Person:William Hillary (2)

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Sir William Hillary, 1st Baronet
b.4 January 1771
d.5 January 1847
  1. Sir William Hillary, 1st Baronet1771 - 1847
  2. Mary Hillaryabt 1781 - 1835
  • HSir William Hillary, 1st Baronet1771 - 1847
  • W.  Frances Ffytche (add)
m. 21 Feb 1800
  1. Sir Augustus William Hillary, 2nd Baronet Hillary - 1854
Facts and Events
Name Sir William Hillary, 1st Baronet
Gender Male
Birth[1] 4 January 1771
Marriage 21 Feb 1800 to Frances Ffytche (add)
Death[1] 5 January 1847
Reference Number? Q8012342?
Burial[2] Douglas, Isle of ManSt George's Church


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Sir William Hillary, 1st Baronet (4 January 1771 – 5 January 1847) was an English soldier, author and philanthropist, best known as the founder of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution in 1824. He was a Yorkshire Quaker by descent, the son of Richard Hillary and his wife, Hannah Wynne.

Hillary spent two years as an Equerry to Prince Augustus Frederick, the young son of George III. His duties included sailing with the prince in the Mediterranean, where William Hillary learned his basic seamanship and navigation skills.

Hillary married Essex-born heiress Frances Elizabeth Disney Ffytche (or Fytche) on 21 February 1800. In the same year, their twins were born, a son, Augustus William Hillary (d. 30 December 1855) and a daughter, Elizabeth Mary.[1]

Hillary's religious background did not meet with the approval of his wife's father, but Hillary still spent his wife’s inheritance (some £20,000) on creating England’s largest private army, put at the service of King George III against Napoleon’s threatened invasion. It was for this that he reputedly received his Baronetcy in 1805.

By some accounts, Hillary settled in the Isle of Man in 1808 in order to put a few miles and a little water between himself and his creditors, and to bury quietly the murkier details surrounding his elopement and marriage. In 1813, he re-married (after presumably divorcing his first wife, as she did not die until 1828) this time to a local Manx woman, Emma Tobin.[1]

Living at Fort Anne, Douglas, Isle of Man, Hillary soon became aware of the treacherous nature of the Irish Sea, with many ships being wrecked around the Manx coast. He drew up plans for a lifeboat service manned by trained crews, intended not only for the Isle of Man, but for all of the British coast. In February 1823 he published a pamphlet entitled An Appeal To The British Navy On The Humanity And Policy Of Forming A National Institution For The Preservation Of Lives And Property From Shipwreck.

Initially he received little response from the Admiralty but on appealing to the more philanthropic members of London society, including Thomas Wilson (MP for Southwark) and George Hibbert, chairman of the West Indies Merchants, the plans were enthusiastically adopted and the National Institution for the Preservation of Life from Shipwreck was founded on 4 March 1824 at a meeting in The Tavern, Bishopsgate Street, London.

The title changed 30 years later to the Royal National Lifeboat Institution and the first of the new lifeboats to be built was stationed at Douglas in recognition of Hillary's work.

This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Sir_William_Hillary,_1st_Baronet. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.
This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at William Hillary. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.
References
  1. 1.0 1.1 Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia.
  2. From inscription mounted below Sir William Hillary statue on Douglas Head.