Place:Market Weighton, East Riding of Yorkshire, England

Watchers
NameMarket Weighton
Alt namesWeighton-Marketsource: Family History Library Catalog
Wicstunsource: Domesday Book (1985) p 307
TypeTown, Civil parish
Coordinates53.851°N 0.677°W
Located inEast Riding of Yorkshire, England     ( - 1974)
Also located inYorkshire, England    
Humberside, England     (1974 - 1996)
East Riding of Yorkshire, England     (1996 - )
See alsoPocklington Rural, East Riding of Yorkshire, Englandrural district in which the parish was situated 1894-1974
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Market Weighton is a small town and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is one of the main market towns in the East Yorkshire Wolds and lies midway between Hull and York, about from either one. According to the 2011 UK census, Market Weighton parish had a population of 6,429, an increase on the 2001 UK census figure of 5,212.

The 19th-century English lexicographer Sir William Smith proposed Market Weighton as the location of the still-undiscovered Roman camp of Delgovicia. Historically the town was listed in the Domesday Book as "Wicstun" and was granted its charter to become a market town in 1251. Notable architecture includes: a parish church, parts of which are Norman, the Londesborough Arms (an 18th-century coaching inn), a Wesleyan chapel, a Methodist chapel and a high street still recognisable from the 19th century. Other sights of interest include the post office, the duck pond and Station Farm. Market Weighton history includes William Bradley, the Yorkshire Giant who at the age of 20 was tall. In May of each year local residents take to the streets of Market Weighton for the Giant Community Day (formerly Giant Bradley Day) festival in a celebration of the life and times of William Bradley.

Industry in the town is largely based on agriculture. The town is known geologically for having given its name to the Market Weighton Axis.

The Yorkshire Wolds Way National Trail, a long distance footpath, passes through the town.

Humberside 1974-1996

In 1974 most of what had been the East Riding of Yorkshire was joined with the northern part of Lincolnshire to became a new English county named Humberside. The urban and rural districts of the former counties were abolished and Humberside was divided into non-metropolitan districts. The new organization did not meet with the pleasure of the local citizenry and Humberside was wound up in 1996. The area north of the River Humber was separated into two "unitary authorities"—Kingston upon Hull covering the former City of Hull and its closest environs, and the less urban section to the west and to the north which, once again, named itself the East Riding of Yorkshire.

The phrase "Yorkshire and the Humber" serves no purpose in WeRelate. It refers to one of a series of basically economic regions established in 1994 and abolished for most purposes in 2011. See the Wikipedia article entited "Regions of England").


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This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Market Weighton. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.