Place:Clifford, West Riding of Yorkshire, England

Watchers
NameClifford
Alt namesClifordsource: Domesday Book (1985) p 315
TypeVillage, Civil parish
Coordinates53.885°N 1.355°W
Located inWest Riding of Yorkshire, England     ( - 1974)
Also located inWest Yorkshire, England     (1974 - )
Yorkshire, England    
See alsoWetherby Rural, West Riding of Yorkshire, Englandrural district of which it was a part 1894-1974
Leeds (metropolitan borough), West Yorkshire, Englandmetropolitan borough of which it has been a part since 1974
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Clifford is a small village in the City of Leeds, West Yorkshire, England. The village is 3 miles (5 km) south of Wetherby. Many of the older buildings are built of magnesian limestone.


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Clifford was a township in the old parish of Bramham, in the upper division of the wapentake of Barkston Ash, in the West Riding of Yorkshire. It became a separate civil parish in 1866 as Clifton with Boston, which was split into the civil parishes of Clifford and Boston Spa in 1896.

Between 1894 and 1974, Ledston was located in Wetherby Rural District. Ecclesiastically, Clifford was in the ecclesiastical parish of Bramham in Barkston Ash Wapentake.

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

The village of Clifford takes its name from Clyf' and ford Old English for ford at the bank or cliff, referring to the crossing of the River Wharfe at Boston Spa which was then within the manor. Clifford is mentioned in the Domesday Book, when Ligulf held the manor of six carucates with four ploughs.

Clifford was originally a farming community, but in the 1831, the corn mills, powered by the Bramham Beck, on Old Mill Lane were transformed into flax mills, making patent yarn and shoe thread. The mills were owned by the Grimston Brothers. At its height the business employed about 300 workers, some of them Irish immigrants, and many of whom lived in the stone terraced cottages in the village.[1]

Research Tips

  • GENUKI on Asselby. The GENUKI page gives numerous references to local bodies providing genealogical assistance.
  • The FamilySearch wiki on the ecclesiastical parish of Bramham provides a list of useful resources for the local area.
  • A Vision of Britain through Time on Asselby.
  • A Vision of Britain through Time also provides links to maps of the West Riding, produced by the United Kingdom Ordnance Survey, illustrating the boundaries between the civil parishes and the rural districts at various dates. Those listed here provide data for the part of the West Riding that transferred to North Yorkshire in 1974 plus the northern parts of Leeds and Bradford. These maps all blow up to a scale that will illustrate small villages and large farms or estates.
  • Ordnance Survey West Riding 1888. The "Sanitary Districts (which preceded the rural districts) for the whole of the West Riding.
  • Ordnance Survey Northern part of the West Riding 1900 The rural and urban districts, not long after their introduction. (rural districts of Sedbergh, Settle, Skipton, Pateley Bridge, Ripon, Knaresborough, Great Ouseburn, Clitheroe, Wharfedale, Wetherby, York, Bishopthorpe, Keighley, the northern part of Bradford, the northern part of Leeds, the northern part of Hunslet Urban District, the northern part of Tadcaster Rural District, the northern part of Selby Rural District)
  • Ordnance Survey Northern part of the West Riding 1944. The urban and rural districts of the northern part of the West Riding (mostly Settle, Skipton, Ripon and Pateley Bridge, and Nidderdale, with sections of Wharfedale and Wetherby) after the revisions of 1935.
  • Ordnance Survey Southern part of the West Riding 1944 shows the southern part of the West Riding (including the southern part of Wetherby Rural District).
This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Clifford, West Yorkshire. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.