Person:Joan of France, Duchess of Berry (1)

Watchers
Jeanne de France, duchesse de Berry
m. 9 Mar 1451
  1. Louis de France1458 - 1460
  2. Joachim de France1459 - 1459
  3. Louise de France1460 - 1460
  4. Anne of France1461 - 1522
  5. Jeanne de France, duchesse de Berry1464 - 1505
  6. François de France1466 - 1466
  7. Charles VIII _____, of France1470 - 1498
  8. François de France1472 - 1473
m. 8 Sep 1476
Facts and Events
Name Jeanne de France, duchesse de Berry
Alt Name[2] Sainte-Jeanne de France
Gender Female
Birth[1][2] 23 Apr 1464 Nogent-le-Roi, Eure-et-Loir, France
Marriage 8 Sep 1476 Montrichard, Loir-et-Cher, FranceChâteau de Montrichard
to Louis XII _____, de France
Annulment 17 Dec 1498 Amboise, Indre-et-Loire, Francefrom Louis XII _____, de France
Death[1][2] 4 Feb 1505 Bourges, Cher, FranceBishop's palace
Burial[2] Bourges, Cher, FranceMonastère de l'Annonciade
Reference Number? Q236220?


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Joan of France (; 23 April 1464 – 4 February 1505), was briefly Queen of France as wife of King Louis XII, in between the death of her brother, King Charles VIII, and the annulment of her marriage. After that, she retired to her domain, where she soon founded the monastic Order of the Sisters of the Annunciation of Mary, where she served as abbess. From this Order later sprang the religious congregation of the Apostolic Sisters of the Annunciation, founded in 1787 to teach the children of the poor. She was canonized on 28 May 1950 and is known in the Roman Catholic Church as Saint Joan of Valois, O.Ann.M..

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References
  1. 1.0 1.1 Joan of France, Duchess of Berry, in Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 JEANNE de France, in Cawley, Charles. Medieval Lands: A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families.