Person:James Hansbrough (7)

Watchers
James Hansbrough
b.21 JAN 1768
d.14 MAY 1853
m. 10 SEP 1766
  1. Mildred Brown Hansbrough - 1835
  2. James Hansbrough1768 - 1853
  3. Peter Hansbrough1769 - 1843
  4. John Hansbrough1771 - 1814
  5. Betsey Hansbrough1774 -
  6. Amelia Hansbrough1776 - 1833
  7. Joseph Sumner Hansbrough1779 - Bef 1820
  8. William Hansbrough1781 - 1837
m. 20 MAR 1788
  1. Joseph Sumner Hansbrough1790 - 1864
  2. Lucy Doniphan Hansbrough1793 - Bet 1859 & 1866
  3. Eleanor Sumner Hansbrough1796 -
  4. Peter Hansbrough1799 - 1843
  5. James Hansbrough1801 - 1853
  6. Thomas DeEll Hansbrough1804 - 1880
  7. John Calhoun Hansbrough1806 - Aft 1875
Facts and Events
Name James Hansbrough
Gender Male
Birth[1] 21 JAN 1768
Marriage 20 MAR 1788 to Fannie Monteith Finnell
Death? 14 MAY 1853
Reference Number? JWH #242

242. JAMES HANSBROUGH: (23 Peter) Born man 21, 1768; died May 14, 1853. According to Fredericksburg records, he appears to have been living in that town in 1785-1786, for on December 5, 1785, and on May 15, 1786, he witnessed two deeds. The only time his name appears as a resident of King George is in 1791, when he was taxed for one white tythable, 3 negro tythables, and 3 horses. When James left King George for the up-country, he did not dispose of his real estate holdings there, for on August 14, 1830, he advertised for sale his "Fishing Shore, called Green Landing, in King George at, or near, the mouth of Potomac Creek, and 80 acres of land," "also a tract adjoining the above, 200 acres being a part of the well known tract, ‘Belvedaire.'" From King George, he probably moved to Madison sometime about 1793, as from May 10, 1794, until May 13, 1802, he paid taxes on 1 male, 16 years of age and older (himself), and 6 blacks over 16 years of age. From May 23, 1797, to May 13, 1802, he owned 3-5 blacks between 12-16. On May 23, 1793, he was the owner of 4 horses, and between 1794- 1802, he owned 6-9 horses, and on May 10, 1794, he is reported as the owner of 2 "chairs." From Madison, James moved to Culpeper early in 1803, having commenced the purchase of land in that county. Shortly after moving to Culpeper, he became interested in the Stevensburg Academy, for we find him as one of the managers of the public lottery, authorized by the General Assembly of Virginia, December j3, 1804, to raise $1,200 for the benefit of the academy. In 1813, James advertised that he would receive "10 to 15 boarders in his house at moderate terms," stating that his "house is about 600 yards from the academy, on an elevated position, and remarkable for health and way to the academy," and that it was "quite dry at all seasons." He was popularly known as "Mr. Jimmy," and in his latter days, had the reputation of being "hard- boiled." It is said that disobedient children and troublesome slaves were threatened that if they did not mend their ways they would be turned over to "Mr. Jimmy." This often had the desired effect, for he was greatly feared. On March 20, 1788, he married Fannie Monteith Finnell, she died March 13, 1815, daughter of Johathan Finnell and his wife, Margaret, daughter of Thomas Monteith who died in 1784. They had seven children.

Children (HANSBROUGH) 295. JOSEPH SUMNER - born September 28, 1790. 296. LUCY DONIPHAN - born June 11, 1793. 297. ELEANOR SUMNER - born January 13, 1796. 298. PETER - born April 27, 1799. 299. JAMES - born August 27, 1801. 300. THOMAS De ELL - born February 13, 1804. 301. JOHN CALHOUN - born February 14, 1806.

References
  1. John W. Hansborough. History and Genealogy of the Hansborough - Hansbrough Family. (Name: Name: 1981, John W. Hansborough;;)
    106-107.

    242. JAMES HANSBROUGH: (23 Peter) Born man 21, 1768; died May 14, 1853. According to Fredericksburg records, he appears to have been living in that town in 1785-1786, for on December 5, 1785, and on M ay 15, 1786, he witnessed two deeds. The only time his name appears as a resident of King George is in 1791, when he was taxed for one white tythable, 3 negro tythables, and 3 horses. When James left King George for the up-country, he d id not dispose of his real estate holdings there, for on August 14, 1830, he advertised for sale his "Fishing Shore, called Green Landing, in King George at, or near, the mouth of Potomac Creek, and 8 0 acres of land," "also a tract adjoining the above, 200 acres being a part of the well known tract, ‘Belvedaire.'" From King George, he probably moved to Madison sometime about 1793, as from May 10, 1794, until May 13, 1802, he paid taxes on 1 male, 16 years of age and older (himself), and 6 blacks over 16 year s of age. From May 23, 1797, to May 13, 1802,he owned 3-5 blacks between 12-16. On May 23, 1793, he was the owner of 4 horses, and between 1794- 1802, he owned 6-9 horses, and on May 10, 1794, he i s reported as the owner of 2 "chairs." From Madison, James moved to Culpeper early in 1803, having commenced the purchase of land in that county. Shortly after moving to Culpeper, he became interested in the Stevensburg Academy, for we fi nd him as one of the managers of the public lottery, authorized by the General Assembly of Virginia, December j3, 1804, to raise $1,200 for the benefit of the academy. In 1813, James advertised that h e would receive "10 to 15 boarders in his house at moderate terms," stating that his "house is about 600 yards from the academy, on an elevated position, and remarkable for health and way to the acade my," and that it was "quite dry at all seasons." He was popularly known as "Mr. Jimmy," and in his latter days, ad the reputation of being "hard- boiled." It is said that disobedient children and troublesome