Place:Wakulla, Florida, United States

Watchers
NameWakulla
Alt namesWakullasource: Getty Vocabulary Program
TypeCounty
Coordinates30.167°N 84.333°W
Located inFlorida, United States     (1843 - )
See alsoLeon, Florida, United StatesParent county (source: Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990)
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Wakulla County is a county located in the U.S. state of Florida. The 2000 census recorded the population to be 22,863. Ten years later, the population jumped to 30,776, an increase of 7,913 persons, with a nearly 26% population increase. Its county seat is Crawfordville.

Wakulla County has a near-absence of any municipal population, with two small municipalities holding about 3% of the population. The county seat, Crawfordville, is the only unincorporated county seat among Florida's 67 counties.

Wakulla County is part of the Tallahassee, Florida, Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Contents

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Spanish rule

In 1528, Panfilo de Narvaez found his way to what would be Wakulla County from Tampa, Florida camping at the confluence of the Wakulla River and St. Marks River. Narvaez would find this a very suitable spot for a fort. In 1539, Hernando de Soto followed with his soldiers establishing San Marcos de Apalache.

Early 19th century

The area to become Wakulla County was an active place in the early 19th century. A former British officer named William Augustus Bowles attempted to unify and lead 400 Creek Indians against the Spanish outpost of San Marcos capturing it. This provoked Spain and a Spanish flotilla arrived some 5 weeks later and assumed control of San Marcos. In 1818, General Andrew Jackson invaded the territory (Wakulla) taking control of San Marcos. Two captured British citizens, Robert Ambrister and Alexander Arbuthnot, were tried and found guilty of inciting Indian raids and executed causing a diplomatic nightmare between the United States and England. In 1821, Florida was ceded to the United States and the San Marcos was occupied by U.S. troops. In 1824, the fort was abandoned and turned over to the Territory of Florida. By 1839, the fort was returned to the U.S. and a federal marine hospital was built. The hospital provided care for victims of yellow fever in the area.

Forts of Wakulla County

  • 1840 - Camp Lawson, northwest of Wakulla and northeast of Ivan, on the St. Marks River. A log stockade also known as Fort Lawson (2).
  • 1841-1842 - Fort Many located near Wakulla Springs.
  • 1839 - Fort Number Five (M) located near Sopchoppy.
  • 1839-1843 - Fort Stansbury was located on the Wakulla River from St. Marks.
  • 1841-1843 - Fort Port Leon. Abandoned after a hurricane destroyed it. Site was later used for a CSA gun battery.
  • 1839 - James Island Post located on James Island.

Source: Florida Forts

Antebellum Wakulla

Wakulla County was created from Leon County in 1843. It may (although this is disputed) be named for the Timucuan Indian word for "spring of water" or "mysterious water." This is in reference to Wakulla County's greatest natural attraction, Wakulla Springs, which is one of the world's largest freshwater springs, both in terms of depth and water flow. In 1974, the water flow was measured at per day—the greatest recorded flow ever for a single spring.

In an 1856 book, adventurer Charles Lanman wrote of the springs: Another possible origin for the name Wakulla, not as widely accepted, is that it means "mist" or "misting", perhaps in reference to the Wakulla Volcano, a 19th-century phenomenon in which a column of smoke could be seen emerging from the swamp for miles.

The town of Port Leon was once a thriving cotton-shipping hub, with a railroad that carried over 50,000 tons of cotton a year to be put on ships, usually for shipment direct to Europe. Port Leon was the sixth-largest town in Florida, with 1,500 residents. However, a hurricane and the accompanying storm surge wiped out the entire town. New Port (today known as Newport) was built two miles (3 km) upstream but never quite achieved the prosperity of Port Leon.

Civil War

During the Civil War, Wakulla County was blockaded from 1861-1865 by a Union squadron at the mouth of the St. Marks River. Confederates took the old Spanish fort site known as San Marcos de Apalache and renamed it Fort Ward. The Battle of Natural Bridge eventually stopped the Union force that intended to take Fort Ward and nearby Tallahassee, the last Confederate state capitol which the Union had not captured. The Union forces were not able to land their full forces, but still outnumbered the Confederates, who chose to make their stand at a place where the St Marks River goes underground—the "Natural Bridge' referred to. However, the Confederates had over a day to prepare their defenses and the Union retreated. Most of the dead were African-American troops fighting for the Union.

The Twentieth Century

In Gloria Jahoda's book, The Other Florida, she writes movingly of the extreme poverty of Wakulla County from the early 1900s to 1966, when Wakulla still had no doctor and no dentist, few stores and a county newspaper produced just once a month on a mimeograph machine.[1] Today, Wakulla has several doctors and dentists, several supermarkets and big-box retailers, a golf resort and a thriving seafood business.

Timeline

Date Event Source
1843 County formed Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1843 Court records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1843 Land records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1850 First census Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
1850 No significant boundary changes after this year Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
1892 Marriage records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1892 Probate records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources

Population History

source: Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
Census Year Population
1850 1,955
1860 2,839
1870 2,506
1880 2,723
1890 3,117
1900 5,149
1910 4,802
1920 5,129
1930 5,468
1940 5,463
1950 5,258
1960 5,257
1970 6,308
1980 10,887
1990 14,202

Research Tips

External links

http://mailer.fsu.edu/~rthompso/wakulla.html


This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Wakulla County, Florida. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.