Place:Vaud, Switzerland

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NameVaud
Alt namesCanton of Vaudsource: Wikipedia
Lémansource: Canby, Historic Places (1984) II, 983
Waadtsource: Rand McNally Atlas (1991) I-188
TypeCanton
Coordinates46.667°N 6.5°E
Located inSwitzerland     (1803 - )
Contained Places
District
Aigle (district)
Aubonne (district)
Avenches (district)
Cossonay (district)
Grandson (district)
La Vallée
Lavaux
Orbe (district)
Payerne (district)
Rolle (district)
Yverdon
Inhabited place
Aigle
Allaman
Apples
Assens
Aubonne
Avenches
Ballaigues
Baulmes
Bex
Bière
Blonay
Bottens
Chavornay
Cheseaux
Chexbres
Château d'Oex
Concise
Coppet
Cossonay
Crassier
Cully
Echallens
Gland
Grandson ( 1000 - )
Henniez
L'Isle
La Sarraz
La Tour-de-Peilz
Le Brassus
Le Pont
Les Avants
Les Diablerets
Les Mosses
Leysin
Lucens
Lutry
Mathod
Montcherand
Montreux
Morges
Moudon
Nyon
Ollon ( 500 - )
Orbe
Oron-la-Ville
Palézieux
Paudex
Payerne
Perroy
Prangins
Prilly
Puidoux
Pully
Renens
Roche
Rolle
Romainmôtier
Rougemont
Saint-Cergue
Saint-Maurice
Saint-Prex
Saint-Sulpice
Saint-Triphon
Sainte-Croix
Salavaux
Sottens
Vallorbe
Vevey
Villars
Villeneuve
Vuiteboeuf
Yvonand
Yvorne
Municipality
Champagne
Unknown
Aclens
Agiez
Arnex-sur-Orbe
Arzier
Ballens
Bassins
Bavois
Begnins
Bellerive
Belmont
Belmont-sur-Lausanne
Belmont-sur-Yverdon
Bercher
Berolle
Bettens
Bioley-Orjulaz
Bonvillars
Boulens
Bournens
Boussens
Bretigny
Bretigny-sur-Morrens
Bretonniéres
Buchillon
Bullet
Bursinel
Bursins
Burtigny
Bussigny-sur-Morges
Bussy-sur-Morges
Chamblon
Champvent
Chardonne
Chatillens
Chavannes-le-Chêne
Chavannes-près-Renens
Chesalles-sur-Moudon
Cheseaux-sur-Lausanne
Cheserex
Chessel
Chevroux
Chigny
Chêne-Pâquier
Clarens
Clarmont
Colombier
Combremont
Commugny
Constantine
Corbeyrier
Corcelles-le-Jorat
Corcelles-près-Payerne
Corcelles-sur-Chavornay
Correvon
Corsier-sur-Velez
Corsier-sur-Vevey
Cossonay-Ville
Cottens
Cotterd
Crans-près-Céligny
Crissier
Cronay
Cuarnens
Cuarny
Cudrefin
Curtilles
Daillens
Denens
Denezy
Dommartin
Dompierre
Donatyre
Donneloye
Duillier
Dully
Démoret
Echandens
Echichens
Eclagnens
Eclépens
Ecublens
Epalinges
Epauteyres
Ependes
Essertines-sur-Rolle
Essertines-sur-Yverdon
Etagnières
Etoy
Faoug
Fey
Fiez
Fontaines-sur-Grandson
Genolier
Giez
Gilly
Gimel
Gingins
Gollion
Goumoëns-la-Ville
Grancy
Grandcour
Grandes-près-Marnand
Grandvaux
Granges-près-Marnand
Grens
Gressy
Gryon
Huémoz
L'Abbaye
L'Etivaz
La Chaux
La Coudre
La Robelaz
Lausanne
Lavey-Morcles
Lavigny
Le Chenit
Le Lieu
Le Mont-sur-Lausanne
Le Muids
Le Sentier
Les Clées
Lignerolle
Lonay
Longirod
Luins
Lully
Lussy-sur-Morges
Maracon
Marchissy
Mauborget
Mauraz
Mex
Missy
Mollens
Molondin
Monnaz
Mont-la-Ville
Mont-sur-Rolle
Montagny-près-Yverdon
Montet
Montheron
Montpreveyres
Montricher
Morrens
Mézery-près-Donneloye
Mézières
Neyruz
Novalles
Noville
Ogens
Onnens
Oppens
Orges
Ormont-Dessous
Ormont-Dessus
Orny
Oron-le-Châtel
Orzens
Oulens-sous-Echallens
Pailly
Palézieux-Village
Pampigny
Pays-d'Enhaut
Peney-le-Jorat
Penthalaz
Penthaz
Penthéréaz
Poliez-Pittet
Poliez-le-Grand
Poliez-le-Pittet
Pomy
Provence
Rances
Rennaz
Ressudens
Reverolle
Rivaz
Romanel-sur-Lausanne
Romanel-sur-Morges
Rossinière
Rovray
Rueyres
Saint-Barthélemy
Saint-Cierges
Saint-George
Saint-Livres
Saint-Oyens
Saint-Saphorin
Saint-Saphorin-sur-Morges
Saubraz
Savigny
Suchy
Sugnens
Sullens
Syens
Sévery
Thierrens
Tolochenaz
Trelex
Trey
Ursins
Valeyres-sous-Montagny
Valeyres-sous-Rances
Valeyres-sous-Ursins
Vaugondry
Vaulion
Vaux-sur-Morges
Vich
Villars-Bozon
Villars-Mendraz
Villars-Tiercelin
Villars-le-Comte
Villars-le-Grand
Villars-le-Terroir
Villars-sous-Yens
Villarzel
Villette
Vinzel
Vuarrens
Vufflens-la-Ville
Vufflens-le-Château
Vugelles-la-Mothe
Vullierens
Yens
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Vaud is the third largest of Swiss cantons by population and fourth by size. It is located in Romandie, the French-speaking western part of the country, and borders the canton of Neuchâtel to the north, the cantons of Fribourg and Bern to the east, Valais and Lake Geneva to the south, the canton of Geneva to the south-west and France to the west.

The capital is Lausanne, officially designated "Olympic Capital" by the International Olympic Committee and host to many sport organizations. The canton had 725,944 inhabitants as of 2011.

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Along the lakes, Vaud was inhabited in prehistoric times. Later, the Celtic tribe of the Helvetii inhabited the area. The tribe was defeated by Caesar's troops in 58 BC and as a consequence the Romans settled the area. The towns of Vevey and Lausanne (Lausonium or Lausonna) are two of the many towns established by the Romans.

In 27 BC the state of Civitas Helvetiorum was established around the capital of Avenches (Aventicum). There are still many Roman remains around the town today. Between the 2nd and the 4th century the area was repeatedly invaded by Alemannic tribes, and in the 5th century the Burgundians occupied the area. The Merovingian Franks later replaced the Burgundians. Their occupancy did not last long either, and in 888 the area of the canton of Vaud was made part of the Carolingian Empire. In 1032 the Zähringens of Germany defeated the Burgundians. The Zähringens themselves were succeeded in 1218 by the counts of Savoy. It was only under the counts of Savoy that the area was given political unity, establishing the Barony of Vaud. A part stretching from Attalens to the River Sarine, in the north, was absorbed by the canton of Fribourg.


As the power of the Savoys declined at the beginning of the 15th century the land was occupied by troops from Bern. By 1536 the area was completely annexed. Reformation was started by co-workers of John Calvin like Pierre Viret, including a famous debate at the cathedral of Lausanne; but it was only decisively implemented when Bern put its full force behind it.

The Bernese occupants were not popular amongst the population. In 1723, Major Abraham Davel led a revolt against Bern, in protest at what he saw as the denial of political rights of the French-speaking Vaudois by the German-speaking Bernese, and was subsequently beheaded. Later, inspired by the French Revolution, the Vaudois drove out the Bernese governor in 1798 and declared the Lemanic Republic. Vaud nationalists like Frédéric-César de La Harpe had called for French intervention in liberating the area and French Revolutionary troops moved in, taking over the whole of Switzerland itself in the process and setting up the Helvetic Republic. Under Napoleon I, it became the canton of Léman. Unrest about the abolition of feudal rights and taxes led to increased discontent, which culminated in the revolt of the Bourla-papey in Spring 1802, closely followed by the Stecklikrieg that brought the end of the entire Helvetic Republic. In 1803, Vaud joined the re-installed Swiss confederation. In spite of Bernese attempts to reclaim Vaud, it has remained a sovereign canton ever since.

In the 19th century, the canton of Vaud was an outspoken opponent of the Sonderbund Catholic separatist movement, which led to intervention in 1847 by 99,000 Swiss Federal troops under General Henri Dufour against 79,000 separatists, in what is called the Sonderbund War. Separation was prevented at the cost of very few lives. The current constitution dates from 14 April 2003, replacing the one from 1885.

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