Family:William Black and Sarah Hicklin (1)

Watchers
b. Bet 1735 and 1740 Augusta Co., VA
b. Bet 1738 and 1740 Chester Co., Pennsylvania
d. Bet 21 Sep 1821 and 2 Oct 1821 (BET 21 SEP AND 2 OCT 1821) Morgan Co., Alabama
m. 12 Jan 1763 Augusta County, VA
Facts and Events
Marriage? 12 Jan 1763 Augusta County, VA
Children
BirthDeath
1.
4 Mar 1763 Augusta Co., VA
2.
3.
24 Sep 1859
4.
4 Oct 1772 Augusta Co., VA
5.
3 Nov 1780 Augusta Co., VA
Bet 1811 and 1827 Clark County, Kentucky
6.
3 Feb 1782 Augusta Co., VA
Aft 21 Sep 1821
7.
14 Jul 1786 Augusta Co., VA
8.
1 Dec 1789 Augusta Co., VA

Mt. Sterling is 26 mi NE of Boonesborough, kentucky, founded after Lord Dunsmore's War.

The massacre was one of the first events in what became known as Wm. Black migratedc to KY in 1792

Dunmore's War, a struggle between Virginia and primarily Shawnees of the Ohio Country for control of what is now West Virginia and Kentucky. In the summer of 1774, Boone volunteered to travel with a companion to Kentucky to notify surveyors there about the outbreak of war.


THE WILDERNESS ROAD The road through the Cumberland Gap was not officially named "the Wilderness Road" until 1796 when it was widened enough to allow Conestoga Wagons to travel on it. However, by the time Kentucky had become a state (1792), estimates are that 70,000 settlers had poured into the area through the Cumberland Gap, following this route. The Cumberland Gap was first called Cave Gap by the man who discovered it in 1750--Dr. Thomas Walker. Daniel Boone, whose name is always associated with the Gap, reached it in 1769, passing through it into the Blue Grass region, a hunting ground of Indian tribes. He returned in 1775 with about 30 woodsmen with rifles and axes to mark out a road through the Cumberland Gap, hired for the job by the Transylvania Company. Boone's men completed the blazing of this first trail through the Cumberland Mountains that same year, and established Boonesborough on the Kentucky River. The Wilderness Road connected to the Great Valley Road which came through the Shenandoah Valley from Pennsylvania. Some suggest the origin of the Wilderness Road was at Fort Chiswell (Ft. Chissel) on the Great Valley Road where roads converged from Philadelphia and Richmond. Others claimed the beginning of the road to be at Sapling Grove (today's Bristol, VA) which lay at the extreme southern end of the Great Valley Road since it was at that point that the road narrowed, forcing travelers to abandon their wagons. http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~gentutor/trails.html#Wilderness

In 1775, Henderson called for the creation of a government. By that time Kentucky had four settlements; Harrodsburg, Boonesborogh, Boiling Springs, and Logan's Station

Kentucky voted into the Union on June 1, 1792.

Montgomery County, Kentucky was formed from Clark County after creation on 14 December 1796. Page 644. Fires on 4 Mar 1851 and 2 Dec 1863 destroyed many records.


Clark Co was formed in 1792.

WILLIAM BLACK was born in Augusta County, Virginia, November 3, 1780. When a lad of thirteen he moved, with his parents, to Clark County, Kentucky. In later years he lived on his father's farm on the Salt River in the northern part of what is now Nelson County. In 1811 his name appears on the tax lists of Clark County, so he must have returned to Clark County when his father sold his land in Nelson County in 1806.


?? BLACK'S STATION: before Dec 1794; Fayette Co, on waters of Clear Creeek. http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Ranch/5417/GenReports/stations.htm


Scotch-Irish Settlement in Virginia, Vol. II, Augusta County Court Records, Marriages Lists a William Black m. Jan. 6, 1764


Scottish tradition- 1st b. male is named after the grandfather.


Clark County was formed in 1792 and hence is as old as the State. Bourbon and Fayette Counties contributed to its territory, and Gen. George Rogers Clark its name.

The County is bordered by Bourbon County (north), Montgomery County (northeast), It was the fourteenth county formed, and lies in the central part of the State, on the margin of the famous blue-grass section. http://www.myvirginiagenealogy.com/va_maps/va_cf.htm


Mount Sterling, the seat of Montgomery county, was settled in the late 1700s and was originally known as Little Mountain Town. It was renamed Mount Sterling in 1792 for Stirling, Scotland, the home of one of the town founders. Early History of Mount Sterling, KY

http://mountsterling-ky.com/history.htm Mount Sterling is a small, friendly city steeped in the history of early Kentucky and proud of its heritage. Many sites and buildings in our town are found on state and national historic registers. Through almost 200 years of trial and endeavor, Mount Sterling has grown from an infant born in the wilderness into the progressive, mature city its citizens know today. In the year 1775, Daniel Boone and four of his contemporaries: William Calk, Enoch Smith, Robert Whitledge, and Issac Davis, explored the untouched wilderness at this edge of Central Kentucky. Here, according to legend, bluegrass was first noticed at a salt spring. Because of its geographical location, this area became the Gateway to the Mountains and the Bluegrass. Thus, over a period of time, Mount Sterling was the commercial center for a vast portion of eastern Kentucky. The first cabin in the area was built in June of 1779 for John Kelly and was situated just east of the mound, near a large oak tree. After this at least one crude shelter for hunters was built, but no permanent settlement was made until about 1790. At this time Hugh Forbes, a Scotsman who held a land grant for the area adjoining the Little Mountain, laid off a strip (along what later became Locust Street) into lots to be sold to people who wanted to be near pasture land for their stock.

As the lots were sold and the settlement grew, the people met to decide on a formal name for the place, then called Little Mountain Town. Hugh Forbes, having started it, was allowed to name the town. He selected the name Mount Stirling, for the Little Mountain near which it was established, and Stirling for a town in his native Scotland. Eleven days before the Legislature's establishment of the town of Mount. Sterling, Clark County was created from parts of Fayette and Bourbon Counties. For four years, present-day Montgomery County thus was part of Clark County, whose magistrates soon built a passable wagon trail from Strode's Station to the west to the iron works to the east. Wagon roads also were to be opened to Boonesborough and Paris.

In 1796, Montgomery became the 22nd county created by the Kentucky Legislature. It was named for General Richard Montgomery, an Irishman who was killed in the first volley of the attack on Quebec in 1775. In the beginning, Montgomery County stretched over unpopulated land all the way to the Virginia border. Within a few years, however, other counties had been formed from parts of Montgomery, and it is now one of the smallest of Kentucky's 120 counties.

In 1797, its first year as a county seat, the town's tax lists mention 33 town lots, four retail stores, and three taverns. By 1800, with a population of only 83, Mount Sterling ranked eighteenth in size among Kentucky towns. Ten years later, though the town itself was still small, the area equivalent to today's Montgomery County contained 7000 inhabitants, was agricultural and prosperous, and looked to Mount Sterling as its center. Early Mount Sterling was the trading center for a vast part of Eastern Kentucky. It was the site of several prominent hotels and taverns which served as meeting places, entertainment sites, stagecoach stops, and mail depositories for post riders.

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WILL OF WILLIAM BLACK (2) Recorded at Winchester, KentuckyBook No. 3, page 104

In the name of God Amen, I William Black of Clark County and the State of Kentucky, do make, ordain, publish, and declare this instrument of writing to be my last will and testament. In the first place I commend my soul unto God who gave it, and my body to be intered at the will of my executors hereafter named. Secondly, I will and direct all my just debts to be paid out of my estate. Thirdly, I will and bequeath to my wife Sarah her thirds of my plantation, I now live on, her mare, saddle, bridle, and the third of the milk cattle, bed and sufficient clothing, and her desire of the table furfurniture, also a negro girl named Phillis, to do what she pleases with at her death. Fourthly, William Black to receive four hundred dollars of such pay as I got or may be received for the land I sold on Salt River, which he lived on, which I dont allow him any more with a credit of what he has received and nothing more. Fifthly, I will and bequeath to my sons, Alexander, George, and Robert the value of all the rest of the lands, to be equally divided amongs them with their share of the moovable property with an addition of one bed and furniture to my son Robert. Sixthly, I bequeath to my daughters Margaret, Genney, Rachel and Nancy, four negroes, Spring, Cate, Tom, and Senthe to be sold and equally divided among them four with the equal share of the moovable property. Be it remembered that my will and intention is that the donation aforesaid to Rachel Barns be to the issue of her body, and not to John Barns her husband. And lastly, I constitute and appoint Alexander Black and George Black executors to this my last will and testament. Hereby revoking all other wills and testaments whatsoever. In testimony whereof I the said William Black hath hereunto set my hand and seal this 17th day of November 1806.

William Black

Signed, sealed, published and Declared in the presence of Matthew Patton James Fisher Amelia X Ross

Codicil to the foregoing will of William Black

So far as the sixth bequest relates to my daughter, Rachel Barns, it is my will and desire that my aforesaid executors do purchase good land at their discretion for the amount of her part of the bequest as soon as the amount of the sale is collected and that my said daughter Rachel and her husband may live on it and improve it if they choose until her children come of age, and my executors are hereby further impowered with the consent of said Rachel and her husband to sell any lands so purchased and buy other land with the amount of such sale. In testimony whereof I the said William Black hereunto set my hand and seal this 17th day of Nov. 1806.

William Black

Signed and sealed in the presence of Matthew Patton James Fisher Amelia X. Ross

Appraisement of the estate, Dec. 5, 1811(a few items) Negro girl named Kate 333.33 1/3

 “  boy named Joe450.00
 “  woman named Pring                          300.00
 “  boy named Willy100.00
 “    “       “      Henry                             150.00
 “   girl named Phillis350.00

5 horses 180.00 Total appraisement2167.58 1/2

Alexander Fisher Robert Cunningham Thomas Goff Presented at Court held Aug. 24, 1812

A few items from the sale bill.

To Robert Cunningham 1122 acres @@ $18.2025.00 To Adam Kiser negro woman named Kate 400.00 To Robert Cunningham negro boy named Joe510.00 To John Peebles negro woman Prange 282.00 To John Peebles negro boy Billy166.00 To John Peebles negro boy Henry 250.00

Presented at Court held Jan. 24, 1814


http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/va/augusta/court/or17-207.txt

FEBRUARY 15, 1780.

(Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish Settlement in Virginia

Volume I AUGUSTA COUNTY COURT RECORDS. ORDER BOOK No. XVII.

MAY 21, 1779.

(183) John Kinkead allowed certificate for 50 acres for services as a soldier in Capt. Wm. Preston's Company of Rangers. Major Andrew Lockridge, guardian of orphan of Robert Graham, deceased, is allowed certificate for land for Graham's services as a soldier in Capt. Preston's Company, 1758. (183) Following allowed certificates for land for military services: John Kinkead, Thomas Hicklin, Robert Gwin, Lofftus Pullin, William Black, Patrick Miller, William Jackson, in Capt. Wm. Preston's Company of Rangers, 1758. Wm. Kinkead, Thomas Kinkead, John Montgomery, of Capt. Lewis's Company, Boquet's Expedition, 1764.


Virginia Colonial Militia 1651-1776 Edited by William Armstrong Crozier, Baltimore 1954

56 VIRGINIA COLONIAL MILITIA Benj. Row, entitled to 50 acres of land under King’s Proc. of 1763. jan., 1774. Dunmore. John Kinkead, soldier in late war in Capt. Wm. Preston’s Co. of Rangers, in 1758, Augusta Co., Feb. i5. ii8o. Win. Jackson, soldier in late war in Capt. Wm. Preston’s Co. of Rangers, in 1758. Augusta Co., Feb. 15, 1780. Loiftus Pullen, soldier in late war in Capt. Win. Preston’s Co. of Rangers, in 1758. Augusta Co., Feb. 15, 1780. Robert Gwinn, soldier in late war in Capt. Win. Preston’s Co. of Rangers, in 1758. Augusta Co., Feb. 15, 1780. John Carlile, soldier in late war in Capt. Wm. Preston’s Co. of Rangers, in 1758. Augusta Co., Jan. io, 1780. Wm. Black, soldier in late war in Capt. Wm. Preston’s Co. of Rangers, 1758. Augusta Co., Feb. 15, 1780. Thos. Hicklin, soldier in late war in Capt. Wm. Preston’s Co. of Rangers, in 1758. Augusta Co., Feb. 15, 1780. Robt. Graham, decd., soldier in late war in Capt. Win. Preston’s Co. of Rangers in 1758. Major Andrew Lockridge, guard. of orphans of Robt. Graham, decd. Augusta Co., Feb. i5, 1780. Thomas Kinkead, soldier in late war in Capt. Lewis’ Co. in the expedition commanded by Col. Bouquet, in 1764. Augusta Co., Feb. 15, 1780. Win. Kinkead, soldier in late war in Capt. Lewis’ Co. in the expedition commanded by Col. Bouquet, in 1764. Augusta Co., Feb. 15, 1780. Stephen Handcock, soldier in Col. Byrd’s Regt. in 1760. Kentucky Co., Feb. I, 1780. Uriah Humphries, soldier in last war in Capt. Posey’s Co. of Regulars, till properly discharged. Botetourt Co., March, 1780. John Nixon, entitled to 200 acres of land as a Sergt., agreeable to Proc. of 1763. Williamsburg, April i6, 1774. Dunmore. William Brock, soldier in Capt. Wm. Phillip’s Co. of Rangers, in 1763. Louisa Co., Feb. 14, 1780. Littleberry Lane, soldier in Col. Byrd’s Regt., I1 1758. Orange Co., March 23, 1780. Henry Shackleford, soldier in Capt. Hogg’s Co. of Rangers, in 1758. Orange Co., Nov. 25, 1779. Patrick Fisher, Sergt. in Col. Byrd’s Regt. Orange Co., March 23, 1780. Bartelott Goodman, soldier in Capt. Thos. Bullitt’s Co. of Rangers, in 1762. Louisa Co., Nov. 8, 1779. John Dalton, soldier in Capt. Thos. Bullitt’s Co. of Rangers, in 1762. Louisa Co., Nov. 8, 1779.


LAND BOUNTY CERTIFICATES 55 James Lockhart, soldier in Capt. Alexr. Sayer’s Co. of Rangers before 1763, until discharged. Greenbrier Co., March 21, 1780. Wm. Hamilton, soldier in Capt. John Dickson’s (Dickerson’s?) Co. of Rangers in 1758 and 1759, until same was discharged. Greenbrier Co., March 21, 1780. Chas. Poor, soldier in the Va. Regt. under Col. Byrd, sometime in year 1759. Westmoreland Co., Feb., 1780. George Mothershead, soldier in 2d Va. Regt. under Col. Byrd, in Westmoreland Co., March, 1780. Wm. Wright, Win. Provo, Vincent Rollins and Robt. Sherington, soldiers in 2d Va. Regt. in Capt. Hancock Eustace’s Co., of which I was Lieut. during the campaign of 1750. (Signed) Chas. Mynu Thurston, Frederick Co., Oct. II, 1774. Thos. Shiflett, soldier in 2d Va. Regt. in late war between Great Britain and France. Albemarle Co., April 13, 1780. Edwd. Wilkerson, entitled to 200 acres of land as Sergt. in late war, agreeble to Proc. of 1763. Williamsburg, April 28, 1774. Dunmore. Edmond Bacon, entitled to 200 acres of land as Corpi. in last war, according to Proc. of 1763. Williamsburg, May 29, 1774. Dunmore. John Bowyer, entitled to 2,000 acres of land, agreeable to Proc. of 1763. Williamsburg, April 20, 1774. Dunmore. Peter Brannan, served in Capt. Stewart’s Co. of Rangers last war as — until properly discharged. Botetourt Co., March, 1780. William Holly, soldier in Capt. Gist’s Co. of Light Infantry last war, till properly discharged. Botetourt Co., March, 1780. Robt. Hutcheson, Sergt. in Capt. Claiton’s Co. of Penna. Regulars last war at the reduction of Fort Pitt. Botetourt Co., March, 1780. David Fream, soldier in Capt. Christian’s Co. of Regulars in last war, till properly discharged. Botetourt Co., Dec., ‘779. Augustine Bromley, soldier in Capt. Blagg’s Regular Co. last war, till properly discharged. Botetourt Co., March 9, 1780. James Cooper, soldier in Capt. Gist’s Co. of Light Infantry last war, till properly discharged. Botetourt Co., March, 1780. Julius Webb, soldier in Capt. Throgmorton’s Co. of Regulars in last war, till properly discharged. Botetourt Co., March, 1780. Joshua Cox, soldier in Capt. John Smith’s Co. of Regulars in expedition of 176o, under command of Col. Byrd, till end of campaign. Montgomery Co., April, 1780. Richard Janet, entitled to 200 acres of land, agreeable to Proc. of 1763. Williamsburg, Feb. 14, 1774. Dunmore. Saml. Hamilton, entitled to 200 acres of land for services as Sergt, agreeable to King’s Proc. of 1763. Williamsburg, Jan. 31, ‘774. Dunmore.

 ***  Patrick Miller, soldier in late war between Great Britain and France in Capt. Win. Preston’s Co. of Rangers in 1758. Augusta Co., Feb. 1, 1780. 

Waddell's Annals of Augusta County, Virginia, from 1726 to 1871 [Waddell's Annals Home] - Chapter 4: Indian Wars, etc., from 1753 to 1756 - Page 120

http://www.roanetnhistory.org/bookread.php?loc=WaddellsAnnals&pgid=132#section23 WILLIAM PRESTON was the only son of John Preston, and was born in Ireland in 1730. He was therefore about ten years old when he came with his father to the Valley. For most of his education he was indebted to the Rev. John Craig, near whose residence he lived, according to the testimony of his daughter, Mrs. Floyd. His first regular appointment was posting the books of the Staunton merchants and aiding his uncle, Col. Patton, in his extensive business. He was deputy for Wallace Estill, when the latter was High Sheriff of Augusta. He was also clerk of the Vestry of Augusta Parish and clerk of the Court-Martial of the county. Step by step he rose to higher employments. During the Indian wars he became quite prominent as captain of a company of rangers, and many of the letters of Governor Dinwiddie in that stirring time were addressed to him. When the town of Staunton was incorporated in 1761, he was one of the board of trustees. In the same year he married Susanna Smith, of Hanover county. He represented Augusta in the House of Burgesses in 1766-1768-’9, and was probably a member from Botetourt in 1774. Upon the formation of Botetourt in 1767, he removed to that section, and was one of the first justices of that county. At the first court he qualified also as county surveyor, coroner, escheator and colonel of militia. His residence was at a place called Greenfield, near Amsterdam. Fincastle county was formed in 1772, and Colonel Preston became its first surveyor. In 1773, he acquired the Draper’s Meadows estate, removed his family there in 1774, and changed the name to Smithfield. He intended to accompany Colonel William Christian in his march to the Ohio, in the fall of 1774, but was detained at home by his wife’s condition. The child born to him at that time was James Preston, who became Governor of Virginia. In 1780 {typo corrected}, Colonel Preston was engaged with Colonel Arthur Campbell and Colonel Christian in their respective expeditions against the Cherokees. The legislature of North Carolina included him with Colonel Campbell in a vote of thanks for their services in protecting the frontier. Throughout the war of the Revolution he was actively employed, holding important command in Southwest Virginia, and his official papers show that he was a man of more than ordinary culture. He died at Smithfield in 1783, leaving eleven children, of whom five were sons. One of his sons, General Francis Preston, married the only daughter of General William Campbell, and was the father of William C. Preston of South Carolina.

Colonel Preston was taken ill at a regimental muster, June 28, 1783, and died the following night. He was five feet, eleven inches in height, inclined to corpulency, of ruddy complexion, with light hair and hazel eyes. His wife survived till June 18, 1823, having lived a widow forty years.

Several accounts of this numerous and prominent family are already in print, and therefore the subject is not pursued further here.