Person:Stephen Vladislav I of Serbia (1)

Watchers
Stephen Vladislav I of Serbia
 
d.Aft 1264
  1. Saint Sava II _____ - 1371
  2. Stephen Radoslav of SerbiaEst 1192 - Est 1235
  3. Stephen Vladislav I of Serbia - Aft 1264
  4. Komnena Nemanjić1195 -
Facts and Events
Name Stephen Vladislav I of Serbia
Gender Male
Marriage to Beloslava of Bulgaria
Unknown? Q346960?
Death[1] Aft 1264


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Stefan Vladislav (;  – after 1264) was the King of Serbia from 1234 to 1243. He was the middle son of Stefan the First-Crowned of the Nemanjić dynasty, who ruled Serbia from 1196 to 1228. Radoslav, the eldest son of Stefan the First-Crowned, was ousted by the Serbian nobility due to increasing Epirote influence through his marriage alliance to Theodore Komnenos Doukas; Vladislav was appointed as his successor.

During Vladislav's reign, his uncle Archbishop Sava went on a pilgrimage and died in Bulgaria while on his way home. Vladislav obtained the remains and buried them in the Mileševa monastery, which he had built intended to be his burial place. Serbia was politically aligned with Bulgaria at the time, since Vladislav was married to Beloslava, the daughter of Ivan Asen II. Vladislav secured Hum, a maritime province under attack by Hungarian crusaders.

After the death of Ivan Asen II, there was unrest in Serbia. The Mongols, led by Kadan, invaded Hungary and devastated the Balkans, at which time the Serbian nobility rose up against Vladislav. In 1243, he abdicated in favour of his younger brother, but remained the ruler of Zeta.

He was described as very energetic, reliable, and hot-tempered. The Serbian Orthodox Church venerates him as a saint on .

This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Stephen Vladislav I of Serbia. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.
References
  1. Stephen Vladislav I of Serbia, in Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia.