Person:James I of England (1)

Find records: birth marriage death
m. 29 Jul 1565
  1. James I , of England1566 - 1625
m. 23 NOV 1589
  1. Henry Frederick , Prince of Wales1594 - 1612
  2. Elisabeth of Bohemia1596 - 1661/2
  3. Margaret Stuart1598 - 1600
  4. Charles I , of England1600 - 1649
  5. Robert Stuart, Duke of Kintyre1601/02 - 1602
  6. Mary Stuart1605 - 1607
  7. Sophia Stuart1606 - 1606
Facts and Events
Name James I , of England
Alt Name James VI , of Scotland
Gender Male
Birth? 19 Jun 1566 City of Edinburgh, ScotlandEdinburgh Castle
Marriage 23 NOV 1589 Oslo, Norwayto Anne of Denmark
Death? 27 Mar 1625 Theobalds Park, Cheshunt, Hertfordshire Co., EnglandCause: kidney failure
Burial[2] 29 Mar 1625 Westminster Abbey, Westminster, Middlesex, England
Other? House of Stuart


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

James VI and I (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567 and King of England and Ireland as James I from the union of the Scottish and English crowns on 24 March 1603 until his death. The kingdoms of Scotland and England were individual sovereign states, with their own parliaments, judiciary, and laws, though both were ruled by James in personal union.

He succeeded to the Scottish throne at the age of thirteen months, after his mother Mary, Queen of Scots, was compelled to abdicate in his favour. Four different regents governed during his minority, which ended officially in 1578, though he did not gain full control of his government until 1583. In 1603, he succeeded the last Tudor monarch of England and Ireland, Elizabeth I, who died without issue. He continued to reign in all three kingdoms for 22 years, a period known as the Jacobean era after him, until his death in 1625 at the age of 58. After the Union of the Crowns, he based himself in England (the largest of the three realms) from 1603, only returning to Scotland once in 1617, and styled himself "King of Great Britain and Ireland". He was a major advocate of a single parliament for both England and Scotland. In his reign, the Plantation of Ulster and British colonisation of the Americas began.

At 57 years and 246 days, his reign in Scotland was longer than any of his predecessors. He achieved most of his aims in Scotland but faced great difficulties in England, including the Gunpowder Plot in 1605 and repeated conflicts with the English Parliament. Under James, the "Golden Age" of Elizabethan literature and drama continued, with writers such as William Shakespeare, John Donne, Ben Jonson, and Sir Francis Bacon contributing to a flourishing literary culture. James himself was a talented scholar, the author of works such as Daemonologie (1597), True Law of Free Monarchies (1598), and Basilikon Doron (1599). He sponsored the translation of the Bible that was named after him: the Authorised King James Version. Sir Anthony Weldon claimed that James had been termed "the wisest fool in Christendom", an epithet associated with his character ever since. Since the latter half of the twentieth century, however, historians have revised James's reputation and have treated him as a serious and thoughtful monarch.

This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at James I of England. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.
References
  1.   James I of England, in Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. (Online: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.).
  2. Charles James I, in Find A Grave.
  3.   James I Charles Stuart, King of Great Britain, in Lundy, Darryl. The Peerage: A genealogical survey of the peerage of Britain as well as the royal families of Europe.