Place:Heytesbury, Wiltshire, England

Watchers
NameHeytesbury
Alt namesTytheringtonsource: former civil parish now part of Heytesbury
Imbersource: former civil parish now part of Heytesbury
Knooksource: former civil parish now part of Heytesbury
TypeParish (ancient), Civil parish
Coordinates51.183°N 2.109°W
Located inWiltshire, England
See alsoHeytesbury Hundred, Wiltshire, Englandhundred in which it was located
Warminster Rural, Wiltshire, Englandrural district, 1894 - 1934
Warminster and Westbury Rural, Wiltshire, Englandrural district, 1934 - 1974
West Wiltshire District, Wiltshire, England1974-2009
Wiltshire District, Wiltshire, England2009--
source: Family History Library Catalog
source: Family History Library Catalog
source: Family History Library Catalog
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is based on an article in Wikipedia

Heytesbury is a village (formerly considered to be a town) and a civil parish in Wiltshire, England. The village lies on the north bank of the Wylye, about 3 1⁄2 miles (5.6 km) southeast of the town of Warminster.

Heytesbury has included most of the small neighbouring settlement of Tytherington since the mid-19th century, and the deserted village of Imber since the end of World War II. The former neighbouring parish of Knook is also covered in this article. Normally all places that were civil parishes in 1900 are covered in separate articles, but here the articles have been combined because the information on the precise relationship between Heytesbury, Tytherington, Imber and Knook between 1894 and 1974 is quite hazy. In each case quotations from both the Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales of 1870-72 and from Wikipedia have been provided. Wikipedia expands on the 20th century history of Imber. It is worth looking at the Ordnance Survey map of 1900 to see the relative locations of the parishes.

Contents

Tytherington

A Vision of Britain through Time provides the following description of Imber from John Marius Wilson's Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales of 1870-72:

"TYTHERINGTON, a parish in Warminster district, Wilts; 1 mile S by W of Heytesbury [railway] station. Post town, Warminster. Acres: 1,650. Real property: £1,137. Population: 111. Houses: 23. The living is a curacy in the diocese of Salisbury. Value: not reported. Patron: the Bishop of [Salisbury]."
the text in this section is based on an article in Wikipedia

Tytherington is a small village in Wiltshire, in the southwest of England. It lies on the south side of the Wylye valley, about 3 1⁄2 miles (6 km) southeast of the town of Warminster and 1 mile (1.6 km) southwest of the larger village of Heytesbury. Most of the village is now part of the civil parish of Heytesbury although a few houses in the west are within the parish of Sutton Veny.

Imber

A Vision of Britain through Time provides the following description of Imber from John Marius Wilson's Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales of 1870-72:

"IMBER, a parish in Warminster district, Wilts; in Salisbury plain, 4 ½ miles NE by N of Heytesbury [railway] station, and 6½ ENE of Warminster. Post town: Heytesbury, under Bath. Acres: 3,033. Real property: £2,616. Population: 382. Houses: 85. The property is subdivided. The living is a vicarage in the diocese of Salisbury. Value: £120. Patron: the Marquis of Bath. The church contains two effigies of Knights Templars, and is good. There are a Baptist chapel and a national school.
the text in this section is based on an article in Wikipedia

Imber is an uninhabited village in part of the British Army's training grounds on the Salisbury Plain in Wiltshire, England. It is situated in an isolated area of the Plain, about 2.5 miles (4 km) west of the A360 road between Tilshead and West Lavington. The entire civilian population was evicted in 1943 to provide an exercise area for American troops preparing for the invasion of Europe during the Second World War. After the war, villagers were not allowed to return to their homes. The village, which is now part of the civil parish of Heytesbury, remains under the control of the Ministry of Defence despite several attempts by former residents to return. Non-military access is limited to several open days a year.

Knook

A Vision of Britain through Time provides the following description of Knook from John Marius Wilson's Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales of 1870-72:

"KNOOK, a parish, with a village, in Warminster district, Wilts; on the river Wiley, the Old Ditch way, and the Somerset and Weymouth railway, 1 mile SE of Heytesbury [railway] station. Post town: Heytesbury, under Bath. Acres: 1,440. Real property: £1,342. Population: 208. Houses: 46. The property belongs chiefly to Lord Heytesbury.
"Knook Castle is an ancient single ditched entrenchment, of about 2 acres; is supposed to have been originally a British village, and afterwards a Roman summer camp; and has yielded Roman coins. Traces of another ancient British village are to the N. 'The site of these villages,' says Sir R.Hoare, 'is decidedly marked by great cavities and a black soil; and the attentive eye may easily trace out the lines of houses and the streets, or rather the hollow ways, conducting to them. Numerous tumuli and barrows are in the neighbourhood.' The living is a [perpetual] curacy, annexed to the [perpetual] curacy of Heytesbury, in the diocese of Salisbury. The church, in August 1866, was about to be repaired."
the text in this section is based on an article in Wikipedia

Knook is a small village and civil parish in Wiltshire, England. The village lies on the east bank of the River Wylye at the edge of Salisbury Plain, about 4 miles (6.4 km) southeast of Warminster, on the A36 road to Salisbury.

The parish includes Knook Camp, an accommodation centre for the Salisbury Plain military training area, part of the Defence Training Estate.

Research Tips

A collection of online source references will be found on the county page for Wiltshire.

This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Heytesbury. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.
This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Tytherington. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.
This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Imber. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.
This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Knook. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.