Place:Washington, Virginia, United States

Contained Places
Cemetery
Barker Cemetery
Bethel Presbyterian Church Cemetery
Old Glade Spring Presbyterian Church Cemetery
Old Moore Cemetery
Rock Spring Cemetery
Sinking Spring Cemetery
Walnut Grove Cemetery
Census-designated place
Emory-Meadow View
Inhabited place
Abingdon
Alum Wells
Alvarado
Ashleys
Azen
Barker Mill
Benhams
Big Hill
Big Moccasin
Blacksburg
Blackwell
Brumley Gap
Buffalo Ford
Burson Place
Butts
Cedar Bluff
Cedarville
Clinchburg
Craigs Mill
Creek Junction
Cummings Heights
Damascus
DeBusk Mill
Delmar
Drowning Ford
Duncanville
Emory
Evergreen Hills
Fairview
Fleenor Spring
Fleenors
Fractionville
Friendship
Giesley Mill
Glade Spring
Glenford
Goose Pimple Junction
Green Cove
Green Spring
Greendale
Greenfield
Groseclose Corner
Hanckel
Haskell
Hayters Gap
Henderson
High Meadows
Hilander Park
Holston
Kelley's Chapel
Ketron Corner
Ketron
Keywood
Konnarock
Larwood
Laureldale
Leonard
Lime Hill
Lindell
Litz
Lodi
Loves Mill
Lowland
Malcolm
Masada
McCall Gap
McConnell
McKees Store
Meadowview
Mendota
Mock Mill
Mongle Spring
Morningside Hills
Murrayfield
Neff
Oak Grove
Old Glade Spring
Osceola
Parks Mill
Phillip
Pine Grove
Plasterco
Plum Creek
Powell Valley
Preston Hills
Price Hill
Rappahannock
Rich Valley
Rocktown
Roebuck
Roetown
Rush Corner
Rust Hollow
Saltville
Scott Addition
Shakesville
Shortsville
Snodgrass
Spring Creek
St. Clair
Stone Mill
Stump Fort
Taylors Valley
Three Springs
Tumbling Creek
Vails Mill
Vance Mill
Vestal
Walker Place
Wallace
Walnut Grove
Washington Springs
Watauga
White Mill
Widener Valley
Withers
Wolfrun
Woodsdale
Wyndale
Zenobia
Settlement
Castle's Wood ( 1769 - c1800 )
Wolf Hill Tract


Contents

Image:Washington County.jpg

Description

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Washington County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 54,876. Its county seat is Abingdon.

Washington County is part of the KingsportBristolBristol, TN-VA Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is a component of the Johnson City–Kingsport–Bristol, TN-VA Combined Statistical Area, commonly known as the "Tri-Cities" region.

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

For thousands of years, indigenous peoples of varying cultures lived in the area. At the time of European encounter, the Chiska had a chief village near what is now Saltville, destroyed by the Spaniards in 1568. The Cherokee annexed the region from the Xualae around 1671, and ceded it to the Virginia Colony in 1770 at the Treaty of Lochaber.

The county was formed by Virginians in 1776 from Fincastle County. It was named for George Washington, who was then commander-in-chief of the Continental Army. Washington County is among the first geographical regions to be named after the president of the United States.

Washington County was raided by the Chickamauga Cherokee during the Cherokee–American wars. In July, 1776, Chief Dragging Canoe led an attack on Black's Fort (renamed Abingdon in 1778). The area remained prone to attack until after Chickamauga leader Bob Benge was finally slain by settlers in Washington County in 1794.

As with many other frontier counties, the boundaries and territory changed over the years. In 1786 the northwestern part of Washington County became Russell County. In 1814 the western part of what remained of Washington County was combined with parts of Lee and Russell counties to form Scott County. In 1832 the northeastern part of Washington was combined with part of Wythe County to form Smyth County. Finally, with the incorporation of the town of Goodson as the independent city of Bristol in 1890, Washington County assumed its present size.

Timeline

Date Event Source
1777 County formed Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1777 Court records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1777 Probate records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town SourcesShelby Ireson Edwards abstracted and published Washington Co., VA Will Book 1 (1777-1792) in 1984. Edwards' Will Book 1 is available from New Papyrus Publishing Co. (around $25). Washington Co., VA Will Books 2-10 were recently abstracted and can purchased online from New Papyrus Publishing Co.. Each book is published in a separate volume ($27-$32 each).
1778 Land records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1782 Marriage records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1790 First census Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
1853 Birth records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1980 No significant boundary changes after this year Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990

Population History

source: Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
Census Year Population
1790 5,625
1800 9,536
1810 12,156
1820 12,444
1830 15,614
1840 13,001
1850 14,612
1860 16,892
1870 16,816
1880 25,203
1890 29,020
1900 28,995
1910 32,830
1920 32,376
1930 33,850
1940 38,197
1950 37,536
1960 38,076
1970 40,835
1980 46,487
1990 45,887

Note: Bristol city, formed from Washington County. Annexation after 1970 from Washington (1970 population 4,802).

Research Tips

Sources

source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog



This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Washington County, Virginia. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.