Place:Covington, St. Tammany, Louisiana, United States

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NameCovington
Alt namesWhartonsource: USGS, GNIS Digital Gazetteer (1994) GNIS22004632
TypeCity
Coordinates30.479°N 90.104°W
Located inSt. Tammany, Louisiana, United States
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Covington is a city in and the parish seat of St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana, United States. The population was 8,765 at the 2010 census. It is located at a fork of the Bogue Falaya and the Tchefuncte River.

Covington is part of the New OrleansMetairieKenner Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

The earliest known settlement by Europeans in the area was in 1800 by Jacques Dreux. In 1813, John Wharton Collins established a town there with the name of Wharton. He is buried on the corner of the city cemetery directly across from the Covington Police Department. There are conflicting stories about how the city came to be named Covington. Many historians believe the city was renamed after General Leonard Covington, a hero of the War of 1812. However, local historian Judge Steve Ellis floats another theory centered around the suggestion by Jesse Jones, a local attorney, that the city be named in honor of the Blue Grass whiskey---made in Covington, Kentucky---enjoyed by town officials. In any case, Leonard Covington is the namesake of both towns.[1] Initially, commerce was brought to Covington via boat up the Bogue Falaya River, which uses the Tchefuncte River as means of passage to and from Lake Pontchartrain. Then, in 1888, the railroad came to town. Much of those rails are now occupied by the Tammany Trace, a thirty-one mile bike trail running through multiple cities north of Lake Pontchartrain.

In the late 20th century, with the expansion of Louisiana's road system, many people who worked in New Orleans started living in Covington, commuting to work via the Lake Pontchartrain Causeway. This is considered to be associated with white flight out of New Orleans, though the Jefferson Parish area saw the most expansion during this time.

Hurricane Katrina

Though Hurricane Katrina made landfall near Slidell, Covington was sufficiently elevated to escape the massive storm surge; however, the city suffered devastating wind damage. Following the storm, Covington, along with the rest of the North Shore of Lake Pontchartrain, experienced a population boom as a result of many former inhabitants of the New Orleans area being forced to move out of their storm-ravaged homes. The town's population continues to grow.

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