Place:Tintagel, Cornwall, England

Watchers
NameTintagel
TypeVillage, Civil parish
Coordinates50.667°N 4.75°W
Located inCornwall, England
See alsoLesnewth Hundred, Cornwall, Englandhundred in which it was located
Camelford Rural, Cornwall, Englandrural district of which it was a part 1894-1974
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the following text is based on an article in Wikipedia

Tintagel or Trevena ( meaning village on a mountain) is a civil parish and village situated on the Atlantic coast of Cornwall, England. The population of the parish is 1,820 people, and the area of the parish is 4,281 acres (17.32 km).

The village and nearby Tintagel Castle are associated with the legends surrounding King Arthur and the knights of the Round Table. The village has, in recent times, become attractive to day-trippers, and tourists from many parts of the world, and is one of the most-visited places in Britain.

Tintagel was part of the Camelford Rural District from 1894 until 1974.

Tintagel, Trevena and Bossiney

The modern-day village of Tintagel was always known as Trevena (Cornish: Tre war Venydh) until the Post Office started using 'Tintagel' as the name in the mid 19th century (until then Tintagel had been restricted to the name of the headland and of the parish).

In Norman times a small castle was established at Bossiney, probably before the Domesday Survey of 1086; Bossiney and Trevena were established as a borough in 1253 by Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall. The borough of Bossiney was given the right to send two MPs to Parliament circa 1552 and continued to do so until 1832 when its status as a borough was abolished.

Treknow is the largest of the other settlements in the parish, which include Trethevy, Trebarwith, Tregatta, Trenale and Trewarmett.

Research Tips

One of the many maps available on A Vision of Britain through Time is one from the Ordnance Survey Series of 1900 illustrating the parish boundaries of Cornwall at the turn of the 20th century. This map blows up to show all the parishes and many of the small villages and hamlets.

The following websites have pages in WeRelate's Repository Section. Some provide free online databases.

  • GENUKI makes a great many suggestions as to other websites with worthwhile information about Cornwall as well as providing 19th century descriptions of each of the ecclesiastical parishes.
  • FamilySearch Wiki provides a similar information service to GENUKI which may be more up-to-date.
  • A Vision of Britain through Time has organization charts of the hierarchies of parishes within hundreds, registration districts and rural and urban districts of the 20th century plus excerpts from a gazetteer of circa 1870 outlining individual towns and parishes and reviews of population through the time period 1800-1960.
This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Tintagel. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.



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