Place:Buncombe, North Carolina, United States

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source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


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Buncombe County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. It is part of the Metropolitan Statistical Area of Asheville, North Carolina. As of the 2010 census, the population was 238,318. Its county seat is Asheville.

Contents

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

The county was formed in 1791 from parts of Burke County and Rutherford County. It was named for Edward Buncombe, a colonel in the American Revolutionary War, who was captured at the Battle of Germantown. The large county originally extended to the Tennessee line. Many of the settlers were Baptists, and in 1807 the pastors of six churches including the revivalist Sion Blythe formed the French Broad Association of Baptist churches in the area.

In 1808 the western part of Buncombe County became Haywood County. In 1833 parts of Burke County and Buncombe County were combined to form Yancey County, and in 1838 the southern part of what was left of Buncombe County became Henderson County. In 1851 parts of Buncombe County and Yancey County were combined to form Madison County. Finally, in 1925 the Broad River township of McDowell County was transferred to Buncombe County.

In 1820, a U.S. Congressman, whose district included Buncombe County, unintentionally contributed a word to the English language. In the Sixteenth Congress, after lengthy debate on the Missouri Compromise, members of the House called for an immediate vote on that important question. Instead, Felix Walker rose to address his colleagues, insisting that his constituents expected him to make a speech "for Buncombe." It was later remarked that Walker's untimely and irrelevant oration was not just for Buncombe—it "was Buncombe." Thus, buncombe, afterwards spelled and then shortened to bunk, became a term for empty, nonsensical talk. This, in turn, is the etymology of the verb .

Timeline

Date Event Source
1790 Court records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1791 County formed Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1791 Land records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1800 First census Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
1815 Probate records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1842 Marriage records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1887 Birth records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1930 No significant boundary changes after this year Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990

Population History

source: Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
Census Year Population
1800 5,812
1810 9,277
1820 10,542
1830 16,281
1840 10,084
1850 13,425
1860 12,654
1870 15,412
1880 21,909
1890 35,266
1900 44,288
1910 49,798
1920 64,148
1930 97,937
1940 108,755
1950 124,403
1960 130,074
1970 145,056
1980 160,934
1990 174,821

Note: Created in 1803 as a Georgia county and reported in 1810 as part of Georgia; abolished after a review of the State boundary determined that its area was located in North Carolina. By 1820 it was part of Buncombe County.

Research Tips

External links

www.buncombecounty.org


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