Person:Francis Hopkins (6)

Watchers
Francis Marion Hopkins
b.abt. 1780 Kentucky
m. abt 1778
  1. Henry Hopkins1779 - aft 1844
  2. Francis Marion Hopkinsabt 1780 - 1838
  3. William Hopkinsabt 1781 - 1856
  4. Mary Hopkinsbef 1784 -
  5. Abiah Hopkinsabt 1787 -
  6. Joslin Hopkins1795 - 1865
  7. Eldridge Hopkins1800 - 1831
m. 28 Feb 1800
  1. Capt. James Elliott Hopkins1805 - 1878
  2. Isabella Hadden Hopkins1805 - 1895
  3. Richard Mark Hopkins1809 - 1869
  4. William Henry Harrison Hopkinsabt 1817 - 1843
m. 1 Jan 1818
Facts and Events
Name[1][2] Francis Marion Hopkins
Alt Name[3] Frank Hopkins
Gender Male
Birth[2] abt. 1780 Kentucky
Marriage 28 Feb 1800 Montgomery County, Kentucky(his 1st wife; 6 children)
to Catherine Elliott
Military[4] 7 Nov 1811 Indiana
Marriage 1 Jan 1818 Gibson County, Indiana(his 2nd wife; no issue?)
to Sophia Gudgiel
Census[6] 1820 Gibson County, Indiana
Death? 1838? near mouth of Mill Creek, Red River County, Texas

Gibson County, Indiana, 1820 census:[6]

Hopkins, Francis (agriculture = 1)
Males
under 10 = 2
10-15 = 3
26-44 = 1
Females
10-15 = 1
16-25 = 1
26-44 = 1
References
  1. Clark, Pat B. The History of Clarksville and Old Red River County. (Dallas: Mathis, Van Nort & Co., 1937), p. 81.

    On 18 Oct 1830, he signed a petition to the county court of Miller County for a "passable road" from Davis's Landing to the courthouse at Jonesboro.

  2. 2.0 2.1 Handbook of Texas Online, "Hopkins, Francis M.".
  3. Clark, Pat B. The History of Clarksville and Old Red River County. (Dallas: Mathis, Van Nort & Co., 1937), p. 7.
  4. Clark, Pat B. The History of Clarksville and Old Red River County. (Dallas: Mathis, Van Nort & Co., 1937), p. 26.

    He reportedly fought at the Battle of Tippecanoe, accompanied by an Indian friend. The latter was wounded in the hand by a saber cut and was thereafter known as "Old Cuthand." (This story is completely unverified, however.) He traveled from Indiana to Texas c.1823 with his family, accompanied by "Old Cuthand." He intended to join Austin's colony but stopped at the Burkham Settlement to raise a crop of wheat and never left.

  5.   Texas. General Land Office. Abstracts of All Original Texas Land Titles Comprising Grants and Locations. (Austin, Texas: Texas General Land Office), Patent #884 (Abstract # 412).

    On 20 Mar 1849, he received 1st Class headright certificate #297 for 177 acres, which he located north of Avery. [Was it actually claimed by his heirs?]

  6. 6.0 6.1 Gibson, Indiana, United States. 1820 U.S. Census Population Schedule, p. 240.