Place:Saxonburg, Butler, Pennsylvania, United States

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NameSaxonburg
TypeBorough
Coordinates40.754°N 79.816°W
Located inButler, Pennsylvania, United States
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Saxonburg is a borough (comparable to a town) in Butler County, Pennsylvania in the United States. It is part of the Pittsburgh metropolitan area in the western part of the state. It was founded in 1832 by F. Carl Roebling and his younger brother John A. Roebling as a German farming colony. The population of Saxonburg was 1,525 as of the 2010 census.

The city was first named "Germania" and "Sachsenburg" before its name was anglicized to the present one. After Roebling returned to his engineering career, he developed his innovation of wire rope in a workshop here. He became known for his design of suspension bridges, including the most famous one, the Brooklyn Bridge in New York.

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History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Founded in 1832 by Friedrich Carl Roebling and his younger brother John A. Roebling, the frontier farming community was initially called "Germania". This was changed to "Sachsenburg" and later anglicized to Saxonburg. Roebling had emigrated with his brother Carl and a group of pioneers from Prussia (Germany) in 1831 to flee political unrest and oppression. The two men, along with a handful of a larger group who accompanied them on the trans-Atlantic journey, bought of land on October 28, 1831, from Mrs. Sarah Collins.

After a few years, Roebling left farming to return to his career as an engineer. He developed a way to produce wire rope or cable, and used it in several of his projects, beginning with an aqueduct. He produced the wire rope at a workshop on his property in Saxonburg. He designed several suspension bridges, including two in Pittsburgh and one in Philadelphia. His most famous is his Brooklyn Bridge in New York. The Roebling Museum in the borough maintains several artifacts of his notable career.

In November 1920, KDKA radio, regarded as the world's first commercial radio station, began broadcasting from East Pittsburgh. Later it located its transmitter in neighboring Clinton Township of Butler County.

Nuclear lab

In 1946, Fred Seitz, head of the physics department at Carnegie Tech, recruited Ed Creutz, Jack Fox, Roger Sutton and Bert Corben to the university to develop an important nuclear physics research program. By June 6, 1946, they had built a leading-edge, 450 MeV proton synchrocyclotron at the Nuclear Research Center near Saxonburg, just south of the city limits. The research program flourished up to the mid-1970s. By then the accelerator had become obsolete and was dismantled. The site was converted to industrial purposes, and is now occupied by II-VI Corporation. As of 1997, only one or two of the original Nuclear Research Center buildings remained intact, including the original laboratory building.


Murder of Police Chief Adams

On the afternoon of December 4, 1980, career criminal Donald Eugene Webb was the chief suspect in the murder of the borough police chief Gregory Adams in Saxonburg. This was the first homicide in the borough's nearly 150-year history and received national attention, especially as Webb was never apprehended. Webb was put on the FBI Most Wanted List, but was never captured. After the FBI found new evidence in her house in 2016, in July 2017, his wife Lillian Webb confessed to hiding her husband for 17 years, and led the FBI and police to his remains buried in the yard of her Massachusetts house. He died in 1999 after a series of strokes, at the approximate age of 68.

First woman mayor

In November 2009, Jody Pflueger was elected as mayor as a write-in candidate, defeating the 12-year incumbent. She is both the city's first Democratic and first female mayor. While in office, Mayor Pflueger had the position of Police Chief reinstated in the small city. Pflueger was succeeded by Pamela Bauman in 2013, who died in office. William Gillespie was elected in a special election to complete Bauman's term until 2017.

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