Place:Morocco

Watchers


NameMorocco
Alt namesAl-Magrebsource: Getty Vocabulary Program
al-Mamlakah al-Maghribīyahsource: Britannica Book of the Year (1993) p 674; Webster's Geographical Dictionary (1984) p 792
French Moroccosource: Family History Library Catalog
Ifnisource: Family History Library Catalog
Kingdom of Moroccosource: Wikipedia
Magrebsource: Rand McNally Atlas (1994) p 319
Marocsource: UN Terminology Bulletin (1993) p 68
Marokkosource: Cassell's German Dictionary (1982) p 408
Marrocossource: Rand McNally Atlas (1994) p 319
Marruecossource: UN Terminology Bulletin (1993) p 68
Spanish Moroccosource: Family History Library Catalog
Spanish Saharasource: Family History Library Catalog
TypeCountry
Coordinates32°N 5°W
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Morocco, officially the Kingdom of Morocco, is a country located in the Maghreb region of North West Africa with an area of . Its capital is Rabat, the largest city Casablanca. It overlooks the Mediterranean Sea to the north and the Atlantic Ocean to the west. Morocco claims the areas of Ceuta, Melilla and Peñón de Vélez de la Gomera, all of them under Spanish jurisdiction.

Since the foundation of the first Moroccan state by Idris I in 788 AD, the country has been ruled by a series of independent dynasties, reaching its zenith under the Almoravid and Almohad dynasties, spanning parts of Iberia and northwestern Africa. The Marinid and Saadi dynasties continued the struggle against foreign domination, allowing Morocco to remain the only northwest African country to avoid Ottoman occupation. The Alaouite dynasty, which rules to this day, seized power in 1631. In 1912, Morocco was divided into French and Spanish protectorates, with an international zone in Tangier. It regained its independence in 1956, and has since remained comparatively stable and prosperous by regional standards.

Morocco claims the non-self-governing territory of Western Sahara, formerly Spanish Sahara, as its Southern Provinces. After Spain agreed to decolonise the territory to Morocco and Mauritania in 1975, a guerrilla war arose with local forces. Mauritania relinquished its claim in 1979, and the war lasted until a cease-fire in 1991. Morocco currently occupies two thirds of the territory, and peace processes have thus far failed to break the political deadlock.

The unitary sovereign state of Morocco is a constitutional monarchy with an elected parliament. The King of Morocco holds vast executive and legislative powers, especially over the military, foreign policy and religious affairs. Executive power is exercised by the government, while legislative power is vested in both the government and the two chambers of parliament, the Assembly of Representatives and the Assembly of Councillors. The king can issue decrees called dahirs, which have the force of law. He can also dissolve the parliament after consulting the Prime Minister and the president of the constitutional court.

Morocco's predominant religion is Islam, and its official languages are Arabic and Berber; the latter became an official language in 2011, and was the native language of Morocco before the Muslim conquest in the seventh century C.E. The Moroccan dialect of Arabic, referred to as Darija, and French are also widely spoken. Moroccan culture is a blend of Berber, Arab, Sephardi Jews, West African and European influences.

Morocco is a member of the Arab League, the Union for the Mediterranean and the African Union. It has the fifth largest economy of Africa.

Contents

How places in Morocco are organized

All places in Morocco

Further information on historical place organization in Morocco

Research Tips


This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Morocco. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.