Place:Haiphong, Haiphong, Vietnam

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NameHaiphong
Alt namesHải Phòngsource: Wikipedia
Hai Phòngsource: Getty Vocabulary Program
Hai-phongsource: Rand McNally Atlas (1989) I-69
Häi Phongsource: NIMA, GEOnet Names Server (1996-1998)
Hǎifángsource: Wikipedia
TypeCity
Coordinates20.867°N 106.683°E
Located inHaiphong, Vietnam
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Haiphong is a major industrial city, the second largest city in the northern part of Vietnam, and third largest city overall in Vietnam. Hai Phong is also the center of technology, economy, culture, medicine, education, science and trade in the northern coast of Vietnam.

Hai Phong city traces its origin to its 1887 founding as a seaport province by colonist of the French Colonial Empire. In 1888, the president of the French Third Republic Sadi Carnot promulgated a decree to establish Hai Phong city. From 1954 to 1975, Hai Phong served as the most important maritime city of North Vietnam, and it became one of direct-controlled municipalities of a reunified Vietnam with Ha Noi and Ho Chi Minh city in 1976. In the 21st century, Hai Phong has merged as a trading gateway, modern, green industrial city of Viet Nam, oriented to become the third special-class city of Viet Nam in 2030 or by 2050 at the latest.

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History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Dynastic Vietnam

Haiphong is the home of Lê Chân, one of the female generals under the command of the Trưng Sisters who rose against Chinese rule in 40 AD and ruled until their defeat in 43 AD. Centuries later under the Mạc Dynasty the area earned the appellation Hải tần Phòng thủ ("defensive coastal area") as it protected the eastern flank of Mac kings' home province.

By the 19th century at the end of Nguyễn Emperor Tự Đức's reign, the Hang Kenh Communal House in what is now the city's Le Chan district was made the administrative seat of An Dương District, restoring its regional importance. The area by then had developed into a sizable commercial port.

At the eve of the French conquest in 1881, a devastating typhoon ravaged the area, killing around 300,000 people in and around Haiphong alone. Despite the damages, Haiphong was developed by the French to serve as Indochina's main naval base over the ensuing decades.

Democratic Republic of Vietnam and the Vietnam War

Following the defeat of Japan in World War II, Vietnamese nationalists agitated for independence against the French return. French forces landed in Haiphong and encountered resistance which killed three French soldiers. In retaliation the French ships, among them the cruiser Suffren, shelled the city, setting it ablaze and precipitating the First Indochina War. French infantry forces under the command of Jean-Étienne Valluy entered the city, fighting house to house with the support of armored units and airplanes.

Late in the Vietnam War, Haiphong was subjected to heavy bombing by US Navy and Air Force strike aircraft because it was North Vietnam's only major port. U.S. Admiral Thomas H. Moorer ordered the mining of Haiphong harbor on 8 May 1972, effectively sealing the port. Until it was lifted, the mining caused no casualty. Despite being targeted, the physical structure of the city was mostly unaffected by the war as the US had a self-imposed prohibition zone for the city. After the war, the city recovered its role as a significant industrial center.[1]

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This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Haiphong. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.