Place:Wallowa, Oregon, United States

Watchers
NameWallowa
Alt namesWallowasource: Getty Vocabulary Program
TypeCounty
Coordinates45.5°N 117.167°W
Located inOregon, United States     (1887 - )
See alsoUnion, Oregon, United StatesParent county (source: Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990)
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Wallowa County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oregon. It is included in the eight-county definition of Eastern Oregon. As of the 2010 census, the population was 7,008. Its seat is Enterprise. According to Oregon Geographic Names, the origins of the county's name are uncertain, with the most likely explanation being that it is derived from the Nez Perce term for a structure of stakes (a weir) used in fishing. An alternative explanation is that Wallowa is derived from a Nez Perce word for "winding water". The journals of Lewis and Clark Expedition record the name of the Wallowa River as Wil-le-wah.

Contents

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

In 1871, the first white settlers came to the area, crossing the mountains in search of livestock feed in the Wallowa Valley. The county was established on February 11, 1887,[1] from the eastern portion of Union County. Boundary changes occurred with Union County in 1890, 1900, and 1915.

In 1877, the younger Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce, incensed at the government's attempt to deprive his people of the Wallowa Valley, refused to be moved to an Idaho reservation. Several regiments of United States troops were dispatched to force him onto the reservation. After several battles and a march of almost two thousand miles towards sanctuary in Canada, Chief Joseph was forced to surrender in Montana, forty miles from the Canadian border. He and some of the survivors from his band were detained in Oklahoma, and later were relocated to Colville Reservation in Washington State. Approximately half of the survivors moved to the Nez Perce Reservation in Idaho. Chief Joseph last visited Wallowa County in 1902.

Wallowa County was the scene of perhaps the worst incident of violence against Chinese in Oregon, when in May 1887 a gang of rustlers massacred 10-34 Chinese gold miners in Hells Canyon. Of the seven rustlers and schoolboys believed to have been responsible, only three were brought to trial in Enterprise, where a jury found them not guilty on September 1, 1888. A proposal to commemorate this event on official maps as Chinese Massacre Cove was approved in 2005 and encompasses a five acre site.

Wallowa County Courthouse was built in 1909-1910 using locally quarried Bowlby stone, a type of volcanic tuff. The courthouse is a Romanesque Revival-style building with Queen Anne architectural elements in some exterior features. The courthouse was listed on National Register of Historic Places in 2000. Today, the courthouse still houses Wallowa County government offices. The courthouse faces west toward South River Street and is surrounded by Courthouse Square which encompasses one city block, approximately 1.3 acres. The square is landscaped with oak, pine, maple, linden, juniper, and flowering crab apple trees. There are roses planted on the north, west, and south sides of the courthouse. The square also has several veteran memorials along with a by wood-framed gazebo in the northeast corner of the square.


United States Supreme Court Associate Justice William O. Douglas was one famous summer visitor to Wallowa County, building a vacation cabin on Lostine River Road in 1939.

In December 2003, a developer announced a proposal to buy a property near Wallowa Lake, and build 11 homes on it. This property is adjacent to the property that is home to the grave of Old Chief Joseph, father of the younger Chief Joseph. This proposal drew opposition from a local group, as well as from the Nez Perce, Colville, and Umatilla tribes. Prior offers by the National Park Service and the Trust for Public Land to buy the land were rejected. The County commissioners gave conditional approval for the developers to complete a final plat of the land on February 13, 2004, but the attorney for the Nez Perce said the tribe would appeal the decision to the Oregon Land Use Board of Appeals.

Timeline

Date Event Source
1875 Land records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1879 Marriage records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1886 Probate records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1887 County formed Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1887 Court records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1890 First census Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
1900 No significant boundary changes after this year Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
1905 Birth records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources

Population History

source: Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
Census Year Population
1890 3,661
1900 5,538
1910 8,364
1920 9,778
1930 7,814
1940 7,623
1950 7,264
1960 7,102
1970 6,247
1980 7,273
1990 6,911

Research Tips

External links

www.co.wallowa.or.us/


This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Wallowa County, Oregon. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.