Source:Colonial Collegians: Biographies of Those Who Attended American Colleges before the War for Independence

Source Colonial Collegians: Biographies of Those Who Attended American Colleges before the War for Independence
Coverage
Subject Biography
Publication information
Type Miscellaneous
Publisher Massachusetts Historical Society & New England Historic Genealogical Society
Date issued 2005
Place issued Boston, Mass.
Citation
Colonial Collegians: Biographies of Those Who Attended American Colleges before the War for Independence. (Boston, Mass.: Massachusetts Historical Society & New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2005).
Repositories
AmericanAncestors.orgPaid website

From the introduction to the CD-ROM:

“…The primary purpose of Colonial Collegians: Biographies of Those Who Attended American Colleges before the War for Independence is to provide basic facts—vital data as well as information about careers and accomplishments—on its subjects, the boys and men who attended school through the Class of 1774, the last to graduate before the start of the American Revolution. Historians have ordinarily recognized nine such institutions—the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University), the College of Philadelphia (now the University of Pennsylvania), the College of Rhode Island (now Brown University), the College of William and Mary, Dartmouth College, Harvard College, King’s College (now Columbia University), Queen’s College (now Rutgers University), and Yale College. Colonial Collegians includes entries on all the known graduates and non-graduates of these schools as well as on twenty men said to have attended William Tennent’s Log College, an academy for aspiring Presbyterian clergymen near Philadelphia, c. 1735-c. 1744; twenty-eight graduates of the medical school at the College of Philadelphia; and sixteen students, both graduates and non-graduates, of the medical school at King’s College. All told, there are entries for nearly six thousand individuals, some of whom have multiple listings because they attended more than one school. There are also a small number of sketches of men who received honorary degrees from Harvard College without actually matriculating.”