Person:Isaiah Crane (2)

Watchers
Pvt. Isaiah Kidder Crane
m. ABT 1819
  1. Pvt. Isaiah Kidder Crane1820 - 1894
  2. Amariah Crane1822 - 1888
  3. James Austin Crane1825 - 1888
  4. Sarah Ann Crane1827 - 1834
  5. Eliza Ann Crane1829 - 1830
  6. Franklin Crane1832 - 1835
  7. Sarah Jane Crane1834 - 1915
  8. Franklin L. Crane1837 -
m. 13 FEB 1865
  1. Robert Edward Crane1866 - 1946
  2. Stephen Bird Crane1867 - 1944
Facts and Events
Name Pvt. Isaiah Kidder Crane
Gender Male
Birth? 28 FEB 1820 Washington, Sullivan Co., NH
Residence[3] 1855 Maquoketa, Jackson Co, IA
Other[7] 14 SEP 1861 Dubuque, IAEnlisted in 12th IA Infantry Military
Other? 5 DEC 1864 mustered out Military
Marriage 13 FEB 1865 Jackson Co., IAto Margaret Angeline Smith
Death[1] 21 AUG 1894 Maquoketa, Jackson Co, IA
Burial[1] 22 AUG 1894 Waterford/Buckhorn Cemetary, Jackson Co., IA
Other? Fought for 3 years during the Civil War in Company I, 12th Iowa Infantry Military
Other[5] Misc
Other[2][6] Misc
Occupation? Maquoketa, Jackson Co, IAProsperous Farmer

Our subject is one of the many who gave much of the best of their lives to their country, and it is with pleasure we give a sketch of so varied a life-story. Isaiah Crane resides in Nashville, and has lived in the county since the fall of 1855. The son of Solomon and Elizabeth (Mills) Crane, natives of New Hampshire, Isaiah Crane was born in Sullivan County, N.H., on the 28th day of February, 1820.

It is supposed that Henry Crane and Tabitha, his wife, came from England and settled in Milton, Mass., in the year of 1648, or '49. It is certain, however, that they were residents of Milton, in 1650. They were the parents of ten children. Stephen their second son, married Mary Denison, July 2, 1676, and was the father of nine children. The sixth child, Benjamin, was born Dec. 17, 1692, and married Abigail Houghton, Dec. 27, 1722, by whom eight children were born. Joseph, their eldest, was born Feb. 28, 1724, and married Mary Copeland. Their son, Joseph, Jr., was born in 1757, and married Deliverance Mills. They lived in Milton, Mass., after their marriage until their first child was born, after which, in 1782, they removed to Washington, N.H., and settled on the south-east slope of Mt. Lowell. After a few years the family removed into a house which stood on the mountain road to Washington Centre. Here they lived until the infirmities of age compelled them to give up their home and live with their children.

Joseph Crane died in Washington, N. H., June 30, 1841. His wife died Aug. 17, 1845. Some years prior to her death she sustained a fracture of the thigh, which made her a cripple during the remainder of her life. Of their children, Solomon was born March 26, 1793. He married Elizabeth Mills, of Clairmont, who died May 22, 1846. He was subsequently married to Mrs. Lucy Proctor. The oldest son of his first marriage, Isaiah, is the subject of this sketch. His earlier years were spent in the duties of farm life. In 1843 he married Olive Heald, whose death occurred in 1855. She left two children - John H. and James C. Our subject then came to Iowa, and engaged in farming. A few years later he purchased 160 acres of land.

In 1861, our subject enlisted and entered service in Company I, 12th Iowa Infantry. His first experience of war was at Ft. Henry; then followed Ft. Donelson, Shiloh, the siege of Vicksburg, then the Red River expedition under Gen. Banks. He was afflicted with rheumatism at Ft. Donelson and was in the hospital for some time. He has never recovered. Our subject served three years and three months as a musician during the service.

Retiring from service, Mr. Crane resumed farming in Jackson County, and in Feb. 13, 1865, was married to M. Angeline Smith, daughter of Robert L. and Molly Smith. She was born in Butler County, Pa., June 5, 1836. Her parents were from Pennsylvania. Her great-grandparents, paternal and maternal, emigrated from the Highlands of Scotland and traced their ancestry to Bruce, of Scotland. She was the first one to advocate women's rights in Maquoketa. Her maternal great-grandfather, Sir Thomas Graham, came from Scotland and settled in Butler County, Pa., which county he helped survey. He afterward received 400 acres of land for helping to survey the western part of the State. The grandfather, William Graham, lived all his life in Butler County, Pa. Her paternal great-grandfather, Joseph Smith lived and died in Butler County, Pa. Her father, Robert L., removed from Pennsylvania to Iowa, in 1848, and settled in Clinton County, where he engaged in farming. He was formerly a blacksmith.

Strongly opposed to slavery, Robert L. Smith was the first abolitionist of Clinton County. He assisted in getting the first slaves across the Mississippi River. Those slaves were started by John Brown and were taken from Nebraska. Mr. Smith kept them at his residence for some time. He transported many of the slaves over the underground railroad for many years. He was the means of delivering as many as 100 from slavery to freedom. His daughter, wife of our subject, assisted her father in the underground railroad in liberating slaves.

Loved and esteemed by all who knew him, Mr. Smith died, at the age of seventy-two years, in Clinton County. His wife died at the age of sixty-seven years. Their household numbered a large family of children, eight of whom grew to manhood and womanhood. The oldest is the wife of our subject. She was married in 1855 to William Hoisinton, a native of Michigan, and resided in Clinton County till the time of her marriage. They became the parents of one child. This son was given a college education and became a civil engineer in Canada, where he was drowned at the age of twenty-eight years. His name was Elliott. Mr. and Mrs. Crane resided in South Fork Township, and followed farming until October 1886. He still owns 100 acres in South Fork. They have two children - R. Eddie and S. Bird, both of whom are residents of Jackson County.

("Portrait and Biographical Album of Jackson County, Iowa", originally published in 1889, by the Chapman Brothers, of Chicago, Illinois)

4 children

References
  1. 1.0 1.1 Church of Jesus Christ and Latter Day Saints, "Iowa Marriages, 1809-1992," database, Church of Jesus Christ an
    Accessed; 6/27/2010.
  2. , (I)Portrait and Biographical Album of Jackson County, Iowa (Chicago, IL: Chapman Brothers, 1889), .
    Excerpt: Isaiah Crane.
  3. Washington History Committee, History of Washington, New Hampshire: From 1768 to 1886, a facsimile of the 1886
    359.
  4.   Family data, Solomon Crane Family Bible, New Testament ofour Lord and Savior Jesus Christ: Translated out of t.
  5. Isaiah K. Crane, the son of Solomon and Elizabeth (Mills) Crane, was
    born in Washington, Sullivan county. New Hampshire, February 28, 1820.
    His earliest years were spent on the farm. In 1843, Miss Olive Heald became
    his wife. She died in 1855, leaving two children, John H. , and James C. ,
    both residents of this city. Soon after the death of his wife Mr. Crane came
    to this state and engaged in farming until the war broke out, when he heed-
    ed his country's call and enlisted as a member of Company I, Twelfth Iowa
    Infantry. He was present at Fort Henry, Fort Douelson, Shiloh the Siege
    of Vicksburg, the Red River expedition under General Banks, etc., serving
    his country faithfully and well for three years and three months. After the
    war Mr. Crane resumed farming in this county, and on February 13, 1865,
    was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Angeline Smith of De Witt, who
    survives him and who enjoys the proud distinction of being able to trace her
    ancestry to the noble Robert Bruce, of Scotland. Her father, Robert L.
    Smith, was the first abolitionist, to his honor be it said, of Clinton county.
    I. K. Crane, the subject of this sketch, died at his home in this city on Tues-
    day morning , August 21, 1894, of dropsy of the heart. At the age of 18 be
    became a member of the Baptist church and until his death, or more than
    fifty-six years, lived a sincere, upright christian life. If he ma^le mistakes,
    and all men do, they were of the head and not of the heart, and it is the
    universal verdict of all who knew" him well that he was one of nature's
    noblemen. What higher title can any man have or desire. He was honest,
    generous and patriotic. By his second wife he leaves two sons, R. Edward
    and S. Bird, both of whom as well as the other two, John H. and James C. ,
    were present at the funeral, which was held at the Buckhorn church, under
    tlie auspices of A. W. Drips Post, of which he was an honored member, and
    was one of the largest of the many large funerals which have been held in
    that neighborhood. More than ninety teams were in the procession. Dr.
    Hi^ald pronounced the funeral discourse, a fitting -eulogy to the departed. The remains were laid to rest in the adjoining cemetery, of which deceased
    has been sexton for nearly thirty years.

    From "Reunion of Twelfth Iowa Veteran Vol. Infantry" posted online at http://www.ebooksread.com/authors-eng/1861-1866-from-old-catalog-iowa-infantry-12th-regt/reunion-of-twelfth-iowa-vet-vol-infantry--awo/page-32-reunion-of-twelfth-iowa-vet-vol-infantry--awo.shtml

    Accessed 7/1/2010
  6. ISAIAH CRANE

    MILLS, DENISON, HOUGHTON, COPELAND, PROCTOR, HEALD, SMITH, GRAHAM, HOISINTON

    Posted By: Donna Moldt Walker <mdwalker@trilobyte.net>
    Date: 2/20/2004 at 10:54:09

    ~ ISAIAH CRANE ~

    Our subject is one of the many who gave much of the best of their lives to their country, and it is with pleasure we give a sketch of so varied a life-story. Isaiah Crane resides in Nashville, and has lived in the county since the fall of 1855. The son of Solomon and Elizabeth (Mills) Crane, natives of New Hampshire, Isaiah Crane was born in Sullivan County, N.H., on the 28th day of February, 1820.

    It is supposed that Henry Crane and Tabitha, his wife, came from England and settled in Milton, Mass., in the year of 1648, or '49. It is certain, however, that they were residents of Milton, in 1650. They were the parents of ten children. Stephen their second son, married Mary Denison, July 2, 1676, and was the father of nine children. The sixth child, Benjamin, was born Dec. 17, 1692, and married Abigail Houghton, Dec. 27, 1722, by whom eight children were born. Joseph, their eldest, was born Feb. 28, 1724, and married Mary Copeland. Their son, Joseph, Jr., was born in 1757, and married Deliverance Mills. They lived in Milton, Mass., after their marriage until their first child was born, after which, in 1782, they removed to Washington, N.H., and settled on the south-east slope of Mt. Lowell. After a few years the family removed into a house which stood on the mountain road to Washington Centre. Here they lived until the infirmities of age compelled them to give up their home and live with their children.

    Joseph Crane died in Washington, N. H., June 30, 1841. His wife died Aug. 17, 1845. Some years prior to her death she sustained a fracture of the thigh, which made her a cripple during the remainder of her life. Of their children, Solomon was born March 26, 1793. He married Elizabeth Mills, of Clairmont, who died May 22, 1846. He was subsequently married to Mrs. Lucy Proctor. The oldest son of his first marriage, Isaiah, is the subject of this sketch. His earlier years were spent in the duties of farm life. In 1843 he married Olive Heald, whose death occurred in 1855. She left two children - John H. and James C. Our subject then came to Iowa, and engaged in farming. A few years later he purchased 160 acres of land.

    In 1861, our subject enlisted and entered service in Company I, 12th Iowa Infantry. His first experience of war was at Ft. Henry; then followed Ft. Donelson, Shiloh, the siege of Vicksburg, then the Red River expedition under Gen. Banks. He was afflicted with rheumatism at Ft. Donelson and was in the hospital for some time. He has never recovered. Our subject served three years and three months as a musician during the service.

    Retiring from service, Mr. Crane resumed farming in Jackson County, and in Feb. 13, 1865, was married to M. Angeline Smith, daughter of Robert L. and Molly Smith. She was born in Butler County, Pa., June 5, 1836. Her parents were from Pennsylvania. Her great-grandparents, paternal and maternal, emigrated from the Highlands of Scotland and traced their ancestry to Bruce, of Scotland. She was the first one to advocate women's rights in Maquoketa. Her maternal great-grandfather, Sir Thomas Graham, came from Scotland and settled in Butler County, Pa., which county he helped survey. He afterward received 400 acres of land for helping to survey the western part of the State. The grandfather, William Graham, lived all his life in Butler County, Pa. Her paternal great-grandfather, Joseph Smith lived and died in Butler County, Pa. Her father, Robert L., removed from Pennsylvania to Iowa, in 1848, and settled in Clinton County, where he engaged in farming. He was formerly a blacksmith.

    Strongly opposed to slavery, Robert L. Smith was the first abolitionist of Clinton County. He assisted in getting the first slaves across the Mississippi River. Those slaves were started by John Brown and were taken from Nebraska. Mr. Smith kept them at his residence for some time. He transported many of the slaves over the underground railroad for many years. He was the means of delivering as many as 100 from slavery to freedom. His daughter, wife of our subject, assisted her father in the underground railroad in liberating slaves.

    Loved and esteemed by all who knew him, Mr. Smith died, at the age of seventy-two years, in Clinton County. His wife died at the age of sixty-seven years. Their household numbered a large family of children, eight of whom grew to manhood and womanhood. The oldest is the wife of our subject. She was married in 1855 to William Hoisinton, a native of Michigan, and resided in Clinton County till the time of her marriage. They became the parents of one child. This son was given a college education and became a civil engineer in Canada, where he was drowned at the age of twenty-eight years. His name was Elliott. Mr. and Mrs. Crane resided in South Fork Township, and followed farming until October 1886. He still owns 100 acres in South Fork. They have two children - R. Eddie and S. Bird, both of whom are residents of Jackson County.

    ("Portrait and Biographical Album of Jackson County, Iowa", originally published in 1889, by the Chapman Brothers, of Chicago, Illinois)



    Jackson Biographies maintained by Kenneth E. Wright with the
    WebBBS 4.33 Genealogy Modification Package by WebJourneymen.net

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  7. American Civil War Regiments

    Regiment:
    12th Infantry Regiment Iowa

    Date of Organization:
    25 Nov 1861

    Muster Date:
    20 Jan 1866

    Regiment State:
    Iowa

    Regiment Type:
    Infantry

    Regiment Number:
    12th

    Officers Killed or Mortally Wounded:
    4

    Officers Died of Disease or Accident:
    8

    Enlisted Killed or Mortally Wounded:
    76

    Enlisted Died of Disease or Accident:
    260

    Regimental Soldiers and History:
    List of Soldiers

    Regimental History
    Twelfth Infantry IOWA
    (3 years)


    Twelfth Infantry. Cols., Jackson J. Wood, John H. Stibbs;
    Lieut.-Cols., John P. Coulter, Samuel R. Edgington, John H.
    Stibbs; Majs., Samuel D. Brodtbeck, Samuel R. Edgington, John
    H. Stibbs, Edward M. Van Duzee, Samuel G. Knee.

    This regiment was organized at Dubuque in Oct. and Nov. 1861,
    and was mustered in at intervals during those two months. It
    left the state late in November, went into quarters at Benton
    barracks, St. Louis, for two months, and like its
    predecessors, suffered greatly from diseases that seemed to be
    a part of the experience necessary to prepare them for the
    field work. Some 75 died of measles, pneumonia and typhoid.

    At Smithland, Ky., it joined Grant for the movement upon Fort
    Henry, was present at the capture of that place, then moved to
    Fort Donelson, where it took part in the fight and assault
    which resulted in victory. It won immortal glory for itself
    at Shiloh by fighting in the advance until sundown and holding
    back the enemy while the demoralized army withdrew to a new
    point and waited the arrival of Buell. The 8th, 12th and 14th
    IA comprised four-fifths of that advance line and surrendered
    only when surrounded by ten times their numbers. (In the
    history of the 8th will be found an account of the disposition
    of the prisoners until their parole and exchange.) Those who
    escaped capture were assigned to the "Union Brigade" and
    served with it until disbanded, being sent to Davenport, Ia.,
    and remaining there during the winter. The paroled men were
    declared exchanged Jan. 1, 1863, and soon after went to Rolla,
    which was threatened by Marmaduke, but returned on the 15th to
    St. Louis, where they were stationed. Lieut.-Col. Coulter
    resigned and was succeeded by Maj Edgington, and the latter as
    major by Capt. John H. Stibbs of Co D.

    The regiment was reorganized about April 1st and became a part
    of Sherman's command, participating in the movements of that
    division during the Vicksburg campaign, though it was in
    reserve at the assault of May 22. After the surrender it was
    engaged at Jackson and was in the skirmish at and capture of
    Brandon. It went into camp near Bear Creek on July 23 and
    remained there until Oct. 10. Lieut.-Col. Edgington resigned,
    Maj. Stibbs became lieutenant-colonel, and was succeeded as
    major by Capt. Van Duzee.

    In October the regiment was in a skirmish at Brownsville;
    proceeded thence to Vicksburg, Memphis, Lagrange and Chewalla,
    where it remained on railroad guard duty until near the close
    of Jan. 1864. While here it broke up the guerrilla bands that
    were pillaging the country, and built a strong fort. It was
    ordered to join the forces for the Meridian raid, but reached
    Vicksburg too late to take part and went into camp.

    Having been mustered in as a veteran organization, the
    reenlisted men were sent home on a furlough in March. In
    their absence, the non-veterans, numbering about 70,
    accompanied the 35th IA on the Red River campaign and was in
    battle at Lake Chicot. On their return from home the men
    reached Memphis on May 2 and were joined by the detachment
    about the middle of June.

    In May six companies under Lieut.-Col. Stibbs, went to the
    mouth of the White River, established a military post and left
    Cos. A and F under Capt. Hunter. The command proceeded to
    Tupelo, where it was engaged in July. The regiment while
    acting as a train guard, was attacked by a brigade, but
    repelled it in a handsome manner, and in the subsequent
    fighting it occupied the most dangerous post and received
    special commendations of the general commanding.

    Returning to Memphis, the regiment moved to Lagrange, thence
    to Holly Springs, via Lumpkin's Mills, remaining on duty there
    for some time. The detachment at White River in the meantime
    had been busy, protecting the loyal people of that section and
    building a stockade. The little force of but 47 was attacked
    before daybreak on the morning of June 5 by a force of 400,
    the men being compelled to fight in their shirts only, so
    sudden was the attack. A number of the enemy gained the
    stockade at one side, but Sergt. Isaac Cottle and Corp. George
    Hunter, armed with revolvers, boldly attacked them and drove
    them out in confusion. Hunter was shot dead and Cottle was so
    severely wounded that he died soon after, but the entire
    besieging force was finally driven off with a loss of over 50
    in killed, wounded and prisoners, their commanding officer
    being among the slain.

    Joining the regiment at Holly Springs, this detachment
    accompanied it to Oxford, then to Memphis, whence it proceeded
    to Devall's Bluff and Brownsville in search of Price. With 10
    days' rations it made the 350 miles march to Cape Girardeau
    via Jacksonport, Ark., and Jackson, Mo., in 19 days. From St.
    Louis it proceeded to Jefferson City, Smithton, Sedalia,
    Lexington and Independence, into Kansas, and to Harrisonville,
    Mo., after Price but was unable to catch him and returned to
    St. Louis.

    The non-veterans and some of the officers were mustered out,
    Lieut.-Col. Stibbs remaining as commanding officer. Moving to
    Nashville the regiment aided in the defense of that city and
    in the battle in December captured 2 flags. It joined in the
    pursuit as far as Clinton, then proceeded to Eastport, Miss.,
    where it assisted in building quarters and fortifications.
    Lieut.-Col. Stibbs was called to Washington in Jan. 1865, to
    become a member of the military tribunal, the same, which
    later, tried the notorious Capt. Wirz, who was held
    responsible for the infamies of Andersonville prison, and Maj.
    Knee took command.

    The regiment was ordered to Mobile in February, was engaged at
    Spanish Fort in the front line and occupied an exposed
    position for 13 days and nights. At the conclusion of the
    siege of Mobile it moved to Montgomery, thence to Selma and
    remained in guard and garrison duty until the early part of
    1866 when it was mustered out. Lieut.- Col. Stibbs received a
    merited promotion to a colonelcy. The original strength of
    the regiment was 926; gain by recruits, 55, total, 981.

    Source: The Union Army, vol. 4


    Shiloh after battle report:

    Report of Col. Joseph J. Woods, Twelfth Iowa Infantry.

    MAQUOKETA, JACKSON COUNTY, IOWA, April-, 1862.
    On the morning of April 6, the rebels having attacked our advanced
    lines at Shiloh, Tenn., the Twelfth Iowa Infantry was rapidly formed
    and joined the other regiments-the Second, Seventh, and Fourteenth-of
    the Iowa brigade, being the First Brigade, under Brig.-Gen.
    Tuttle, of the Second Division, under Gen. Wallace. The brigade was
    marched to near the field beyond Gen. Hurlbut's headquarters and
    formed in line of battle, the Second and Seventh on our right, the
    Fourteenth on our left. The Eighth Iowa, of Prentiss' division, was on
    the left of the Fourteenth, forming an angle to the rear with our line. An
    open field lay in front of our right. Dense timber covered out left. A
    small ravine was immediately behind us. In this position we awaited the
    approached of the enemy. Soon he made a bold attack on us, but met
    with a warm reception, and soon we repulsed him. Again and again
    repeatedly did he attack us, trying vainly to drive us from our position.
    He failed to move us one inch from our position. On the contrary, we
    repulsed every attack of the enemy and drove him back in confusion.

    Thus matters stood in our front until about 4 p. m., at which time it
    became evident, by the firing on our left, that the enemy were getting
    in our rear. An aide-de-camp rode up and directed me to face to the rear
    and fall back, stating, in answer to my inquiry, that I would receive
    orders as to the position I was to occupy. No such orders reached me,
    and I suppose could not. The Second and Seventh Iowa had already
    gone to the rear, and on reaching the high ground between our position
    and Gen. Hurlbut's headquarters we discovered that we were already
    surrounded by the enemy, caused by no fault of our own, but by the
    troops at a distance from us on our right and left giving
    way before the enemy. Seeing ourselves surrounded, we
    nevertheless opened a brisk fire on that portion of the enemy who
    blocked our passage to the Landing, who, after briskly returning our fire
    for a short time, fell back. A brisk fire from the enemy on our left
    (previous right) was going on at the same time. Seeing the enemy in
    front falling back, we attempted by a rapid movement to cut our way
    through, but the enemy on our left advanced rapidly, coming in behind
    us, pouring into our ranks a most destructive fire. The enemy in front
    faced about and opened on us at short range, the enemy in our rear still
    closing in on us rapidly. I received two wounds, disabling me from
    further duty. The command then devolved on Capt. Edgington, acting
    as field officer. The enemy had, however, already so closely surrounded
    us that their balls which missed our men took effect in their ranks
    beyond us. To have held out longer would have been to suffer complete
    annihilation. The regiment was therefore compelled to surrender as
    prisoners of war.

    Lieut.-Col. Coulter was much reducer by chronic diarrhea and
    Maj. Brodtbeck was suffering from rheumatism. Being myself the only
    field officer on duty, at my request Capt. Edgington acted as a field
    officer, the duties of which he performed in an able and efficient
    manner.

    Quartermaster Dorr, though his position did not require him to go into
    action, volunteered to do so, and throughout the day behaved in a brave
    and gallant manner, daringly, if not recklessly, exposing his person to
    the enemy. He made himself very useful in carrying messages and
    spying out the positions and movements of the enemy and firing on them
    as occasion offered. Energetic and efficient in his own department, he
    would fill a higher one with credit to himself and honor to the service.

    Adjutant Duncan proved himself on this, as on all occasions, a faithful
    and efficient officer.

    Capt.'s Earle, Warner, Stibbs, Haddock, Van Duzee, and Townsley
    performed well their part, as did all the lieutenants in the action, in a
    prompt and willing manner.

    The non-commissioned officers and men stood bravely up to their work
    and never did men behave better.

    In the death of Lieut. Ferguson, of Company D, the regiment lost
    one of its best-drilled officers and a gallant soldier. It also lost a good
    man and a good officer in the of Lieut. Moir, of Company A.

    J. J. WOODS,
    Col. Twelfth Iowa Volunteers.
    ACTING ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GEN., First Brigade, Second
    Division.

    Source: Official Records: Series I. Vol. 10. Part I, Reports. Serial No. 10

    Battles Fought
    Fought on 15 Feb 1862 at Fort Donelson, TN.
    Fought on 6 Apr 1862 at Shiloh, TN.
    Fought on 3 Oct 1862 at Corinth, MS.
    Fought on 4 Oct 1862 at Corinth, MS.
    Fought on 19 May 1863 at Vicksburg, MS.
    Fought on 27 May 1863 at Vicksburg, MS.
    Fought on 11 Jul 1863 at Jackson, MS.
    Fought on 15 Jul 1863 at Jackson, MS.
    Fought on 7 Apr 1864 at Pleasant Hill, LA.
    Fought on 9 Apr 1864 at Pleasant Hill, LA.
    Fought on 6 Jun 1864 at Old Lake Village, AR.
    Fought on 22 Jun 1864 at White River, MO.
    Fought on 13 Jul 1864 at Tupelo, MS.
    Fought on 14 Jul 1864 at Tupelo, MS.
    Fought on 15 Jul 1864 at Tupelo, MS.
    Fought on 15 Dec 1864 at Nashville, TN.
    Fought on 16 Dec 1864 at Nashville, TN.
    Fought on 27 Mar 1865 at Spanish Fort, AL.
    Fought on 29 Mar 1865 at Spanish Fort, AL.
    Fought on 6 Apr 1865 at Spanish Fort, AL.



    Source Information:
    Historical Data Systems,comp.. American Civil War Regiments [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA:Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1999.
    Original data: Datacompiled by Historical Data Systems of Kingston, MA from the following list of works. Copyright 1997-2000
    Historical Data Systems, Inc.
    PO Box 35
    Duxbury, MA 023.
    Description:
    This database contains regiment records from the American Civil War in theUnited States. Learn more...