereinafter named.

I will and bequeath unto my son, Samuel Jackson, and to his heirs and assigns forever, the house and land that I now dwell upon at Jerusalem, beginning at the northwest corner of the land by the south side of the road that parts my land and the Deamanses (Seaman's?) tract of land, and so to run on the east side of the road that leads to the South till it cometh to the fence on the south side of my young orchard, and so to run easterly as the fence stands till it cometh to the fence that parts my son John Jackson's land and my land that I now dwell on, and thence to run east easterly as the fence stands, to the east end of it; and from thence to run a due east line to the eastermost end of my land; and then to run northward as the line of my land runs to the north side of it, and thence as the path goeth to the bounds first mentioned.

I also will and bequeath unto my son Samuel Jackson, and to his heirs and assigns forever, the land where his house standeth, bounded on the west by the road that leads to South, and south by land of Joshua Barnes, North by the fence as they now stand that parts my son John Jackson's land and my land that I now dwell on and then bequeathed to my son Samuel Jackson which piece of land shall extend so far eastward as far as to make both these pieces of land to contain the equal moiety, and helf part in quantity of my tract of land that lyeth in a body at Jerusalem. And my will is that my son John Jackson and his heirs and assigns shall maintain the fence that runneth north and south between them, from time to time at all times forever hereafter at his and their own and only costs and charges.

I will and bequeath unto my son John Jackson, to his heirs and assigns forever the tract of land where he dwelleth at Jerusalem, the bounds beginning at the southwest corner thereof, by the lands east bequeathed to my son Samuel Jackson and running Northward on the east side of the land that leads to South, till it cometh to the fence on the south side of my young orchard and so to run Easterly as the fence runneth till it cometh to the house that parts the lands joineth on  ?¹ and this land bequeathed to him, and then to run as that fence runs till it comes to the East end of it, and thence to run Southardly by the line on my land on the Eastward till the south side of it and then to run Westerdly by Joshua Barnes land so far as to run up to him, the equal half of my body or tract of land lying together in Jerusalem, leaving to Samuel's piece where his house now stands the breadth at east and as the range of fence will allow him to give up his half of my tract of land, and my son John Jackson and his heirs and assigns shall from time to time forever hereafter maintain the fence that runneth North and South from my young orchard at his own proper cost and charges.

I also will and bequeath unto my son John Jackson, and to his heirs and assigns forever all my three lots of meadow, and all the upland within the fence belonging to the right of upland in the half neck so called that belongeth to me, be it in quantity of acres more or less.

I also will and bequeath to my son John Jackson and to his heirs and assigns forever, one piece of land on the Great Neck above the Indian path or road across the Neck adjoining the Half Neck brook, containing twenty and four acres, that he hath already in his possession.

I also will and bequeath to my son John Jackson and to his heirs and assigns forever all my three lots and half lots of meadow that I have lying on the Great Neck to the Westward of the Parsonage lot of meadow, and bounded on the Westerly by the ditch and all the upland that lyeth above the said meadow to the Neck fence Westward of Ireland's path, my son John and his heirs and assigns, maintaining the fence next to the Lake of Ireland's path, but my will is that so long as my daughter Martha Titus doth live she shall have liberty to cut and carry off from year to year all the grass that doth grow below the creek westward of Ireland's path. And if it do or shall happen that I or my son Samuel, shall happen to have any corn or flax growing upon any of the lands willed to my son John at the time of my decease, my son Samuel shall have time and liberty to cut the corn and flax and carry all off before my son John shall have possession thereof, or any hay cut upon the meadow willed to my son John upon Great Neck, at the time of my decease, my son Samuel shall have liberty to carry it off.

I also will and bequeath unto my son John Jackson, and to his heirs and assigns forever, the equal half of that piece of land lying on the west side of the Great Neck above or Northward of the eight acre lot including my eight acre lot I bought of Peter Titus, and Southward of Joshua Barnes land, my son John to have the North end of the piece of land adjoining to Joshua's land.

I will and bequeath unto my son Samuel Jackson and to his heirs and assigns forever, all my meadow and upland that I have on the east of Great Neck, bounded on the west by the lot of meadow of the Parsonage and the upland bounded by Ireland's path, and Northward by the Neck, and Eastward by the Half Neck brook or creek, be the quantity of acres of upland meadow more or less.

I also will and bequeath to my son Samuel Jackson and to his heirs and assigns forever, all the parcel of land and meadow lying on the Great Neck Eastward of the eight acre lot and Westward of the path to the South, and also the equal half lying the south half of the piece of land above the eight acre lot that I bought of Peter Titus, also to be divided between John Jackson and my son Samuel Jackson.

I also will and bequeath unto my son Samuel Jackson and to his heirs and assigns forever, another piece of land lying on the East side of John Barnes homestead and Westward of the fifty acre lot, containing as by the card or draft thereof thirty and four acres and one hundred and forty eight rods, and also fifty acres of land lying between Jerusalem swamp and Bundsals swamp bounded East by Jerusalem brook and West by the brook in Burdsall's swamp and bounded on the North by Thomas Seaman's fence to run as Westward as his fence now stands and from the southwest corner of Thomas Seaman's fence to run a west line to Burdsall'e swamp or little meadow brook, and extending down Southward till it makes up fifty acres of land.

I will and bequeath to my son Samuel Jackson, and to his heirs and assigns forever, my house and barn and four acres lot in the Town plat of Hemstead and one lot of meadow he hath held in his possession already.

I also will and bequeath unto my son James Jackson and to his heirs and assigns forever, John Jews property right and blanck (sic) in the undivided lands of Hempstead.

I will and bequeath unto my son John Jackson and to his heirs and assigns forever, seventy and nine acres of land to be taken up on my rights in the Town of Hempstead, and also one hundred acres of land more to be taken up in the Township of Hempstead, upon my rights over what I Will to my other sons.

I will and bequeath unto my son James Jackson and to his heirs and assigns forever, one hundred and fifty six acres of land, to be taken up on my rights of land in the Township of Hempstead.

I will and bequeath unto my three sons, John Jackson, James Jackson and Samuel Jackson and to their heirs and assigns forever, all the remainder of my lands in the Township of Hempstead, both divided and undivided, and hollows on the planes, and ox pastures, goats in both ox pastures, to be equally divided between them and their heirs and assigns.

I will and bequeath unto my three sons, namely, John, James and Samuel Jackson be associated in the Patent of Hempstead, and do will and bequeath unto them and their heirs and assigns forever, all my right and title unto the Patent of Hempstead Aforesaid.

I will and bequeath unto my son Samuel Jackson my ox cart and wheels, ,and another cart and plow and tackeling and utensils of husbandry of what sort or kind soever and all my carpenter tools.

I will and bequeath unto my son John Jackson my horse cart and wheels and tackling and my log chains, and one plow.

I will and bequeath unto my three sons, John, James and Samuel Jackson, all my books and bonds to be equally divided amongst them. And my clothes all of them, I also will unto my three sons to be equally divided between them. I will and bequeath unto my son John Jackson my negro man named Peter.

I will and bequeath unto my son James Jackson, my negro boy called Billy, that he has in his possession.

I will and bequeath unto my son Samuel Jackson, my old negro man called Sambo, and my negro woman Betty, and my negro boy called Sampson.

I will and bequeath unto my son James Jackson, one pair of my best oxen.

I will and bequeath unto my daughter Elizabeth Doughty, my negro girl names Tenney.

I will and bequeath unto my daughter Martha Titus, my negro girl named Nanney. I will that the first girl that Nanney hath after the date of these presents, shall be my daughter Hannah Seaman's, and she shall have it when it is fit to wean. And when my daughter dyeth then Nanney shall be given to my grand-daughter Elizabeth Titus.

I will unto my son-in-law Jeremiah Scott my negro womann called Hanney that he hath in his possession until his youngest children come of age, and then she or value of her shall be divided equally amongst her four daughters or the survivor of them.

I will and bequeath unto my daughter Sarah Barnes my negro girl named Pegg.

I will and bequeath unto my daughter Elizabeth Doughty, my best bed and furniture.

I will and bequeath unto my daughter Mary Scott's four daughters or the survivor of them, my next choice of my beds and furniture.

I will and bequeath unto my three daughters, namely, Martha Titus, Sarah Barnes, and Hannah Seaman, my other three beds and the remainder of my furniture belonging to them to be equally divided among them.

I will that my funeral charges and proving my will and taking out letters of Administration, shall be paid out of my money, and my stock of cattle and sheep to be divided as follows; viz. to be divided in five equal parts, and my daughter Elizabeth Doughty to have one fifth part, and my daughter Sarah Barnes to have one fifth part, and my daughter Hannah Seaman to have one fifth part, and the four daughters of my deceased daughter Mary Scott to have one fifth part to be equally divided between them or the survivor of them.²

I do now hereby revoke, disallow, and dis-annull all former Wills and Testaments by me either by word or writing by me before this time made, ratifying, allowing and confirming this and no others to be my last Will and Testament.

Lastly, I do hereby appoint, constitute and ordain my trustworthy friend, Capt. John Treadwell, and my three sons, John Jackson, James Jackson and Samuel Jackson, to be my true and lawful Executors of this my last Will and Testament.

In witness whereof I have set my hand and fixed my seal, this day and year first above written. August 26th, 1724."

/s/ John Jackson, L. S.

Transcribed from: History of the Jackson Family of Hempstead, Long Island, NY, by Oscar Burton Robbins, privately published by Oscar Burton Robbins of Loveland, Colorado, 1951, pages 6 - 9.
¹ This question mark is in the transcription found in Robbins' book.  Apparently the original was difficult to read.
²The transcription appears to leave out the one-fifth for his daughter Martha Titus and this is assumed to be a transcription error.
Author Robbins states on pg 9: "He died in 1725, and his Will dated August 26th, 1724, was proved in the Surrogate's Office of the Province of New York, in Liber 10 of Wills, pages 107-116.

NOTE: The Long Island Genealogy site has an abbreviated version of this Will and also gives the following information: "the Will was dated August 26, 1724 and proved at Court of Common Pleas, Queens County, December 6, 1725. It was witnessed by Timothy Bayley, Daniel Jones and William Willis."

NOTE: While working with the book The Jones Family of Long Island, pg 65, I noticed that the author stated: "(Judge) DAVID Jones, son of Major Thomas Jones, had witnessed Col. John Jackson's will along with David's stepfather, Major Timothy BAGLEY." It appears the witnesses' names attributed by the Long Island Genealogy site were mis-read.

Fundraiser
Help fund new features!