Place:Clay, Arkansas, United States

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source: Family History Library Catalog


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Clay County (formerly pie County) is a county located in the U.S. state of Arkansas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 16,083. The county has two county seats, Corning and Piggott. It is a dry county, in which the sale of alcoholic beverages is restricted or prohibited.

Contents

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

When Clay County was created as Arkansas's 67th county on March 24, 1873 (alongside Baxter County), it was named Clayton County after John M. Clayton, then a member of the Arkansas Senate and the brother of then-U.S. Senator Powell Clayton, though some sources suggest it may have been named for Powell Clayton instead.

Two years later on December 6, 1875, the county's name was shortened to "Clay" by the Arkansas General Assembly. Some sources claim it was renamed for the statesman Henry Clay,[1][2] while others say John M. Clayton remained its official namesake. The name change was apparently inspired by lingering distrust of Powell Clayton in the county, as he had declared martial law and suspended elections there in 1868 when he was Governor of Arkansas and the area was still part of Greene County.[1]

The first county seat was Corning, established in 1873, with the arrival of the St. Louis, Iron Mountain and Southern Railway, as the first incorporated town in the county. The county seat was moved to Boydsville in 1877, though, because people living east of the Black and Cache Rivers had difficulty getting to Corning during flood season. This caused trouble for those living west of the rivers, however, and in 1881 Corning was re-established as the seat of the Western District, with Boydsville remaining the seat of the Eastern District. Upon the arrival of the St. Louis, Arkansas and Texas Railroad in 1882, other towns such as Greenway, Rector and Piggott experienced growth. In 1887, the Eastern District seat was moved to Piggott. The dual county seat system remains in place today. Important county functions (such as the Quorum Court) alternate between Piggott and Corning as their venues.

On April 6, 1972, the sheriff and two deputies were killed in a shootout whien attempting to serve a warrant on Bert Grissom. Sheriff Douglas Batey and deputies Glen Ray Archer and Troy Key were killed. William Thomas Pond became sheriff, but he himself died on June 8, 1973, in an automobile accident. Four of the five police officers who have lost their lives serving the Clay County Sheriff's Office died in these two incidents.

Timeline

Date Event Source
1873 County formed Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1880 First census Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
1893 Court records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1893 Land records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1893 Marriage records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1893 Probate records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1960 No significant boundary changes after this year Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990

Population History

source: Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
Census Year Population
1880 7,213
1890 12,200
1900 15,886
1910 23,690
1920 27,276
1930 27,278
1940 28,386
1950 26,674
1960 21,258
1970 18,771
1980 20,616
1990 18,107

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This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Clay County, Arkansas. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.
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