Place:Fife, Scotland

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NameFife
Alt namesFIFsource: Curious Fox: UK Counties and Shires [online] (2002). accessed 16 Dec 2002
Fifeshire
Fìobhsource: Wikipedia
Kingdom of Fife
TypeTraditional county
Coordinates56.25°N 3.033°W
Located inScotland     ( - 1975)
Contained Places
Burgh
Culross ( 1891 - 1975 )
Ferry Port on Craig ( - 1975 )
District
North-East Fife
Former village
Coalhill
Inhabited place
Dalgety Bay
Falkland
Ferry Port on Craig ( - 1975 )
Glenrothes ( 1900 - )
Inverkeithing (town) ( - 1975 )
Kelty ( - 1975 )
Kincardine on Forth ( 1891 - 1975 )
Methilhill
Newport-on-Tay ( - 1975 )
North Queensferry ( - 1975 )
Pitliver ( 1975 - )
Ramornie ( 1975 - )
Rosyth ( - 1975 )
Springfield
St. Andrews ( 1000 - 1975 )
Parish
Abbotshall ( - 1975 )
Abdie
Aberdour
Anstruther Easter
Anstruther Wester ( 1845 - 1975 )
Arngask ( - 1891 )
Auchterderran
Auchtermuchty
Auchtertool
Ballingry
Balmerino
Beath
Burntisland ( 1845 - 1975 )
Cameron
Carnbee
Carnock
Ceres
Collessie
Crail ( 1845 - 1975 )
Creich ( - 1975 )
Culross ( 1891 - 1975 )
Cults
Cupar ( - 1975 )
Dairsie ( 900 - )
Dalgety ( - 1975 )
Dunbog ( - 1975 )
Dunfermline ( - 1975 )
Dunino
Dysart ( - 1901 )
Elie
Ferry Port on Craig ( - 1975 )
Flisk ( - 1975 )
Forgan ( - 1975 )
Inverkeithing ( - 1975 )
Kemback
Kennoway ( - 1975 )
Kettle ( - 1975 )
Kilconquhar ( - 1975 )
Kilmany ( - 1975 )
Kilrenny ( - 1975 )
Kinghorn
Kinglassie ( - 1975 )
Kingsbarns ( - 1975 )
Kirkcaldy
Largo ( - 1975 )
Leslie ( - 1975 )
Leuchars ( - 1975 )
Logie ( - 1975 )
Markinch ( - 1975 )
Monimail ( - 1975 )
Moonzie ( - 1975 )
Newburgh ( - 1975 )
Newburn ( - 1975 )
Pittenweem ( - 1975 )
Saint Monance ( - 1975 )
Saline ( - 1975 )
Scoonie ( - 1975 )
St. Andrews and St. Leonards ( - 1975 )
Strathmiglo ( - 1975 )
Torryburn ( - 1975 )
Tulliallan ( 1891 - 1975 )
Wemyss


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Fife (; /fɐif/ in Scottish English;) is a council area and historic county of Scotland. It is situated between the Firth of Tay and the Firth of Forth, with inland boundaries to Perth and Kinross and Clackmannanshire. By custom it is widely held to have been one of the major Pictish kingdoms, known as Fib, and is still commonly known as the Kingdom of Fife within Scotland. Fife is one of the six local authorities part of the Edinburgh and South East Scotland city region.

It is a lieutenancy area, and was a county of Scotland until 1975. It was very occasionally known by the anglicisation Fifeshire in old documents and maps compiled by English cartographers and authors. A person from Fife is known as a Fifer.

Fife was a local government region divided into three districts: Dunfermline, Kirkcaldy and North-East Fife. Since 1996 the functions of the district councils have been exercised by the unitary Fife Council.

Fife is Scotland's third largest local authority area by population. It has a resident population of just under 367,000, over a third of whom live in the three principal towns of Dunfermline, Kirkcaldy and Glenrothes.

The historic town of St Andrews is located on the northeast coast of Fife. It is well known for the University of St Andrews, one of the most ancient universities in the world and is renowned as the home of golf.

Research Tips

  • official civil (from 1855) and parish registers (from when first produced) for births, marriages and deaths for all of Scotland
  • original census images for all years available (1841-1911).
  • collections of wills and testaments and
  • property tax listings
  • an extensive collection of local maps
  • kirk session records for individual parishes (added in 2021 and not yet complete).

This site is extremely easy to use. There are charges for parish register entries, collections of wills, and census listings (the 1881 census is free to view, also on Ancestry and FindMyPast). The charges are reasonable and payable by online transfer. Viewing the kirk session records is free, but a charge will be made for a copy.

  • The National Library of Scotland have an online map collection of historic and modern day maps which can zoom in on a specific farmhouse or street in a town. Their collection also includes London and some counties of southeast England.
  • Gazetteer for Scotland contains an article for each parish from the Ordnance Gazetteer of Scotland by F. H. Groome, (published 1882-4) and short details about each parish today including names of small settlements within a parish.
  • The FamilySearch Wiki explains a great many legal terms only found in Scotland and provides a gazetteer for genealogists for each parish across the county. It reviews the availablility of parish registers.
  • GENUKI Scotland which provides for each Scottish parish (indexed by county), amongst other data, complete quotations from A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (1851) by Samuel Lewis, John Bartholomew's A Gazetteer of the British Isles (1877), and possibly other gazetteers from individual counties and regions. It is worth reviewing one of its county pages to see what is available online or in print from local archive providers. Each county page has a "Where in ---shire is .... ? section--very helpful in pinpointing the small places below parish level.
  • A list of Burial Grounds in Scotland is now available on the website of the Scottish Association of Family History Societies.
  • The Statistical Accounts of Scotland Online provides access to digitised and fully searchable versions of both the Old Statistical Account (1791-99) and the New Statistical Account (1834-45). These uniquely rich and detailed parish reports, usually written by local Church of Scotland ministers, detail social conditions in Scotland and are an invaluable resource for anyone interested in Scottish history.
This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Fife. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.