Person:William Blunt (12)

Watchers
William Blunt
 
  1. James Ringgold Blunt1765 - Bef 1810
  2. William Blunt - 1833
Facts and Events
Name William Blunt
Gender Male
Death? Jun 1833 Concordia, Louisiana, United States
References
  1.   Maryland Court of Appeals. Maryland Reports: Cases Adjudged in the Court of Appeals of Maryland. (Baltimore, Maryland: Cushings & Bailey, 1869)
    Vol. 2, Pages 298-310, June & Dec. Terms 1852.

    Newcomer vs Orem
    [Extract from Record]

    William Blunt of the State of Louisiana died in June 1833, leaving a large real and personal estate, also a last will and testament, dated the 28th of Jannuary 1833, by which he directed that after all his debts were paid his executors should “keep all my property real and personal together, for the space of three years after my decease, and at or after that period to sell and dispose of it in the best possible manner, if they deem it advisable for the benefit of the estate.” And after several bequests of specific legacies the will proceeds. “I give to my sister Ann H. White, the heirs of James Ringgold Blunt, and the heirs of my late sister Sarah Bryan, the remainder of my estate wheresoever and whatsoever in America and England,” and appointed Frederick Bryan and William B. Lintot his executors. This will was admitted to probate in August 1833.
    James Ringgold Blunt was a deceased borther of the testator, having died in the State of Maryland, leaving seven children who were his heirs at law at the time of the death of the said William Blunt, including Maria Blunt who intermarried with Orem the plaintiff, in June 1836, in Talbot county, Maryland, where they now reside and always have resided. The executors of William Blunt assumed the administration of his estate in Louisiana, and in 1834 one John Harper was duly and legally appointed by the heirs of the said James R. Blunt, and by the said Mrs. Ann White, their agent and attorney, to take all necessary and legal steps in the State of Louisiana, to collect and receive for them from the executors of said William Blunt, their respective proportions of his estate under his will, and to take all necessary steps for their better security in the premises. In the fall of 1834, said Harper proceeded to Louisiana, and on his application to the court of probate in the parish of Concordia, the power of the executors under the will of William Blunt was revoked, and one Tenney was appointed curator of the estate, and on the 6th of January 1837, inventories and appraisements of said estate were returned to said court. The inventory and appraisement of the estate, real and personal, in the parish of Concordia, called the “Wakefield Plantation,” amounted to $98,332.25, and that in the parish of Catahoula called the “Home Estate,” to $73,652.25.
    On the 13th of February 1837, the estate in the parish of Concordia, consisting of land, negroes, stock and farming utensils, was sold at public sale by the parish judge, under a decree of the probate court of said parish, to one James McIntosh Williams, for the sum of $218,000, who paid $10,000 in cash, and the residue in drafts and negotiable notes, payable to the heirs of the succession of said Wm. Blunt, secured by mortgage of the property to the heirs of the succession of William Blunt, and on the same day the same judge, by virtue of the same authority, also sold at public sale the Catahoula estate, also consisting of land, negroes, stock and farming utensils, to one Josias Armstrong Lyle, for $175,000, of which the purchaser paid $10,000 in cash, and the residue in drafts and negotiable notes, payable as above, and also secured by a mortgage on the property to the heirs of the succession of William Blunt. The said Harper and David C. Newcomer, agents in fact of the testamentary heirs of the said William Blunt, were present, and for their principals assented to said sales, and became parties vendors thereto, and the said promissory notes to the amount of the interest of the said heirs of the said James Ringgold Blunt were then delivered to and received by the said Harper as their agent and attorney. The said real estate, consisting of land, sold for $182,086, the other estate, (real by the laws of Louisiana,) consisting of negroes, for $175,658, and the residue of said estate, being personal, for $35,255.
    John A. Lyle, the purchaser of the Catahoula estate, died in 1840, insolvent and unable to pay the purchase money. His mortgage was foreclosed, and the said estate was sold on the 16th of February 1841, and purchased by David C. Newcomer, the defendant, in the name and for the heirs, devisees and legatees of the said William Blunt, by virtue of authority to him duly given by the said heirs, devisees and legatees, and their respective husbands, including Orem, the plaintiff. William [ie. James McIntosh Williams], the purchaser of the Concordia estate, made partial payments on his purchase, besides the cash payment of $10,000 but a large amount remaining unpaid, the mortgage was foreclosed, in January 1846, and the said estate was then sold and purchased by the said Newcomer for the heirs of the said William Blunt, under the same authority under which the Catahoula estate was purchased.
    The Concordia estate was afterwards, and subsequent to the death of the plaintiff’s wife, sold by the said Newcomer, to one John A. Sanderson, for the sum of $30,000, and with $15,000 of the said proceeds of sale, the said Newcomer purchased another tract of land in the parish of Catahoula, in the name and for the heirs of the said William Blunt, by virtue of a power of attorney to him granted for such purpose, by the said heirs, devisees and legatees, and their respective husbands, including the plaintiff.
    Maria, the wife of the plaintiff, Orem, died in 1844, never having had issue of her body, leaving her said husband and her six brothers and sisters surviving her, except one Mrs. Adams who had previously died, leaving lawful issue. The proceeds of said estate of William Blunt received for rent, and to which the wife of the plaintiff was entitled in her lifetime, were duly paid over to him and her…

  2.   Davis, Ronald L.F. Black Experience in Natchez: 1720-1880: Special History Study. (Mississippi: National Historical Park, 1993).

    Some slaveholders put language in their wills aimed at safeguarding the slave families.
    William Blunt of Concordia Parish, in one of the most unusual wills filed, instructed his
    executors to "sell and dispose of [his} property in the best possible manner. . . for the
    benefit of the. . .heirs and legaters, allowing my negroes the privilege of selecting and
    choosing [their] masters."