Place:Farndon, Cheshire, England

Watchers
NameFarndon
Alt namesFerentonesource: Domesday Book (1985) p 52
TypeAncient parish, Civil parish
Coordinates53.1°N 2.883°W
Located inCheshire, England
See alsoBroxton Hundred, Cheshire, Englandhundred in which it was situated
Tarvin Rural, Cheshire, Englandrural district in which it was located 1894-1974
Chester City District, Cheshire, Englanddistrict municipality covering the area 1974-2009
Cheshire West and Chester District, Cheshire, Englandunitary authority in which it is located since 2009
the following text is based on an article in Wikipedia

Farndon has been since 2009 a village and civil parish in the unitary authority of Cheshire West and Chester and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. It is located on the eastern bank of the River Dee, south of Chester. It is bounded on the west by the principality of Wales. At the 2001 Census, the parish had a population of 1,517.

Farndon was an ancient parish and before 1858 included the townships of Barton, Churton by Farndon, Clutton and Crewe by Farndon. Kings Marsh or Kingsmarsh or King's Marsh was until 1858 an extraparochial area situated between Farndon and Barton. In 1858 it became a civil parish as did the townships listed above.

Image:Farndon 1900.png

A Vision of Britain through Time provides the following description of Farndon from John Marius Wilson's Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales of 1870-72:

"FARNDON, a village, a township, and a parish in Great Boughton [registration] district, Cheshire. The village stands on the river Dee, 4 miles ESE of Rossett [railway] station, and 7½ S of Chester; was known at Domesday as Forendon; is connected, by a ten-arched bridge, with Holt in Wales; and has a post office under Chester, and fairs on 4 April and 4 Oct. The township comprises 1,025 acres. Real property: £2,930. Population: 557. Houses: 102.
"The parish contains also the townships of Barton, Clutton, Crewe, and Churton-by-Farndon. Acres: 2,856. Real property: £6,378. Population: 992. Houses: 191. The living is a vicarage in the diocese of Chester. Value: £115. Patron, the Marquis of Westminster. The church was rebuilt on the site of one burnt in 1645; was repaired in 1869; and includes a chapel of the Barnston family, rebuilt in 1869. There are two Primitive Methodist chapels, an endowed school, a national school, a reading room , and charities £15. Major Barnston, who served in the Crimean war, is commemorated by an obelisk; and John Speed, the antiquary [and mapmaker], was a native."

Research Tips

Definitions

  • See the Wikipedia articles on parishes and civil parishes for descriptions of this lowest rung of local administration. The original parishes (known as ancient parishes) were ecclesiastical, under the jurisdiction of the local priest and his bishop. A parish covered a specific geographical area and was sometimes equivalent to that of a manor. Sometimes, in the case of very large rural parishes, there were chapelries where a "chapel of ease" allowed parishioners to worship closer to their homes. In the 19th century the term civil parish was adopted to define parishes with a secular form of local government. In WeRelate both civil and ecclesiastical parishes are included in the type of place called a "parish". Smaller places within parishes, such as chapelries and hamlets that never became independent civil parishes, have been redirected into the parish in which they are located. The names of these smaller places are italicized within the text.
  • Rural districts were groups of geographically close civil parishes in existence between 1894 and 1974. They were formed as a middle layer of administration between the county and the civil parish. Inspecting the archives of a rural district will not be of much help to the genealogist or family historian, unless there is need to study land records in depth.
  • Registration districts were responsible for civil registration or vital statistics and census records. The boundaries of these districts were revised from time to time depending on population density and local government organization. To ascertain the registration district to which a parish belonged in the timeframe in question, see Registration Districts in Cheshire, part of the UK_BMD website.

Helpful Sources

  • Cheshire Archives and Local Studies are the local keepers of historical material for the county.
  • FamilySearch Cheshire Research Wiki provides a good overview of the county and also articles on most of the individual parishes (very small or short-lived ones may have been missed).
  • The GENUKI pages on Cheshire and its parishes point to many other sources of information on places within the county. The many small parishes and townships that existed before 1866 are treated individually as well as the larger towns and conurbations. The GENUKI pages for individual parishes now include a map of the parish and its surrounding area.
  • A Vision of Britain through Time also has summaries and lists of statistics for each parish, but its organization is not for the beginning family historian in a hurry.
  • The pay websites Ancestry and FindMyPast have a number of county-wide collections of censuses, Church of England baptisms, marriages and burials (some from the 1500s), and some providing microfilm copies of the manuscript entries. An international subscription is necessary to access Ancestry's UK holdings.
  • A book entitled The history of the county palatine and city of Chester with the subtitle "compiled from original evidences in public offices, the Harleian and Cottonian mss., parochial registers, private muniments, unpublished ms. collections of successive Cheshire antiquaries, and a personal survey of every township in the county, incorporated with a re-publication of King's Vale royal and Leycester's Cheshire antiquities" by George Ormerod and others and published in 1819. It has been quoted by WR users interested in families traced before 1600. It is available online as images of the original pages at the Open Library (Google Books) as Vol I, Vol II and Vol III.
  • Unfortunately, the Institute of Historical Research only includes two volumes of the Victoria County History for Cheshire on their website and these only cover the City of Chester. There may be other volumes to this series in print, but a Google Search does not indicate any further volumes online.

Maps

  • Cheshire Archives and Local Studies have organized a facility to compare tithe maps circa 1830 and 19th century Ordnance Survey maps with the modern Ordnance Survey. These are available for every civil parish. A knob in the centre of the screen allows the user to move back and forth between the old and the new view. Use the key on the left to show other possibilities including land ownership.
  • The diagrammatical map of Sanitary Districts in Cheshire showing Civil Parishes 1888 produced by the Ordnance Survey and provided by A Vision of Britain through Time is helpful. "Sanitary Districts" were the predecessors of rural districts and usually followed the same boundaries.
  • The Ordnance Survey map of Cheshire circa 1900 supplied by A Vision of Britain through Time shows invidual settlements as well as parishes.
  • A Vision of Britain through Time provides a series of maps from the Ordnance Survey illustrating the towns and villages of Cheshire and also the borders between parishes. The following group of maps provide views of the county at various dates, illustrating the changes in administrative structure.
This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Farndon, Cheshire. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.