Person:Ralph Olmsted (1)

Watchers
m. 2 May 1782
  1. Vine Olmsted1783 - 1788
  2. Hezekiah Olmsted1784 - 1847
  3. Lucy Olmstead1785 - 1840
  4. Emma White Olmsted1788 - 1851
  5. Ralph Olmsted1790 - 1835
  6. Francis Olmstead1791 - 1846
  7. Caroline Olmsted1793 - 1858
  8. Timothy Olmsted1795 - 1796
  9. Timothy Olmsted1796 - 1850
  10. Mary Olmsted1798 -
  11. Sarah Olmsted1799 - 1799
  12. Catherine Olmstead1801 - 1887
  13. Cornelia Olmsted1804 - 1806
m. 12 May 1817
  1. Mary Phelps Olmsted
Facts and Events
Name Ralph Olmsted
Gender Male
Birth[1] 2 Feb 1790 East Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut, United States
Marriage 12 May 1817 New York, United Statesto Mary Charlotte Jackson
Death[1] 6 Aug 1835 Augusta, Richmond, Georgia, United States

Possible records for review

  • Note: This was published after the supposed 1835 death of Ralph Olmstead, but there are no other Ralph Olmsteads entered yet (Mar 2017), making this article a possible match. More research is needed to confirm.
Seduction and Bigamy. - Our hitherto quiet and peaceful village has been lately thrown into commotion by the pranks of a fellow of gentlemanly exterior named Ralph Olmstead. He came here about a year since [1838], and engaged himself as a journeyman shoemaker, representing himself as being in mourning for his lately deceased wife, and stating that he had a child living in Pennsylvania. His deportment caused no suspicion nor excited curiosity until last June [1839], when it became manifest that he had destroyed the peace of one of our most industrious families, by seducing the eldest daughter under pretence of marriage. He soon found the law in requisition against him, and the affair was subsequently settled. But to cap the climax of his rascality, he engaged the affections of a respectable young lady, also residing in the village and a few days since married her. On the evening of his marriage, a letter was received from Greenwich, Conn., stating that he had a wife living in that place. The morning after the reception of the news, he told his bride that he felt unwell and wished to take a short walk. He accordingly walked off, and for ought we know, he is walking yet, as he has not since returned. Olmstead is adept in villany. It is said that he has seduced no less than three females - one in Bethany, Pa., one in Greenwich, Conn., and one in this village. He is 23 or 24 years of age. About six months since, he purchased "the boot and shoe establishment" of his employer, and until he was prosecuted for seduction did a very good business. He then sold out, and has since worked as a journeyman. - Monticello (N.Y.) Watchman. [as published in the American and Commercial Daily Advertiser (Baltimore, Maryland), 26 Aug 1839, p 2.]
References
  1. 1.0 1.1 641, in Olmsted, Henry King (1824-1896), and George Kemp Ward (1848-1937). Genealogy of the Olmsted family in America: embracing the descendants of James and Richard Olmstead and covering a period of nearly three centuries, 1632-1912. (New York: A. T. DeLaMare, 1912.).

    p 40 -
    ...641, Ralph +. ...

    p 70 -
    (641) RALPH OLMSTED, New York City. b. at E. Hartford, Conn., Feb. 2, 1790; d. at Augusta, Ga., Dec. 6, 1835; m. May 13, 1817, Mary Charlotte Jackson; b. Nov. 25, 1798, in Canandaigua, N. Y.; d. Aug. 1, 1885; dau. of Asa and Mary (Phelps) Jackson, of New York City. Mary Phelps was dau. of Oliver and Mary (Seymour) Phelps and granddaughter of Zechariah and Sarah (Steele) Seymour, and great-granddaughter of Zechariah and Hannah (Olmsted) Seymour, of Hartford, Conn.

    1412, Mary Phelps +.

  2.   Lanier, Henry Wysham. A century of banking in New York, 1822-1922. (New York: The Gilliss Press, 1922)
    125.

    OLMSTED, Ralph.
    Owned 86 Liberty Street in 1822. His estate was valued at $7,000, and his personal property at $3,000. A rich dry goods merchant.
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    [also] LORD, Rufus. ... One of the partners of Lord & Olmstead, with Ralph Olmstead, dry goods merchants of 172 Pearl. The firm started in 1817 and was dissolved in 1822. ...
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    [cos1776 note: according to an 1819 invoice, the spelling was "Lord & Olmsted"]