Place:Randolph, Indiana, United States

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Randolph County is a county located in the U.S. state of Indiana. As of 2010, the population was 26,171. The county seat is Winchester.

Contents

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

The Indiana General Assembly authorized the formation of Randolph County from Wayne County in January 1818 to take effect in August 1818. The county was almost certainly named for Randolph County, North Carolina, where the area's first settlers came from. That county was named for Peyton Randolph, the first President of the Continental Congress under the Articles of Confederation.

Between 1820 and 1824, the county's territory extended to the Michigan boundary; consequently, the plat for the town of Fort Wayne (now a city) is recorded in Randolph County's Recorder's Office. Randolph County's population grew rapidly in the early years of the nineteenth century. It was also known as a progressive community. As a home to a large number of members of the Society of Friends (Quakers), education and abolitionism became important movements. The county was home to three famous settlements of free African-Americans. The most famous, the Greenville Settlement, in Greensfork Township, was the site of Union Literary Institute, one of the first racially-integrated schools in the United States.

Randolph County has been a Republican-stronghold since the 1850s. As such, the county produced two Governors, one Congressman, one U. S. Senator, three Indiana Secretaries of State, and one State Superintendent of Public Instruction between 1858 and 1931. The county's population growth slowed after 1880.

Randolph County answered the problem of rural decline in the early twentieth century by embracing much of the "Country Life Movement." The major act was the movement to consolidate the county's rural schools. This was done under the leadership of Lee L. Driver, a county native who became the nation's leading expert on rural school consolidation. Randolph County became the exemplar of the movement and was the subject of many publications and visits from officials from as far away as Canada and China.

In recent years, residents in Winchester, Union City, and Farmland have sought to revitalize the county through a renewed focus on historic preservation, tourism, and the arts.

Timeline

Date Event Source
1818 County formed Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1819 Marriage records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1819 Probate records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1820 First census Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
1820 Land records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1840 No significant boundary changes after this year Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
1882 Birth records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources

Population History

source: Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
Census Year Population
1820 1,808
1830 3,912
1840 10,684
1850 14,725
1860 18,997
1870 22,862
1880 26,435
1890 28,085
1900 28,653
1910 29,013
1920 26,484
1930 24,859
1940 26,766
1950 27,141
1960 28,434
1970 28,915
1980 29,997
1990 27,148

Research Tips

External links

www.rootsweb.com/~inrandol/


This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Randolph County, Indiana. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.