Scott DNA Family in Georgia, Maryland, and North Carolina

Article Covers
Surnames
Scott
Places
Delaware, United States
Georgia, United States
Maryland, United States
North Carolina, United States

Contents

FamilyTreeDNA Scott Project

The Scott Project has identified an I2b Family 1 that includes the following, all with 36/37 or 37/37 Y-DNA matches
Kit No -- Name
19416 -- Nathaniel (1761-1846), Nathaniel, Nathaniel
155913 - William Hazelton Scott, b. 1805, Delaware, d. 1884, MO
164125 - James Scott b. ca. 1770, d. 1832, Screven Co., GA
167561 - Britton Scott c. 1794 - 1881 Emanuel County, GA
222325 - (unknown)

Haplogroup I2b1

Haplogroup I2b1 is a Subclade [subgroup] of Haplogroup I2 and (my reading) probably represents a viking origin.


Nathaniel Scott

DNA for a descendant of Nathaniel Scott matches the DNA of Britton Scott on 37/37 alleles, matches the DNA of William H. Scott on 36/37 alleles, and matches the DNA of James Scott on 36/37 alleles.

Nathaniel Scott is a known ancestor, b. 1786 in Montgomery County, North Carolina, thus of the same generation as the William Scott presumed to be a cousin of William Hazelton Scott. He could be either the same generation or one generation removed from James Scott and Britton Scott.

According to family accounts, Nathaniel Scott's family had it's origins in Queen Anne's County, Maryland, and his wife's father (Nathaniel Cheairs) and grandfather (also Nathaniel Cheairs) are known to have come from Queen Anne's County, Maryland.

The actual parentage of Nathaniel Scott the known ancestor is unclear. A Nathaniel Scott of Anson County has been considered but cannot presently be linked to Nathaniel Scott the known ancestor. Nathaniel Scott of Anson County could be a grandfather Nathaniel Scott the known ancestor, although more research needs to be done.

Nathaniel Scott of Anson County, North Carolina

Although Nathaniel Scott of Anson County does not appear to be the father of Nathaniel Scott the known ancestor, he could the grandfather. He remains of interest as well because of his connection (as a brother?) to a William Scott, who moved to Georgia. Nathaniel and William as given names also run through several generations of Scott families in Queen Anne's County, Maryland.

One note of interest: among his neighbors in North Carolina was a Mr. Thomas. Thomas is a common name, but it is also the surname of Mary Cheairs Scott's grandmother, from Queen Anne's County.


William Hazelton Scott

DNA for William Hazelton Scott was submitted by a great-great-grandson, and matches the DNA of James Scott on 36/37 alleles. It also matches the DNA of Britton Scott and Nathaniel Scott on 36/37 alleles.

William Hazelton Scott was b. about 1805, presumably in New Castle County, Delaware. He is thus potentially a generation younger than James Scott and (possibly) Britton Scott.

Most family stories say that William Hazelton Scott is the son of William Scott who was a Captain in the War of 1812, associated with the milling business in some way, and the son of a Thomas Scott who married a "Lady" Covington. These stories, and some variations, are preserved in family correspondence among the grandchildlren of William H. Scott. At least one early variant of the family story names Thomas Scott as William Hazelton Scott's father. Census records suggest that William Hazelton Scott's father was born in Maryland.

Correspondence among William Hazelton Scott's grandchildren also presents strong evidence for a relationship with another William Scott, one who, according to the 1850 Census, was born in Georgia. Based on information currently available, he is tentatively accepted as the father of William Hazelton Scott, although further research is needed to support that identification.

Of interest is that both the families of William Hazelton Scott and William Scott seem to/may have had a penchant for using old family surnames as middle names for their children. Surnames so used include:

Extreme Speculation, Questions & Random items of potential interest

Jane Seawell Cheairs, dau of Wharton Cheairs of Spring Hill, Maury County, Tennessee, b. 1882. Could it be that the Sewell name comes from a Cheairs connection? (see Nathaniel Scott)

Use of Thomas as a second name for children of William Hazelton Scott has always been assumed to refer to the supposed ancestor Thomas Scott. Is it possible, instead, that Thomas was considered a family name (which would account for it being used presumably three times)?

James Scott

DNA for James Scott matches the DNA of William Hazelton Scott and Nathaniel Scott on 36/37 alleles. It also matches the DNA of Britton Scott on 35/37 alleles.

James Scott was b. about 1770 and is probably a generation older than William Hazelton Scott and Britton Scott, and may be the same or one generation older than Nathaniel Scott.

At least two other Scott families in Screven County, Georgia appear to be related to James Scott, in some way, and are persons of interest: John Scott, and William Scott.

Also noted is that James Scott named two of his sons Drury and Dennis, both names also appearing as Revolutionary soldiers in North Carolina. The Dennis Scott who served in the war, however, is not a direct ancestor of James Scott, nor is the Drury Scott who appeared in the 1790 Census for Anson County, North Carolina. A potential connection to Anson County remains, however, with the possibility that the William Scott who abandoned land there is the same William Scott who was later granted land in Burke County, Georgia.

Britton Scott

Britton Scott is the First Generation for the DNA sample submitted by his [great-great-grandson?]. Britton Scott's DNA is an exact match on 37/37 alleles for Nathaniel Scott, matches the DNA of William Hazelton Scott on 36/37 alleles, and that of James Scott on 35/37 alleles.

Britton Scott was b. about 1799, Georgia, and could be the same generation or one generation removed from Nathaniel Scott, William Hazelton Scott, and William Scott. He is likely one generation younger than James Scott.

Speculation

Given the demonstrated connections, both through DNA and through (admittedly somewhat tenuous) documentary sources, between Georgia, Maryland, and North Carolina, it is possible that a common ancestor may be found in Queen Anne's County, Maryland. Of particular interest, at the moment, is another Nathaniel Scott, who is possibly the right age to be the father of Nathaniel Scott of Anson County, North Carolina, and who had sons named Nathaniel and William.

Fundraiser
Help fund new features!