Place:Knox, Tennessee, United States

Watchers
Contained Places
Cemetery
Calvary Catholic Cemetery
First Presbyterian Church Cemetery
Knoxville National Cemetery
Mount Olive Cemetery
New Gray Cemetery
Woodlawn Cemetery
Census-designated place
Mascot
Inhabited place
Aldenwood Park
Amber Meadows
Antioch
Arminda
Arrowhead
Asbury
Ashley Oaks
Audubon Hills
Ball Camp
Bayless
Beech Grove
Beechwood
Bell Bridge
Bell Campground
Belle-Aire
Belmont West
Berkshire Wood
Beverly Acres
Beverly
Blue Grass
Blueberry Hills
Bonny Kate
Boxwood Hills
Boyd
Brentwood
Broad Acres
Brookfield Acres
Buffat Heights
Burchfield Heights
Byrd Chapel
Camelot
Canby Hills
Carpenter Addition
Carter
Caswell
Cedar Bluff
Cedar Crest North
Cedar Flats
Cedar Springs
Cedarchase
Cherokee Ridge
Cherrybrook
Chilhowee Hills
Clear Springs
Concord
Concords Woods
Copper Ridge
Corinth
Corryton
Coster Yards
Countryside
Crenshaw
Crestwood Hills
Crossfield
Dante
Deep Creek
Dry Gap
Eastwood
Echo Valley
Edington
Fair Oaks
Farmington
Farragut
Farrington
Fieldview
Forks of the River
Fountaincrest
Fox Den
Fox Fire
Franklin Hill
Freeway
Galewood
Gapcreek
Garland
Glen Arden
Glenwood
Golden Meadows
Grandview
Graveston
Green Valley
Greenway
Greenwood Forest
Greenwood Heights
Gulf Park
Gulfwood
Hallbrook
Halls Crossroads
Happy Acres
Harbison Crossroads
Heather Heights
Heiskell
Hendron
Hickory Hills
Hickory Woods
Hidden Hills
Hidden Valley
High Bluff
Highland Park
Highland View
Highpoint
Holiday Hills
Homestead
House Mountain
Hunting Hills West
Huntingdon Place
Idlewood Acres
John Sevier
Johnson Road
Karns
Kensington
Kimberlin Heights
King Arthur Court
Kings Valley
Kingsgate
Kingsley Station
Kingston Hills
Kingston Woods
Kinkaid
Knoxville ( 1785 - )
Lakemoor Hills
Lakewood
Landmark
Lazy Acres
Lovell Heights
Lovell
Lyonton
Maloneyville
Mapleview
Marbledale
Mayo
McMillan
Middlebrook Acres
Midway
Mill Run
Millertown
Mockingbird Hill
Montvue
Moshina Heights
Mount Olive
Mule Hollow
Murphy Hills
Mynatt
Neubert Springs
Neubert
New Hopewell
Northbrook
Northhampton Acres
Northshore Woods
Oak Grove Heights
Oak Grove
Oxmore Hills
Pedigo
Peters Mill
Pine Springs
Pleasant Hills
Plum Creek
Powell Heights
Powell
Preston
Ramsey
Rennbore
Ridgeview Heights
Ritta
Riverbend
Riverdale
Robinson Crossroads
Rothwood
Sentertown
Seven Islands
Sevenoaks
Sevier Home
Shadow Wood
Shady Grove
Shipetown
Shooks
Skaggston
Solway
Southbrook
Spanish Trails
Spring Place
Station West
Still Brook
Stock Creek
Stonebrook
Stony Point
Suburban Hills
Sumter Hills
Sunrise
Sweet Briar
Tan Rara Oesta
Tekoa
Temple Acres
Third Creek
Thorn Grove
Thornton
Three Points
Timberlake
Topside
Trails End
Trails West
Treeville
Trentville
Twin Springs
Twinville
Valley Grove
Washington Heights
Welwyn
West Emory
West Haven
Westavia Woods
Westborough
Westlyn
Westminister Ridge
Wexford Downs
Whispering Hills
Whites Village
Windsor Park
Wood Creek West
Woodchase
Wooddale
Woodfield Park
Woodland Acres
Woodland Trace
Wyricktown
Zacharytown
Unknown
Fountain
West Knoxville
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Knox County is a county in the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of the 2010 census, the population was 432,226, making it the third most populous county in Tennessee. Its county seat and largest city is Knoxville. The county is at the geographical center of the Great Valley of East Tennessee. Near the heart of the county is the origin of the Tennessee River at the union of the Holston and French Broad rivers.

The county is included in the Knoxville Metropolitan Area.

Contents

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Knox County was created on June 11, 1792, by Governor William Blount from parts of Greene and Hawkins counties, one of the few counties created when the state was still known as the Southwest Territory.[1] It is one of nine United States counties named for American Revolutionary War general and first United States Secretary of War Henry Knox. Parts of Knox County later became Blount (1795), Anderson (1801), Roane (1801), and Union (1850) counties.

In 1783, an expedition into the Upper Tennessee Valley led by James White and Francis Alexander Ramsey explored what is now Knox County. White moved to what is now the Riverdale community in the eastern part of the county in 1785, and the following year constructed a fort a few miles to the west that would evolve into the city of Knoxville. Blount chose the fort as the capital of the Southwest Territory in 1790, and gave the new town the name "Knoxville" after his superior, Henry Knox.

Blount began construction of his house, Blount Mansion, in the early 1790s. The house still stands in downtown Knoxville. The Alexander McMillan House, built in the mid-1780s by Alexander McMillan (1749–1837), still stands in eastern Knox County. The Alexander Bishop House, built by Stockley Donelson in 1793, and a log house built in the same year by Nicholas Gibbs, both still stand in the northern part of the county. Campbell's Station, a fort and stagecoach stop located in what is now Farragut, was built by Captain David Campbell (1753–1832) in 1787. John Sevier established a plantation, known as Marble Springs, in the southern part of the county in the 1790s.

The Civil War

Knox County's strategic location along important railroad lines made it an area coveted by both Union and Confederate forces throughout the Civil War. Since the mountainous terrain of East Tennessee was mostly unsuitable for plantation crops such as cotton, slavery was not as prevalent as it was in Middle and West Tennessee - an 1860 census of Knox County showed a population of 20,020 white citizens and just 2,370 enslaved African Americans. The lack of slavery combined with the vestiges of a once strong abolitionist movement in the region were two of the reasons that Knox County, along with much of East Tennessee, contained a great deal of pro-Union sentiment. In February 1861, 89% of Knox Countians voted for the pro-Union ballot in a statewide referendum on secession. On June 8, 1861, the county voted against Tennessee's Ordinance of Secession by a margin of 3,108 to 1,226.

Prior to secession, Unionists from Knox County collaborated with other East Tennessee Unionists in an attempt to secede from Tennessee itself and remain part of the Union. O.P. Temple, a Knoxville lawyer, was named to a 3-man commission to appear before the General Assembly in Nashville and request East Tennessee and pro-Union Middle Tennessee counties be allowed to secede from the state. The attempt failed. Knox County joined the Confederacy along with the rest of Tennessee after the second referendum for secession passed in 1861.

Knox County remained under Confederate control until September 3, 1863, when General Ambrose Burnside and the Union army marched into Knoxville unopposed. Union Colonel William Harris, son of New York Senator Ira Harris, wrote his father:[2]


With the success of Burnside's troops in the Knoxville Campaign, and especially during the decisive Battle of Fort Sanders, Knox County remained under Union control for the duration of the Civil War.

Tennessee marble

In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Knox County played an important role in the quarrying and finishing of Tennessee marble, a type of limestone used in monument construction across the United States and Canada. Eleven quarries were operating in Knox County in 1882, and within ten years that number had doubled. Notable quarries in Knox included the Bond Quarry in Concord, an Evans Company quarry near Forks-of-the-River, and the Ross-Republic quarries near Island Home Park in South Knoxville. Finishing centers were located in Lonsdale and at the Candoro Marble Works in South Knoxville.

Timeline

Date Event Source
1791 Land records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1792 County formed Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1792 Court records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1792 Marriage records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1792 Probate records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1800 First census Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
1860 No significant boundary changes after this year Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
1881 Birth records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources

Population History

source: Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
Census Year Population
1800 12,446
1810 10,171
1820 13,034
1830 14,498
1840 15,485
1850 18,807
1860 22,813
1870 28,990
1880 39,124
1890 59,557
1900 74,302
1910 94,187
1920 112,926
1930 155,902
1940 178,468
1950 223,007
1960 250,523
1970 276,293
1980 319,694
1990 335,749

Research Tips

External Links

  • Outstanding guide to Knox County family history and genealogy resources (FamilySearch Research Wiki). Birth, marriage, and death records, censuses, wills, deeds, county histories, cemeteries, churches, naturalizations, newspapers, libraries, and genealogical societies.


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