Person:William Moore (228)

Watchers
m. Bef. 1748
  1. Capt. William MooreABT 1748 - 1841
  2. Hon. Andrew Moore, U.S. Senator1752 - 1821
  3. David Moore1755-1762 - 1826
  4. Jennet 'Jenny' Mooreest 1761 -
m. 8 FEB 1779
  1. Isabella Moore1779-1805 -
  2. Elizabeth Moore1779-1805 -
  3. Nancy Moore1779-1805 -
  4. Jane Moore1779-1805 -
  5. Eliab Moore1779-1805 -
  6. David Moore1779-1805 -
  7. John Moore1779-1805 -
  8. Samuel Moore1779-1805 -
Facts and Events
Name Capt. William Moore
Gender Male
Birth? ABT 1748 Augusta County, Virginia
Marriage 8 FEB 1779 Rockbridge County, Virginiato Nancy McClung
Death? 1841 Lexington, Rockbridge County, Virginia

William Moore was one of the Early Settlers of Augusta County, Virginia

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Records in Rockbridge County, VA

In the fall of 1781 John McClung Sr., was taken to the home of son, John McClung, Jr. shortly after his wife died and before he quit housekeeping. Not content there, he returned shortly to his own home. After his daughter, Janett, married, he lived with daughter Nancy [McClung] Moore and her husband William Moore from the Spring of 1782 until his death in 1787. His estate was in litigation for many years [See "William Moore vs. [John] McClung's Heirs" in Rockbridge, some excerpts listed below]. All children, many grandchildren, and depositions from them and other people were recorded in Chancery Court documents. A decree issued by Superior Court of Chancery held at Staunton 12-5-1810 ordered William Moore and wife Nancy [McClung], daughter of John McClung, Sr. to convey their interest in the land to Joseph McClung of Greenbrier Co., VA (Aug.Co. Chancery Ct records and Rockbridge Co. DB H, 119). Joseph McClung of Greenbrier Co., Va, sold land to John McClung, Rockbridge Co., by deed dated 10-28-1812 (Rkbg DB H,204). Administration of estate of John McClung dec., granted William Moore 2-1788 Rockbridge Co. Court; inventory and appraisement of personal estate recorded 6-7-1791, Rockbridge Co. Court.

  • In the fall of 1781 John McClung Sr., was taken to the home of son, John McClung, Jr. shortly after his wife died and before he quit housekeeping. Not content there, he returned shortly to his own home. After his daughter, Janett, married, he lived with Nancy [McClung] Moore from the Spring of 1782 until his death in 1787. His estate was in litigation for many years. All children, many grandchildren, and depositions from them and other people were recorded in Chancery Court documents. A decree issued by Superior Court of Chancery held at Staunton 12-5-1810 ordered William Moore and wife Nancy [McClung], daughter of John McClung, Sr. to convey their interest in the land to Joseph McClung of Greenbrier Co., VA (Aug.Co. Chancery Ct records and Rockbridge Co. DB H, 119). Joseph McClung of Greenbrier Co., Va, sold land to John McClung, Rockbridge Co., by deed dated 10-28-1812 (Rkbg DB H,204). Administration of estate of John McClung dec., granted William Moore 2-1788 Rockbridge Co. Court; inventory and appraisement of personal estate recorded 6-7-1791, Rockbridge Co. Court. [1]
  • 10 February 1792: [Wm. Moore v. McClung's Heirs (John McClung)]: The Commonwealth afs. of Virginia. To the Sheriff of _______ County. Greeting you are hereby commanded to summon John McClung, Junr., Alexander McClung, Charles McClung, Edward McClung, Jennet McClung & Rachel McClung Heirs of Thomas McClung Deceased, Mary McClung, Jennet McClung, William McClung Heirs of James McClung Deceased & John McClung, Samuel McClung, Edward McClung & Charles McClung, Wm. McClung, David Moore & Jennit his wife Heirs of John McClung Snr. Deceased to Appear before the Justices of our Court of Rockbridge County at the Courthouse on the first Tuesday in march next then and there to answer & Bill in Chancery Exhibited against them by William Moore and this they shall in no wise Owrit [?] under the penalty of one hundred pounds each, and have then there this Writ. Witness Andrew Reid Clerk of our said County Court of Rockbridge at the Courthouse the 15th Day of February 1792 - and in the 16th year of our Foundation.
(Signed) A. Reid.
  • 12 November 1799: [Wm. Moore v. McClung's Heirs (John McClung)]: The Answer of John McClung son of Thomas [McClung] to the Bill of complaint against himself & others exhibited in the County Court of Rockbridge by Joseph McClung. This answer being for himself & also as Guardian for Rachel McClung & Thomas McClung infants & orphans of the said Thomas McClung deceas. and for Jinney McClung, Sally McClung, Polly McClung & Edward McClung Infts. & orphans of Edward McClung dec'd. [Note: this record is critical in proving that Thomas McClung lived past the Battle of Point Pleasant in 1774. Since his children Rachel and Thomas [Jr.] were identified as "infants & orphans" of Thomas McClung, Sr., they would have been born AFTER 1778 [under age 21 in 1799], thereby disproving the notion that Thomas McClung Sr. had died in 1774]
  • 12 November 1799: [Wm. Moore v. McClung's Heirs (John McClung)]: The joint answer of Alexander McClung, Edward McClung 8 Jane McClung children of Thomas McClung dec'd and Joseph Dixon & Nancy his wife late Nancy McClung daughter of James McClung dec'd to the Bill of complaint exhibited in Rockbridge Court against them & others by Joseph McClung. These defendants saving to themselves all just proper exceptions to the Complaintants Bill for answers thereto saith - That they know only from information that the sales mentioned from their Grandfather to their Uncle James, from him to Edward & from him to the Complaint. took place - However if the Complaintant can prove to the satisfaction of the Court that said sales did actually take place they cannot in justice prove his demand. Wherefore, they pray to be hence discharged.
  • 12 November 1799 - [Wm. Moore vs. Heirs of John McClung, Rockbridge County, VA] - Edward McClung & Jane McClung children of Thomas McClung Deceas'd came before me a Justice of the Peace for said County and made oath that the within file is justly stated as far as relates to their knowledge. Given under my hand this 12th day of November 1799. (Signed) James McCay.

Notes

http://www.roanetnhistory.org/bookread.php?loc=WaddellsAnnals&pgid=243

THE MOORES. David Moore, with his mother and ten brothers and a sister, came from the north of Ireland to America, and settled in Borden’s Grant. The maiden name of the mother was Baxter. When a young girl, she was in Londonderry, during the famous siege of 1689. David Moore’s wife was Mary Evans, and his sons were William and Andrew.

WILLIAM MOORE was born about the year 1748, at Cannicello, now in Rockbridge county, and received a plain education at schools in the neighborhood. From his boyhood he was remarkable for his temperate habits, intrepidity, and great physical strength. At times, when the country was in a state of alarm on account of the Indians, he would take solitary excursions and remain out all night by himself. In 1774, he participated in the battle of Point Pleasant. During the action, John Steele was wounded and about to be scalped, when Moore interposed, shooting one Indian and knocking down another with his rifle. He then shouldered Steele, who was a very large and heavy man, and after laying him down in a safe place nearly two miles off, returned to the fight. Steele was accustomed to say, “There was no other man in the army who could have done it, if he would; and no other who would have done it, if he could.” Moore is believed to have been in the military service during the whole war of the Revolution, and at the surrender of Cornwallis, he held the rank of captain.

After the war, Captain Moore settled in Lexington as a merchant. It is said that he brought to that town the first sack of coffee ever seen there. Like most enterprising men, however, he was “in advance of his age.” His customers were not acquainted with coffee, and it remained unsold till some Pennsylvanians arrived and purchased it. The people of Lexington and vicinity were quicker to learn the use of tea. As explained by an old lady living there, her husband “drank the broth,” and she “ate the greens.”

After merchandising in Lexington, Captain Moore had an iron furnace on South River, Rockbridge, and then lived near Fairfield. For many years he was a justice of the peace, and was high sheriff for two terms. He died in Lexington in 1841, aged ninety-three.

The wife of Captain Moore was Nancy McClung, and his children were Samuel, David, John, Eliab, Jane, Isabella, Elizabeth and Nancy.