Place:Amiens, Somme, France

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NameAmiens
Alt namesAmbianissource: Orbis Latinus (1971) p 17
Ambianumsource: Orbis Latinus (1971) p 17; Times Atlas of World History (1993) p 336
Samarabrivasource: Princeton Encyclopedia of Classical Sites (1979) p 800
Samarobrivasource: GRI Photo Archive, Authority File (1998) p 13214
Samasobrivasource: Times Atlas of World History (1993) p 355
TypeCommune
Coordinates49.9°N 2.3°E
Located inSomme, France
Contained Places
Former village
Longpré-lès-Amiens

Amiens is a city and commune in northern France, north of Paris and south-west of Lille.

  • Petit-Saint-Jean is a hamlet which now lies within Amiens.
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Amiens (English: or  ; ; , or ) is a city and commune in northern France, located north of Paris and south-west of Lille. It is the capital of the Somme department in the region of Hauts-de-France. In 2021, the population of Amiens was 135,429. A central landmark of the city is Amiens Cathedral, the largest Gothic cathedral in France. Amiens also has one of the largest university hospitals in France, with a capacity of 1,200 beds. The author Jules Verne lived in Amiens from 1871 until his death in 1905, and served on the city council for 15 years. Incumbent French president Emmanuel Macron was born in Amiens.

The town was fought over during both World Wars, suffering significant damage, and was repeatedly occupied by both sides. The 1918 Battle of Amiens was the opening phase of the Hundred Days Offensive which directly led to the Armistice with Germany. The Royal Air Force heavily bombed the town during the Second World War. In the aftermath, the city was rebuilt according to Pierre Dufau's plans with wider streets to ease traffic congestion. These newer structures were primarily built of brick, concrete and white stone with slate roofs. The architect Auguste Perret designed the Gare d'Amiens train station and nearby Tour Perret.

Amiens has an important historical and cultural heritage, on which a significant amount of tourism is based. Apart from the cathedral, there is the , the , the Tour Perret, the Musée de Picardie, the , and the quarters of Saint-Leu and Saint-Maurice. A total of 60 monuments are listed in the inventory of monuments historiques, over 1600 places and monuments listed in the , and 187 objects listed in the inventory of monuments historiques. During December, the town hosts the largest Christmas market in northern France. It is known for a few local foods, including "macarons d'Amiens", almond paste biscuits; "tuiles amienoises", chocolate and orange curved biscuits; "pâté de canard d'Amiens", duck pâté in pastry; "la ficelle Picarde", an oven-baked cheese-topped crêpe; and "flamiche aux poireaux", a puff pastry tart made with leeks and cream.

Contents

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

The first known settlement at this location was Samarobriva ("Somme bridge"), the central settlement of the Ambiani tribe, one of the principal tribes of Gaul. The Romans named the town Ambianum, meaning settlement of the Ambiani people. Amiens was part of Francia starting from the 5th century. The Normans sacked the city in 859 and again in 882. In 1113, the city was recognized by King Louis VI of France, and in 1185 it was linked to the Crown of France. In 1597, Spanish soldiers held the city during the six-month Siege of Amiens, before Henry IV regained control. During the 18th and 19th century, the textile tradition of Amiens became famous for its velours. As a result of the French Revolution, the provinces of France were dismantled and the territory was organised into departments. Much of Picardy became the newly created department of Somme with Amiens as the departmental capital. During the industrial revolution, the city walls were demolished, opening up space for large boulevards around the town center. The Henriville neighborhood in the south of the city was developed around this time. In 1848, the first railway arrived in Amiens, linking the city to Boulogne-sur-Mer. During the 1870 Battle of Amiens, the city was occupied by invading Prussian forces.

The town was fought over during both the First and Second World Wars, suffering significant damage and being occupied several times by both sides. The 1918 Battle of Amiens was the opening phase of the Hundred Days Offensive which led directly to the Armistice with Germany that ended the war. It was heavily bombed by the Royal Air Force during the Second World War. The city was rebuilt according to Pierre Dufau's plans with a focus on widening the streets to ease traffic congestion. These newer structures were primarily built of brick, concrete and white stone with slate roofs. The architect Auguste Perret designed the Gare d'Amiens train station and nearby Tour Perret.

Personnes mentionnées dans les actes à cause de leur fonction locale

(Cette liste doit être établie uniquement à partir de sources que chacun peut facilement vérifier, comme les Archives Départementales en ligne, ou le dépôt dans la base WeRelate d'actes numérisés - par photo ou copie scannée.)

Maires

Adjoints au maire

  • 1797 : Antoine Nicolas Morand Boucher, administrateur municipal du 5ème arrondissement
  • 1797, 1798 : Charles François Bastard Delaroche Lainé, administrateur municipal du 1er arrondissement
  • 1861 : Jean Baptiste Joseph Feuilloy
  • 1878, 1885 : Florimond Honoré Cozette, chevalier de la Légion d'Honneur

Curés

(paroisse St-Acheul)

  • 1710, 1712, 1713 : F. Lebrun, prieur curé
  • 1714 : Laignier, curé
  • 1721, 1722 : Paplart, prieur et curé
  • 1732 : Le Royer de Monclot, chanoine régulier, prêtre et curé

(paroisse St-Jacques)

  • 1739 : Delespaux, curé

(paroisse St-Michel)

(paroisse St-Pierre)

  • 1788 : Delhaye, prieur curé

(paroisse St-Rémi)

  • 1739 : Delaire, curé

(paroisse Ste-Marie-Madeleine), Renancourt

  • 1706 : Pointar, vicaire
  • 1777 : Decq, curé

Instituteurs, maîtres ou recteurs d'école

Médecins, chirurgiens, officiers de santé

Sages-femmes

Notaires

  • abt 1700 : Dangest
  • 1722 : Dehen, notaire royal
  • 1796 : Étienne Hyacinthe Tondu
  • 1825 : Allart
  • 1834 : Soyez
  • 1856 : Digeon
  • 1856 : Jean Baptiste Alexandre Navarre
  • 1894 : Louis Ernest Corby
  • 1897 : Couturier

Patronymes courants

Défunts inhumés dans l'église et non au cimetière

External links

Research Tips

28 fév 2021 ► 576 personnes y sont étudiées ou répertoriées.


This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Amiens. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.