Place:Greasley, Nottinghamshire, England

Watchers
NameGreasley
Alt namesBeauvalesource: manor in parish
Beggarleesource: settlement in parish
Bog-Endsource: settlement in parish
Brinsleysource: settlement in parish
Giltbrooksource: settlement in parish
Greasley Moor Greensource: settlement in parish
Moor Greensource: alternate name for above
Moorgreensource: alternate name for above
Newthorpesource: settlement in parish
Wagnall Cantelopesource: settlement in parish
Wagnall Chaworthsource: settlement in parish
Chaworthsource: ancient settlement in parish, may relate to Wagnall Chaworth
Watnallsource: settlement in parish, may relate to Wagnall
TypeParish (ancient), Civil parish
Coordinates53.02°N 1.27°W
Located inNottinghamshire, England
See alsoBroxtowe Wapentake, Nottinghamshire, Englandwapentake in which it was located
Basford Rural, Nottinghamshire, Englandrural district 1894-1974
source: Family History Library Catalog
source: Family History Library Catalog
source: Family History Library Catalog
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is based on an article in Wikipedia

Greasley is a civil parish northwest of Nottingham in Nottinghamshire, England. Although it is thought there was once a village called Greasley, there is no settlement of that name today as it was destroyed by the Earl of Rutland so he could have a better view. The built-up areas in the parish are Beauvale, Giltbrook, Moorgreen (often confused with Greasley), Newthorpe, Watnall and parts of Eastwood, Kimberley and Nuthall. There is also a small Hamlet known as Bog-End. In the 2001 UK Census the parish had a total population of 10,467, increasing to 11,014 at the 2011 Census.

Contents

History

For more information, see the EN Wikipedia article Greasley.

A Vision of Britain through Time provides the following description of Greasley from John Marius Wilson's Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales of 1870-72:

"GREASLEY, a hamlet, a parish, and a [registration] sub-district, in Basford [registration] district, Notts. The hamlet was formerly called Greasley Moor Green, -is now called simply Moor Green; lies 2½ miles E of Langley Mill [railway] station, and 7 NW by N of Nottingham; and has a post office, of the game of Moor Green, under Nottingham. The parish includes also the hamlets of Brinsley, Kimberley, Newthorpe, Wagnall Cantelope and Wagnall Chaworth. Acres: 8,010. Real property: £21,852; of which £7,516 are in mines. Population in 1851: 5,284; in 1861: 6,230. Houses: 1,303. The increase of pop. arose from the extension of coal mining. The property is much subdivided. The manor belonged anciently to the Cagtilupes; and belongs now to Lady Palmerston. Some remains exist of Greasley Castle, or ancient manor house, and of Beau-Vale abbey. See BEAU-VALE. The living is a vicarage in the diocese of Lincoln. Value: £134. Patron: Viscount Palmerston. The church is a good stone edivce, with a handsome tower. The chapelries of Brinsley and Kimberely are separate benefices. There are chapels for Independents, Baptists, Wesleyans, Primitive Methodists, New Connexion Methodists, and Free Methodists. There are also a national school, a British school, and charities £62.
"The sub-district contains also five other parishes in Notts, and one and part of another in Derby. Population: 18,028. Houses: 3,619."

Beauvale

A Vision of Britain through Time provides the following description of Beauvale from John Marius Wilson's Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales of 1870-72:

"BEAU-VALE, a manor in Greasley parish, Notts; 7 miles NW of Nottingham. It belonged anciently to the Cantilupes; and had a Carthusian priory, founded by one of that family in the time of Edward III. Some fragments of the ancient manor-house, and some tottering walls of the priory, connected with the offices of a farmyard, still remain.

Brinsley

A Vision of Britain through Time provides the following description of Brinsley from John Marius Wilson's Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales of 1870-72:

"BRINSLEY, or Brunsley, a hamlet and a chapelry in Greasley parish, Notts. The hamlet lies on the river Erewash, the Nottingham canal, and the Midland railway, near High-Park, 7 miles SE by S of Alfreton; and has a post office, of the name of Brinsley, under Alfreton. Population: 1,139; chiefly stocking makers and colliers. The chapelry till very recently was annexed to the vicarage of Greasley, but is now a separate benefice. The living is a vicarage in the diocese of Lincoln. Value: £133. Patron: the Duke of Newcastle. The church was built in 1862. There are two Wesleyan chapels.

Beggarlee

Regular sources provided nothing on Beggarlee save that Wikipedia stated that D. H. Lawrence had used it as the name of a colliery in his novel Sons and Lovers. The writer of the article inferred that the actual colliery was Brinsley. A google search yielded A topographical history of Nottinghamshire by John Curtis (of Ashby-de-la-Zouch) [undated] which discusses the earlier history of Greasley and its various settlements. The book had been photographed and could not be digitally copied.

Newthorpe

A Vision of Britain through Time provides the following description of Newthorpe from John Marius Wilson's Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales of 1870-72:

"NEWTHORPE, a hamlet in Greasley parish, Notts; near the Nottingham canal, 2 miles E of Langley-Mill [railway] station, and 7 N W of Nottingham. It has a post-office under Nottingham, Baptist, Primitive Methodist, and United Free Methodist chapels, and a national school. Population: 1,126. A colliery is at Biggalee [Beggarlee?], and stocking-making is carried on.

Other hamlets were not found in A Vision of Britain through Time.

Research Tips

A map of Nottinghamshire circa 1900 shows all the hamlets within Greasley parish which is between Nottingham and Eastwood.

This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Greasley. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.