Place:Scranton, Lackawanna, Pennsylvania, United States

Watchers


NameScranton
Alt namesCapousesource: USGS, GNIS Digital Gazetteer (1994) GNIS42031892
Deep Hollowsource: USGS, GNIS Digital Gazetteer (1994) GNIS42031892
Harrisonsource: USGS, GNIS Digital Gazetteer (1994) GNIS42031892
Hyde Parksource: Family History Library Catalog
Scrantoniasource: Family History Library Catalog
Slocum Hollowsource: USGS, GNIS Digital Gazetteer (1994) GNIS42031892
Unionvillesource: Family History Library Catalog
TypeCity
Coordinates41.411°N 75.667°W
Located inLackawanna, Pennsylvania, United States     (1770 - )
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Scranton is the sixth-largest city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. It is the county seat and largest city of Lackawanna County in Northeastern Pennsylvania's Wyoming Valley and hosts a federal court building for the United States District Court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania. With a population of 77,291, it is the largest city in the Scranton–Wilkes-Barre–Hazleton, PA Metropolitan Statistical Area, which has a population of about 570,000. The city is conventionally divided into 7 districts: North Scranton, Southside, Westside, East Scranton (Hill Section), Central City, Minooka, and Green Ridge, though these areas do not have legal status.

Scranton is the geographic and cultural center of the Lackawanna River valley, and the largest of the former anthracite coal mining communities in a contiguous quilt-work that also includes Wilkes-Barre, Nanticoke, Pittston, and Carbondale. Scranton was incorporated on February 14, 1856, as a borough in Luzerne County and as a city on April 23, 1866. It became a major industrial city, a center of mining and railroads, and attracted thousands of new immigrants. It was the site of the Scranton General Strike in 1877.

People in northern Luzerne County sought a new county in 1839 but the Wilkes-Barre area resisted losing its assets. Lackawanna County did not gain independent status until 1878. Under legislation allowing the issue to be voted by residents of the proposed territory, voters favored the new county by a proportion of 6 to 1, with Scranton residents providing the major support. The city was designated as the county seat when Lackawanna County was established in 1878, and a judicial district was authorized in 1879.

The city "took its first step toward earning its reputation as the "Electric City" when electric lights were introduced in 1880 at Dickson Locomotive Works. Six years later, the nation's first streetcars powered exclusively by electricity began operating in the city. Rev. David Spencer, a local Baptist minister, later proclaimed Scranton as the "Electric City".

History

Research Tips


This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Scranton, Pennsylvania. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.