Place:Tower Hamlets (London Borough), Greater London, England

Watchers
NameTower Hamlets (London Borough)
TypeBorough (metropolitan)
Coordinates51.52°N 0.05°W
Located inGreater London, England     (1965 - )
See alsoTower Hamlets, Middlesex, EnglandAncient liberty in Middlesex from which the borough takes its name
Stepney (metropolitan borough), London, Englandmetropolitan boroughs of the County of London making up Tower Hamlets Borough
Poplar, London, Englandmetropolitan boroughs of the County of London making up Tower Hamlets Borough
Bethnal Green, London, Englandmetropolitan boroughs of the County of London making up Tower Hamlets Borough
Contained Places
Cemetery
Tower Hamlets Cemetery ( 1965 - )
the following text is based on an article in Wikipedia

The London Borough of Tower Hamlets is a London borough to the east of the City of London and north of the River Thames. It is in the eastern part of London and covers much of the traditional East End. It also includes much of the redeveloped Docklands region of London, including West India Docks and Canary Wharf. Many of the tallest buildings in London occupy the centre of the Isle of Dogs in the south of the borough. A part of the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park is in Tower Hamlets. According to the UK census of 2011, the borough had a population of 272,890, which includes one of the highest ethnic minority populations in the capital. The Borough has an established British Bangladeshis business and residential community.

The Borough was made up of three Metropolitan Boroughs from the County of London:

Before 1965 the boundary between the County of London and the county of Essex was also the eastern border of Poplar and Bethnal Green. To the north of Tower Hamlets is the London Borough of Hackney.

Geography

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia


History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia
Tower Hamlets forms the main area of the East End of London. More detailed local histories may be available for each of the districts (above) within Tower Hamlets.

Tower Hamlets earliest visable use is in the sixteenth century when the Constable of the Tower of London commanded the Tower Hamlet Militia as Lord Lieutenant of Tower Hamlets. The Hamlets of the Tower paid taxes for the militia 1646

The London Borough of Tower Hamlets forms the core of the East End. It lies east of the ancient walled City of London and north of the River Thames. Use of the term "East End" in a pejorative sense began in the late 19th century, as the expansion of the population of London led to extreme overcrowding throughout the area and a concentration of poor people and immigrants in the districts that made it up. These problems were exacerbated with the construction of St Katharine Docks (1827) and the central London railway termini (1840–1875) that caused the clearance of former slums and rookeries, with many of the displaced people moving into the area. Over the course of a century, the East End became synonymous with poverty, overcrowding, disease and criminality.

The East End developed rapidly during the 19th century. Originally it was an area characterised by villages clustered around the City walls or along the main roads, surrounded by farmland, with marshes and small communities by the River, serving the needs of shipping and the Royal Navy. Until the arrival of formal docks, shipping was required to land goods in the Pool of London, but industries related to construction, repair, and victualling of ships flourished in the area from Tudor times. The area attracted large numbers of rural people looking for employment. Successive waves of foreign immigration began with Huguenot refugees creating a new extramural suburb in Spitalfields in the 17th century. They were followed by Irish weavers, Ashkenazi Jews and, in the 20th century, Bangladeshis. Many of these immigrants worked in the clothing industry. The abundance of semi- and unskilled labour led to low wages and poor conditions throughout the East End. This brought the attentions of social reformers during the mid-18th century and led to the formation of unions and workers associations at the end of the century. The radicalism of the East End contributed to the formation of the Labour Party and demands for the enfranchisement of women.

Official attempts to address the overcrowded housing began at the beginning of the 20th century under the London County Council. World War II devastated much of the East End, with its docks, railways and industry forming a continual target, leading to dispersal of the population to new suburbs, and new housing being built in the 1950s.[1] During the war, in the Boroughs making up Tower Hamlets a total of 2,221 civilians were killed and 7,472 were injured, with 46,482 houses destroyed and 47,574 damaged. The closure of the last of the East End docks in the Port of London in 1980 created further challenges and led to attempts at regeneration and the formation of the London Docklands Development Corporation. The Canary Wharf development, improved infrastructure, and the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park mean that the East End is undergoing further change, but some of its districts continue to contain some of the worst poverty in Britain.

Research Tips

  • See wiki.familysearch.org under "London" and also under "Middlesex" for key information about Greater London's jurisdictions and records, plus links to indexes, reference aids and Family History Library holdings.
  • A very useful FREE site for anyone researching their London ancestors between the years 1690-1800 is London Lives. This is a fully searchable edition of 240,000 manuscripts from eight archives and fifteen datasets, giving access to 3.35 million names.
  • London Ancestor, a website belonging to one of the London family history societies, has a list of transcriptions of directories from the 18th century, listing in one case "all the squares, streets, lanes, courts, yards, alleys, &C. in and about Five Miles of the Metropolis..." In other parts of the same website are maps of various parts of 19th century London and Middlesex.
  • The proceedings of the Old Bailey, London's central criminal court, 1674-1913. A fully searchable edition of the largest body of texts detailing the lives of non-elite people ever published, containing 197,745 criminal trials held at London's central criminal court. This site is FREE to use.
  • Registration Districts in London, Registration Districts in Middlesex, Registration Districts in Surrey, Registration Districts in Kent, are lists of the registration districts used for civil registration (births, marriages and deaths, as well as the censuses). There are linked supporting lists of the parishes which made up each registration district, the dates of formation and abolition of the districts, the General Register Office numbers, and the local archive-holding place. This work has been carried out by Brett Langston under the agency of GENUKI (Genealogy United Kingdom and Ireland) and UKBMD - Births, Marriages, Deaths & Censuses on the Internet.
This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at London Borough of Tower Hamlets. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.
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