Person:Jack Dodds (1)

Watchers
  1. Auvilla Dodds - Bef 1897
  2. David L. Dodds - Bef 1897
  3. Mary Dodds - Bef 1897
  4. Kate R. Dodds - Bef 1897
m.
Facts and Events
Name John M. Dodds
Gender Male
Residence? Bet 1840 and 1860 Washington, Montgomery, Ohio, United States
Marriage second marriage for the husband
to Elizabeth Himes
Military[1] War of 1812
Occupation[1] Moraine, Montgomery, Ohio, United Statesmiller
Death? 1860 Washington, Montgomery, Ohio, United States
References
  1. 1.0 1.1 .

    Centennial portrait and biographical record of the city of Dayton and of Montgomery County, Ohio: containing biographical sketches of prominent and representative citizens, together with biographies and portraits of the presidents of the United States and biographies of the governors of Ohio. (A.W. Bowen, 1897).
    CHARLES W. DODDS [pages 958-959] was born in Miamisburg, Montgomery county, Ohio, December 15, 1857, a son of William and Mary (Dodro) Dodds. His great-grandfather, Gen. William Dodds, a Revolutionary soldier, settled near Alexanderville, Montgomery county, in 1806, where he engaged in farming, and at one time owned the land where West Carrollton now stands, His wife was a Miss McGrew, and both died in Miami township, and are buried in the old Presbyterian cemetery in Washington township. Their children were Joseph, Argaret (Mrs. David Lamme), William, John M., Polly (Mrs. Moses Smith), Sarah A. (Mrs. James McLain), James, Thomas and Martha (Mrs. John Smith). Of these, John M., the grandfather of Charles W., having inherited land from his father's estate, was for nearly twenty years engaged in the milling business, operating a mill on the Miami, near the Pinnacles, and another on Hole's creek. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, and captain of a company of light infantry in the days of militia. In 1840 he removed to Washington township, where he died in 1860. He was twice married: first, to Mary Parsons, who bore him four children, all now deceased, viz: Auvilla, David L., Mary and Kate R. His second wife was Elizabeth, daughter of John Himes, a pioneer of Van Buren township, who bore him seven children: William, John H., Angeline (Mrs. Jerry Ewing), Thomas, James, Preston C. and Moses S. All the sons, except William and James, were soldiers in the late war.
    William Dodds, the eldest son of John M. and Mary Dodds, and father of Charles W., was born in Miami township, February 7, 1823. As a boy he worked in his father's mill; later boated on the canal, and for twenty-five years was a resident of Miamisburg, where he was engaged as a contractor on house painting, and in other business. His wife, Mary was a daughter of Conrad and Mary (Lemon) Dodro, formerly of Lancaster county, Pa., and pioneers of Dayton. Conrad Dodro was a fuller and carder by trade, also taught school, was for many years a resident of Dayton, and died while on a visit to his old home in Pennsylvania, William Dodds was the father of nine children, viz: Otto F., Perry, Lizzie (Mrs. Dr. B. F. Mullen), Charles W., Ella (Mrs. Lee Silberman), Emma (Mrs. S. F. Evans), Clay, Clarence and Lehm. Mr. Dodds died in Miamisburg in 1873 and his wife, Mary, died in 1881.
    Charles W, Dodds was reared to manhood in Miamisburg, where he received his education in the public schools and served an apprenticeship of two years at cigarmaking, after which he worked as a journeyman for several years in various cities and towns in the country. In 1878 he started a factory of his own in Miamisburg on a small scale, also retailing cigars and confectionery, and, as his means permitted, gradually enlarged his facilities, adding a stock of books, papers, notions, etc., until the business had grown to considerable dimensions. He continued in this occupation for fourteen years, and then turned it over to his brother Lehm, whom he had reared, and in 1892, as a member of the firm of Dodds & Mays, embarked in business as buyer and packer of leaf tobacco, in which he has since successfully continued,
    Mr. Dodds was married in 1881 to Jennie, daughter of Samuel B. and Fannie (Northrup) Andrews, of West Carrollton, and has three children: Willard, Robert and Fannie. He is one of the leading business men of Miamisburg, is a member of the German Reformed church, and of the I. 0. 0. F. encampment, U. R., Patriarchs Militant, Daughters of Rebekah, and is a thirty-second degree Mason. He has been treasurer of Marion lodge, No. 18, I. 0. 0. F., Miamisburg, for ten years, and is also treasurer of the incorporation of the same body. He is a member of the Miamisburg school board and of the board of cemetery directors. In politics he is a stanch republican.
    In the organization of the board of trade of Miamisburg Mr. Dodds was elected one of the members of the executive board, and was always one of its leading and active members. Through his efforts, push and energy the Enterprise Carriage Manufacturing company, one of the most thriving and valuable industries of the town, was located in Miamisburg.

    LEHM DODDS, [page 959] dealer in cigars, newspapers and confectionery, was born in Miamisburg, Ohio, December 27, 1870, a son of William and Mary (Dodro) Dodds, whose history will be found in the preceding sketch of C. W. Dodds. He was reared in Miamisburg and educated in the public schools, started in life as a clerk in the store of his brother, Charles W., and served in that capacity until 1862, when he became a member of the firm of Dodds & Andrews, by purchasing the cigar, newspaper and confectionery business of C. W. Dodds, his brother. He continued the partnership up to January 1, 1896, when he purchased his partner's interest, and has since successfully continued the business alone.
    He married, September 25, 1895, Mary Edith, daughter of Jacob H. and Martha E. (Snoderly) Johnson, of, Miamisburg. Mr. and Mrs. Dodds are members of the Reformed church and have been members of the choir for several years. Mr. Dodds is also a member of the 0. U. A. M., Wayne council, No. 90; I. 0. 0. F., Marion lodge, No. 18, and encampment, and Daughters of Rebekah. In politics he is a republican, but has never sought or held office. He is one of the most popular merchants in Miamisburg, and socially he and his wife enjoy the regard of a large circle of acquaintances.


    www.daytonhistorybooks.com

  2.   .

    The Pinnacles, formerly located just west of here, consisted of a gorge with unique large boulders created during the ice age on its slopes. The strange geologic rock formations (also known as the Devil’s Backbone) overlooked the Great Miami River. The updraft created by the terrain attracted soaring birds. From 1897 to 1899 the Wright Brothers biked here and observed buzzards (turkey vultures) soaring gracefully above the river valley. In the summer of 1899 the Wrights developed their wing warping theory while watching the birds at Pinnacle Hill twist the tips of their wings as they soared into the wind.

    http://ci.moraine.oh.us/the-pinnacles/