Person:Uhtred of Galloway (1)

Uhtred of Galloway
b.abt 1120
d.22 Sep 1174
Facts and Events
Name Uhtred of Galloway
Alt Name Uchtred MAC FERGUSA, Lord of Galloway
Gender Male
Birth[1] abt 1120
Alt Birth? abt 1135
Death[1][2] 22 Sep 1174


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Uchtred mac Fergusa (c. 1120 – September 22, 1174) was Lord of Galloway from 1161 to 1174, ruling jointly with his half-brother Gille Brigte (Gilbert). They were sons of Fergus of Galloway; their mothers' names are unknown, but Uchtred may have been born to one of the many illegitimate daughters of Henry I of England.

As a boy he was sent as a hostage to the court of King Máel Coluim IV of Scotland. When his father, Prince Fergus, died in 1161, Uchtred was made co-ruler of Galloway along with Gilla Brigte. They participated in the disastrous invasion of Northumberland under William I of Scotland in 1174. King William was captured, and the Galwegians rebelled, taking the opportunity to slaughter the Norman and Saxon settlers in their land. During this time Uchtred was brutally mutilated, blinded, castrated, and killed by his brother Gille Brigte and Gille Brigte's son, Máel Coluim. Gille Brigte then seized control of Galloway entire.

Uchtred had married Gunhilda of Dunbar, and they were the parents of Lochlann and Eve of Galloway, wife of Walter de Berkeley.

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References
  1. 1.0 1.1 Uhtred of Galloway, in Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. (Online: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.).
  2. Uchtred, Lord of Galloway, in Lundy, Darryl. The Peerage: A genealogical survey of the peerage of Britain as well as the royal families of Europe.
  3.   UHTRED of Galloway (-1174)., in Cawley, Charles. Medieval Lands: A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families.