Place:Warren, Kentucky, United States

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Warren County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky, specifically the Pennyroyal Plateau and Western Coal Fields regions. It is included in the Bowling Green, Kentucky, Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 113,792 in the 2010 Census. The county seat is Bowling Green. Generally the county is dry, prohibiting the sale of alcohol, but retail alcohol sales are allowed in the "wet city" of Bowling Green; Warren County is classified as a moist county.

Contents

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Warren County was the location of several Native American villages and burial mounds. The first white men to enter the area were the long hunters in the 1770s. General Elijah Covington was among the first landowners. McFadden's Station, one of the earliest settlements, was established in 1785 by Andrew McFadden on the northern bank of the Barren River at the Cumberland Trace.

Warren County became the 23rd county of Kentucky in 1796, from a section of Logan County. It was named after General Joseph Warren of the Revolutionary War. He dispatched William Dawes and Paul Revere on their famous midnight ride to warn residents of the approaching British troops. He was also a hero of the Battle of Bunker Hill.

Through the riverboat trade, Warren County thrived in the agricultural market. In 1859, the Louisville and Nashville Railroad (currently CSX Transportation) was laid through the county.

During the Civil War, most residents are said to have favored the Confederacy. Because of its strategic value Warren County was occupied by Confederate forces in September 1861. It was occupied in turn by the Union Army on February 14, 1862, following the Confederate retreat to Tennessee. During the Confederate withdrawal, they destroyed railroad bridges in Barren County, the Bowling Green train depot and other railroad buildings to hinder Union pursuit.

The completion of Interstate 65 and Green River Parkway (currently the William H. Natcher Parkway) in the 1960s and 1970s, brought an industrial boom that transformed the farm-oriented county into a more urban one.

In 1997, Bowling Green became a Tree City USA, sponsored by the National Arbor Day Foundation.

Timeline

Date Event Source
1796 Court records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1796 Probate records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1797 County formed Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1797 Land records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1797 Marriage records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1800 First census Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
1830 No significant boundary changes after this year Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
1852 Birth records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources

Population History

source: Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
Census Year Population
1800 4,686
1810 11,937
1820 11,776
1830 10,949
1840 15,446
1850 15,123
1860 17,320
1870 21,742
1880 27,531
1890 30,158
1900 29,970
1910 30,579
1920 30,858
1930 33,676
1940 36,631
1950 42,758
1960 45,491
1970 57,432
1980 71,828
1990 76,673

Research Tips

External links

www.rootsweb.com/~kywarren/


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