Person:James Cowan (48)

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James Hervey Cowan
d.25 October 1871
m. 1795
  1. Jean Glascow Cowan1796 - 1816
  2. James Hervey Cowan1801 - 1871
m. 24 November 1830
  1. Perez Dickinson Cowan1843 - 1923
  2. James D. Cowan
Facts and Events
Name James Hervey Cowan
Gender Male
Birth[1] 23 December 1801 Knoxville, Knox, Tennessee, United States
Marriage 24 November 1830 Knoxville, Knox County, Tennesseeto Lucinda Dickinson
Death[1] 25 October 1871

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Smoky Mountain Cowan Tapestry
Cowan Tapestry
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The Tapestry
Families Old Chester Old Augusta Germanna
New River SWVP Cumberland Carolina Cradle
The Smokies

Related

Cowan's Cottage discusses a cottage on the estate of James Cowan, a "Mechant Prince" of Knoxville. The home is now on property owned by the University of TN.

References
  1. 1.0 1.1 Rothrock, Mary Utopia, and East Tennessee Historical Society. Knox County History Committee. The French Broad Holston country, a history of Knox County, Tennessee. (Knoxville, Tennessee: East Tennessee Historical Society, 1946, c1972), pg. 401-402.

    Cowan, James Hervey (Dec. 23, 1801-Oct. 25, 1871), merchant, was the son of James and Margaret (Russell) Cowan who married in Jefferson County, Tennessee, and removed to Knoxville in the early part of 1801. James Cowan's brothers, Nathaniel and Samuel Cowan, who conducted a store at Jonesboro were the first to establish a mercantile business in Knoxville. James, also opened a store but died in June of the same year.

    James Hervey married, November 26, 1830, Lucinda Dickinson who had come from Amherst, Massachusetts, to teach in the Knoxville Female Academy of which her brother-in-law, Joseph Estabrook, was president. She was born April 18, 1811 and died April 27, 1849. They had two sons and five daughters. One son, Perez Dickinson Cowan, became a Presbyterian minister; was pastor of the Presbyterian church at Rogersville a number of years; also a contributor of historical sketches for newspapers. The other son, James D. Cowan, was a merchant who lived in a spendid mansion on West Cumberland Avenue, which is now the property of the University of Tennessee. His grandson, the late James D. Cowan, was for many years a trustee at Lawson McGhee Library.