Place:Macon, Alabama, United States

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Macon County is a county in the U.S. state of Alabama. Its name is in honor of Nathaniel Macon, a member of the United States Senate from North Carolina. Developed for cotton plantation agriculture in the nineteenth century, it is one of the counties in Alabama within the Black Belt of the South.

As of the 2010 census, the population was 21,452. Its county seat is Tuskegee. Mostly rural and with high rates of poverty, the county has a majority African American population, descendants of slaves who worked on the plantations before the American Civil War. In the 2004 U.S. Presidential Election, Macon had the third-highest number of voters in the state for the Democratic Senator John Kerry. It was the setting of the 1974 movie, Macon County Line.

Tuskegee, Alabama is the county seat of Macon County and home to the Macon County Courthouse

Contents

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

For thousands of years, this area was inhabited by varying cultures of indigenous peoples. The historic tribes encountered by European explorers were the Creek people, descendants of the Mississippian culture.

Macon County was established by European Americans on December 18, 1832, from land ceded by the Creek, following the US Congress' passage of the Indian Removal Act of 1830. The Creek were removed to Indian Territory west of the Mississippi River. The new settlers brought slaves with them from eastern areas of the South, or purchased them in slave markets, such as at New Orleans. They developed the county for large cotton plantations.

In the first half of the twentieth century, thousands of blacks migrated out of the county to industrial cities in the North and Midwest for job opportunities, and lives away from legal segregation. Those who remained have struggled in the mostly rural county.

Before 1983, Macon County, Alabama, was primarily known as the home of historic Tuskegee Institute, now Tuskegee University, and its famous founder and first president, Dr. Booker T. Washington. The quiet hamlet began to awaken in 1983 when parimutuel gambling came to Macon County in the form of VictoryLand greyhound racing.

Timeline

Date Event Source
1832 County formed Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1834 Marriage records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1834 Probate records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1837 Land records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1840 First census Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
1870 No significant boundary changes after this year Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
1928 Birth records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources

Population History

source: Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
Census Year Population
1840 11,247
1850 26,898
1860 26,802
1870 17,727
1880 17,371
1890 18,439
1900 23,126
1910 26,049
1920 23,561
1930 27,103
1940 27,654
1950 30,561
1960 26,717
1970 24,841
1980 26,829
1990 24,928

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