Place:Flintshire, Wales

Watchers
NameFlintshire
Alt namesFlintsource: Webster's Geographical Dictionary (1984)
Sir y Fflintsource: Wikipedia
TypeHistoric county
Coordinates53.25°N 3.083°W
Located inWales     ( - 1974)
Also located inClwyd, Wales     (1974 - 1996)
See alsoFlintshire (principal area), Walesarea with revised borders that exists since 1996
Contained Places
Borough (municipal)
Flint ( 1250 - )
Chapelry
Flint ( 1250 - )
Civil parish
Buckley
Connah's Quay
Flint ( 1250 - )
Holywell
Prestatyn
Rhyl
Threapwood ( - 1896 )
County town
Mold ( - 1974 )
Hundred
Atiscross Hundred
Coleshill Commute
Coleshill Hundred
Hopedale Commute
Maelor Hundred
Maelor Saesneg Commute
Mold Hundred
Prestatyn Hundred
Rhuddlan Commute
Rhuddlan Hundred
Ystrad Alun Commute
Inhabited place
Axton
Bagillt
Bangor-on-Dee
Broughton
Brynford
Caergwrle
Caerwys
Calcoed
Carmel
Ewloe
Glan-y-don
Gorsedd
Greenfield
Gronant
Gwaenysgor
Gwespyr
Halkyn
Hawarden
Higher Kinnerton
Mostyn
Mynydd Isa
Nannerch
Northop Hall
Northop
Overton-on-Dee
Pentre Halkyn
Picton
Queensferry
Rhosesmor
Saltney
Sealand
Shotton
Soughton
Trelawnyd
Walwen
Worthenbury
Worthenbury
Ysceifiog
Locality
Threapwood ( - 1896 )
Parish (ancient)
Flint ( 1250 - )
Holywell
Prestatyn
Rhyl
Registration district
Hawarden Registration District ( 1903 - 1974 )
Holywell Registration District ( 1837 - 1974 )
Maelor Registration District ( 1954 - 1974 )
St. Asaph Registration District ( 1837 - 1974 )
Rural district
Hawarden Rural ( 1894 - 1974 )
Holywell Rural ( 1894 - 1974 )
Maelor Rural ( 1894 - 1974 )
St. Asaph Rural ( 1894 - 1974 )
Township
Higher Kinnerton
Rhyl
Unknown
Bettisfield
Bistre
Bodelwyddan
Bodfari
Bronington
Bryn-y-Pys
Caerfallwch-Rhosesmor
Cilcain
Cwm
Ddôl
Diserth
Downing
East Saltney
Ffynnongroyw
Garden City
Gwaunysgor
Gwernafield
Gwysanau
Halghton
Hanmer
Hope
Is-coed
Leeswood
Lixwm
Llanasa
Llanfynydd
Maelor Saesneg
Marford and Hosely
Meliden
Nercwys
Overton
Penley
Pentrobyn
Pontbleiddyn
Rhes-y-cae
Rhuddlan
Rhydymwyn
Saltney Ferry
St. Asaph
Talacre
Tremeirchion
Treuddyn
Tybroughton
West Saltney
Whitford
Willington
Ysgeifiog
Urban district
Buckley
Connah's Quay
Holywell
Mold Urban
Prestatyn
Rhyl
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


Image:WalesFlintshireTrad.png :the text in this section is based on an article in Wikipedia

Flintshire (Welsh: Sir y Fflint), also known as the County of Flint, is one of Wales' thirteen historic counties, and a former administrative county. It mostly lay on the northeast coast of Wales.

Flintshire is notable as having one of the few large county exclaves (an area known as "English Maelor" or "Maelor Saesneg") to survive the Counties (Detached Parts) Act 1844.

The administrative county of Flint was abolished under the Local Government Act 1972 on 1 April 1974, becoming part of the new administrative area of Clwyd. The exclaves became part of Wrexham Maelor District; other parts formed the districts of Alyn and Deeside, Delyn and Rhuddlan.

In 1996 a unitary authority, also formally named Flintshire (but described here in WeRelate as Flintshire (principal area)), was formed in 1996 under the Local Government (Wales) Act 1994, consisting only of the Alyn and Deeside and Delyn Districts. Wrexham Maelor District now form part of Wrexham County Borough, while the former Rhuddlan District now forms the northernmost part of the current Denbighshire unitary authority.

For more information, see the EN Wikipedia article Flintshire (historic)#Geography.

For more information, see the EN Wikipedia article Flintshire#History.

Research Tips

  • The National Library of Wales has just uploaded (Feb 2018) a website covering the tithe maps of Wales with accompanying apportionment documents using original and present-day maps. There are over 300,000 entries. Landowners and small villages are included. The presentation looks very good.
  • A 1900 Ordnance Survey map of the historic county of Flintshire is available on the A Vision of Britain through Time website. This shows all the old parishes within their urban and rural districts. Large farms and estates are also marked.
  • GENUKI has a page on each of the old counties of Wales and, under these counties, pages for each of the ecclesiastical parishes within the county. Information is gathered under a number of headings and the amount of information varies from parish to parish. Parish descriptions are based on a gazetteer dated 1835 and thus the emphasis is on ecclesiastical parishes. (Civil parishes were not yet established.) The submitter is very firm about his copyright. This should not stop anyone from reading the material.
  • The GENUKI Pembrokeshire pages include, under Description and Travel close to the bottom of the page, a link "parish map" to a map website showing boundaries and settlements before 1850. On the linked page will be maps of several parishes located close to each other.
  • GENUKI also provides references to other organizations who hold genealogical information for the local area, but there is no guarantee that the website has been kept up to date for every county.
  • FreeBMD provides a link to a list of the civil registration districts for each Welsh county from 1837 to 1996. Civil registration districts changed with varying densities of population and improvements in communication. Most counties and unitary authorities now have only one district. The list helps with providing names for the registration districts listed in the FreeBMD index and also as a guide for where to look for census entries.
  • The FamilySearch Wiki has a series of pages similar to those provided by GENUKI and these have been prepared at a later date. The Wiki may look like Wikipedia but the information has been provided for family historians. There are tables of links between the parishes in the historic counties of Wales and their post-1996 counterparts. This is the only genealogical website found that provides this information universally; others are not as thorough.
  • Some words in Welsh come up time and time again and you may want to know what they mean or how to pronounce them. For example,
    "Eglwys" is a church and the prefix "Llan" is a parish.
    "w" and "y" are used as vowels in Welsh.
    "Ll" is pronounced either "cl" or "hl" or somewhere in between. "dd" sounds like "th".
    The single letter "Y" is "the" and "Yn" means "in".
    "uwch" means "above"; "isod" is "below" or "under";
    "gwch" is "great", "ychydig" is "little";
    "cwm" is a "valley".
In both Welsh and English all these words are commonly used in place names in the UK. Place names are often hyphenated, or two words are combined into one. Entering your problem phrase into Google Search, including the term "meaning in Welsh", will lead you to Google's quick translation guide. I'm no authority; these are just things I have picked up while building up this gazetteer for WeRelate.
This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Flintshire (historic). The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.