Place:Tuscaloosa, Alabama, United States

NameTuscaloosa
Alt namesTuscaloosasource: Getty Vocabulary Program
Tuskaloosa Countysource: USGS, GNIS Digital Gazetteer (1994) GNIS1029576
Tuskloosa Countysource: USGS, GNIS Digital Gazetteer (1994) GNIS1029576
TypeCounty
Coordinates33.3°N 87.5°W
Located inAlabama, United States     (1823 - )
See alsoFayette, Alabama, United StatesChild county (source: Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990)
Hale, Alabama, United StatesChild county (source: Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990)
Pickens, Alabama, United StatesChild county (source: Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990)
Walker, Alabama, United StatesChild county (source: Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990)
Contained Places
Cemetery
Cannon Family Cemetery
Greenwood Cemetery
Liberty Hill Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery
Moores Bridge Cemetery
Deserted settlement
Sniders Shoal
Inhabited place
Abernant
Academy Drive
Alberta City
Alberta Heights
Alpine Hills
Alta Vista
Altamont
Appling Bend
Arcadia
Arlington Drive
Arrow Wood
Asbury
Audubon Place
Austin
Banks Villa East
Bar Wayne Circle
Batchelor
Beacon Point
Beech Hills
Bellview Heights
Bellwood
Berkley Hills
Bethany
Beverley Heights
Binion Heights
Birdway Drive
Biscayne Hills
Box Springs
Brentwood
Briarcliff
Briarwood
Bridgeview
Broadview
Brookhaven
Brookmeade
Brooksdale
Brookside
Brookwood
Brownville
Buckhead
Bucksville
Buena Vista
Buhl
Bull City
Burchfield
Burks Garden
Burnt Pine
Caffee Junction
Camellia Park
Camile Terrace
Candlelight Terrace
Candlewood
Canyon Lakes
Capstone Court
Carolwood
Carriage Lane
Carter
Cedar Cove
Cedar Crest
Cedar Knoll
Chambers
Chamblee
Chapelwood
Cherokee Hills
Cherokee Shores
Cherry Dale
Cherrywood
Chestnut Hill
Chewalla
Claymont
Clearview Hills
Cloester Valley
Cloverdale
Clyde Jones
Coaling
Coker
College Hills
Colonial Hills
Colony Hills
Cottondale
Cottonwood Park
Country Club Gables
Country Club Hills
Cove Park
Coventry
Covey Chase
Cresent Heights
Crestdale
Crestmont
Crestview
Crestwood
Cumberland Park
Dearing Place
Deep Wood
Deerfield
Demarest
Deven Dale
Dixon Manor
Docray
Dowdle
Druid Hills
Dudley
Dunbrook
Duncanville
Durrett Grove
Dutton Place
East Arlington
East Brookwood
East Circle
East End
East Lake
East Park
Eastern Hills
Eastover
Eastwood Villa
Echo Hill
Echola
Edwardian Place
El Dorado East
Elm Ridge
Elrod
Englewood
Fairlawn
Fairway Drive
Fernridge
Fernwood
Fitts Heights
Flatwoods
Fleetwood
Forest Hills
Forest Lake
Forest Manor
Forestasia
Fosters
Four Winds
Fox Run
Gardendale
Georgena Terrace
Glendale Gardens
Glenwood Park
Golden Acres
Gorgas
Graceland Acres
Green Grove
Green Hills
Green Valley
Greenbriar
Greenview
Grimes
Guilds Woods
Hagler
Happy Acres
Harper
Harperwood
Hays Court
Hazelhurst
Heritage Hills
Hickory Forest
High Cliff
High Forest
High Point
Hightown
Highview
Hillcrest
Hillsdale
Hillswood
Hillview
Holiday Shores
Hollywood Park
Holman
Holt
Howton
Huntington Place
Huntland
Hurricane Hills
Idlewood
Indian Hills
Indian Lake
Ingleside Village
Jerusalem Heights
Juanita Drive
Judson Park
Keenewood
Kellerman
Kennedy Park
Kicker
Kimbrell
Kings Acres
Klondike
Kyles
La Vera
Lake Cove
Lake Forest
Lake Front Village
Lake Hills North
Lake Shore
Lake View
Lakeland Forest
Lakeridge
Lakeview Manor
Lakewood
Laurel Hills
Lavelle Woods
Lavender Acres
Lincoln Park
Little Sandy
Livingston
Loganwood
Lynwood Park
Mariners Cove
Maxwell
Mayfair
McKenzie Courts
McPherson Landing
Meadow Lawn
Meadowbrook
Mimosa Highlands
Mimosa Manor
Monte Vista
Monterey Drive
Monticello Two
Moores Bridge
Mount Olive
New Lexington
Nichol Hills
Norris Circle
North Alabama Junction
North Haven
North River Shores
North Riviera
North Valley Acres
Northcliff
Northcrest
Northport
Northwood Forest
Northwood Lake
Oak Grove
Oak Ridge
Oakdale
Old Mill Trace
Oliver Heights
Oxford Gate
Parkside
Parkview
Parkwood
Pattersontown
Patton Place
Peach Grove
Pearson
Peterson
Phalin
Pine Hills
Pine Park
Pinedale
Pinehurst
Poes Acres
Princeton Heights
Princeton Place
Raintree Country
Ralph
Reston Place
Ridgeland
Riverchase
Riverdale
Riverside Circle
Robinwood
Rollingwood
Romulus
Rosedale Courts
Rosedale
Roselawn
Rosewood
Royal Pines
Running Brook
Sahama Village
Samantha
Sandtown
Sartains Ridgecrest
Searcy Farms
Searles
Sherwood Forest
Sherwood
Simpson
Sky Ranch
Skyland Manor
Skyland Park
Smith Acres
Smoke Rise
Snow Terrace
Sommerville
South Holt Highlands
South Holt
South Park
Southwood
Spring Brook
Springhill Lake
Standridge
Stokes
Stonehedge Cliffs
Stonehedge
Summerfield
Sutton Place
Sycamore
Sylvan
Tannehill
Taylor Circle
Taylorville Heights
Taylorville
Telmar
Terri Wood
The Downs
The Glens
The Highlands
The Staffords
The Vineyards
Three Forks
Timberlane
Tuscaloosa ( 1816 - )
Twin Manor
University Lane
University Manor
University Place
Valley View
Vance
Vestavia East
Vestavia Hills
Vista Granda
Walker
Warrior Heights
Washington Square
Wensa Place
West Circle
West Haven
Western Plains
Westridge
Westview
Whispering Hills
Whitson
Wiley
Willow Point
Windham Springs
Windsor Drive
Wood Manor
Wood Ridge
Wood Village
Wood Villas
Woodland Forest
Woodland Hills
Woodland Park
Woodland Pines
Woodland Terrace
Woodmont
Woodstock Junction
Yacht Club Bay
Yolande
Unknown
Kaulton
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Tuscaloosa County is a county in the west central portion of the U.S. state of Alabama. As of the 2010 census, its population was 194,656 (estimated at 206,102 in 2016 by the United States Census Bureau). Its county seat and largest city is Tuscaloosa, the former state capital from 1826 to 1845.[1] The county is named in honor of Tuskaloosa, a paramount chief of the Mississippian culture, who are considered ancestors of the historic Choctaw people of the region.[1]

Tuscaloosa County is included in the Tuscaloosa, AL Metropolitan Statistical Area. The county is the home of the University of Alabama, Shelton State Community College, and Stillman College.

Contents

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Tuscaloosa County was established on February 6, 1818. During the antebellum years, the principal crop was cotton, cultivated and processed by African-American slaves. By 1860, shortly before the state seceded from the Union, the county had a total of 12,971 whites, 84 "free" African Americans, and 10,145 African-American slaves; the latter comprised 43.7 percent of the total population. The war brought significant changes, including migration out of the county by some African Americans.[2] Some freedmen moved to nearby counties and larger cities for more opportunities and to join with other freedmen in communities less subject to white supervision and intimidation.[2]

Following Reconstruction, there was violence as whites struggled to regain control of the state legislature. It reached a height in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Tuscaloosa County had a total of 10 documented lynchings of African Americans, according to a 2015 study by the Equal Justice Initiative.

Following passage by Alabama of the 1901 constitution that disenfranchised most African Americans and tens of thousands of poor whites, the state legislature passed laws to impose Jim Crow and racial segregation. Due to this oppression and problems of continued violence by lynchings, many African Americans left Alabama in two waves of the Great Migration in the first half of the 20th century. They went to Northern and Midwestern industrial cities. Their mass departure from Tuscaloosa County is reflected in the lower rates of county population growth from 1910 to 1930, and from 1950 to 1970. (see Census Table below.)

Blacks by 1960 represented 28.7% of the county population and they were still disenfranchised throughout the state. African Americans were active in demonstrations and other civil rights activities in the city of Tuscaloosa in the 1960s, seeking desegregation of public facilities, including the county courthouse. After passage of the federal Voting Rights Act of 1965, African Americans in the state regained their ability to exercise their constitutional right to vote and participate in the political system. Politics in the state have shifted since they recovered the vote. They have generally supported the Democratic Party, which on the national level had supported the civil rights movement.

While the county population has increased considerably since 1960, African Americans still comprise slightly less than one third of the total. In 2015, one of the four elected Tuscaloosa County Commissioners is African American.

Since the late 20th century, by contrast, white conservatives in Alabama and other southern states have essentially shifted to supporting Republican Party candidates, particularly for statewide and national offices.

In the 21st century, the principal agricultural products have included hay, corn, cotton, soybeans, wheat and snapdragons.[1] Major companies in the county have included JVC, Mercedes-Benz U.S. International, Uniroyal-Goodrich, and Phifer Inc.[1]

Major tornado incidents

1932

On March 21, 1932, a F4 tornado hit the Tuscaloosa–Northport area in Tuscaloosa County. This storm was part of a massive tornado outbreak over March 21–22, 1932, spawning at least 36 tornadoes which killed more than 330 people and injuring 2,141. Alabama was hardest hit, with 268 fatalities.

1998

On April 8, 1998, an F3 tornado struck northeast of Tuscaloosa. This windstorm injured two people and destroyed five homes and 11 mobile homes. It rotated from Holman to north of Northport. Thirty-seven homes were also damaged. Moments later, a separate F5 tornado struck northeastern Tuscaloosa near the Black Warrior River before entering western Jefferson County, where it caused 32 deaths.

2000

On December 16, 2000, an F4 rated tornado hit communities south and east of Tuscaloosa, centering in the Bear Creek and Hillcrest Meadows areas. The tornado caused the deaths of 11 people while injuring over 125 others. It was the strongest tornado to hit Alabama in the month of December since 1950 and the strongest of a moderate tornado outbreak that took place across the Southeastern corner of the United States from Mississippi to North Carolina. Damage was estimated at over $12 million. More than 40 houses and 70 mobile homes were completely destroyed, with hundreds more seriously damaged.

2011

On April 27, 2011, Tuscaloosa was hit by a half-mile (800 m) wide tornado, which was part of the 2011 Super Outbreak. It resulted in at least 44 deaths in the city, over 1000 injuries, and massive devastation. Officials at DCH Hospital (alone) in Tuscaloosa reported treating more than 1000 injured people in the first several days of the tornado aftermath. Mayor Maddox was quoted saying that "We have neighborhoods that have been basically removed from the map."

On April 29, President Barack Obama, upon touring the tornado damage in Tuscaloosa, said "I have never seen devastation like this".

Timeline

Date Event Source
1820 First census Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
1821 Probate records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1823 County formed Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1823 Land records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1823 Marriage records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1870 No significant boundary changes after this year Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
1880 Birth records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources

Population History

source: Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
Census Year Population
1820 8,229
1830 13,646
1840 16,583
1850 18,056
1860 23,200
1870 20,081
1880 24,957
1890 30,352
1900 36,147
1910 47,559
1920 53,680
1930 64,153
1940 76,036
1950 94,092
1960 109,047
1970 116,029
1980 137,541
1990 150,522

Cemeteries

Cemeteries of Tuscaloosa County, Alabama, United States

Research Tips

Rockcastle, also known as Davis Creek, in Tuscaloosa County on the Abernant Loop Road (Lat. 33.2790041 Long: -87.2174978) is included in the Ghost Town USA's Guide to the Ghost Towns of Alabama, hosted on RootsWeb.


This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Tuscaloosa County, Alabama. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.