Place:Tickhill, West Riding of Yorkshire, England

Watchers
NameTickhill
TypeTown, Urban district
Coordinates53.433°N 1.111°W
Located inWest Riding of Yorkshire, England     ( - 1974)
Also located inSouth Yorkshire, England     (1974 - )
Yorkshire, England    
See alsoDoncaster (metropolitan borough), South Yorkshire, Englandmetropolitan borough of which it has been a part since 1974
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog
source: Family History Library Catalog
the following text is based on an article in Wikipedia

Tickhill is a small town and civil parish in the Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster in South Yorkshire, England, on the border with Nottinghamshire. According to the UK census of 2001, it has a population of 5,301.

It lies eight miles south of Doncaster, between Maltby and Harworth, on the busy conjunction of the A631 and A60 roads, and adjacent to the A1(M) motorway. The River Torne passes close to the south-east of the town where it is the boundary between South Yorkshire and Nottinghamshire, eventually meeting the River Trent.

Notable buildings in Tickhill include the substantial ruins of Tickhill Castle which contain a private residence leased by the Duchy of Lancaster, St Mary's Church – a large 13th-century parish church, the parish rooms, an old hospital called St. Leonard's, and the Buttercross.

Historically, Tickhill was an ecclesiastical parish in the lower division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill. From 1894 until 1974, Tickhill was an urban district within the West Riding of Yorkshire. It absorbed the parish of Tickhill Outer in 1895.

Contents

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

William I

Shortly after the Norman Invasion, William I of England gave the lands around Tickhill to Roger de Busli, who built a castle on a small hill. Richard de Busli, grandson of Roger's brother Arnold, co-founded nearby Roche Abbey with Richard FitzTurgis in 1147.



Middle Ages

During the Middle Ages, Tickhill was the second most important town, after Doncaster, in what is now South Yorkshire. The Domesday Book lists the settlement under the former estate centre at Dadsley, now lying on the northern edge of the village. Dadsley was served by a church atop All Hallows Hill, which by 1361 had been downgraded to a chapel. Evidence suggests that the chapel was unused after the English Reformation, and was razed in the mid-17th century.[1]

Tickhill's eponymous hill was probably the base of what is now the motte of Tickhill Castle. The town grew up around the castle, and St Mary's was built soon after to replace All Hallows as the settlement's main church.[1]

Initially, Tickhill was one of England's most successful new towns. It gained a friary and St Leonard's Hospital. The Guild of St Cross was established in the town, and it is believed to have acted as the settlement's main governing body. In 1295, Tickhill sent two members to Parliament, but did not do so subsequently.[1]

Sixteenth century

As castles declined in importance during the mediaeval period, so did Tickhill. By the 16th century, only a hall was occupied on the castle site, but the market and an annual fair on St Lawrence's Day survived. A little trade was gained from its position on the main road to Bawtry. In 1777, a butter cross was erected in the marketplace in an attempt to revive the weekly market, but this ceased in the 1790s.[1]

Strafforth and Tickhill was one of the wapentakes of the West Riding of Yorkshire. The Tickhill Psalter, an outstanding medieval illuminated manuscript was made in the Worksop Priory Nottinghamshire, is currently on display in New York.It is named after John de Tickhill, born locally and who was made Prior of Worksop in the 14th century.

The following records from St Mary's Church, Tickhill are available at the Doncaster Archives:

  • Baptisms 1542–1895
  • Marriages 1538–1910
  • Burials 1537–1901
  • Banns 1798–1838
  • Index: Baptisms 1542–1718, 1771–1839
  • Index: Marriages 1538–1677, 1754–1838
  • Index: Burials 1538–1674, 1771–1855
  • Bishop’s transcripts 1600–1866

1900s

The Tickhill and Wadworth railway station was open from 1910–29. There as been much debate whether to reopen this station.

Research Tips

  • GENUKI on Tickhill. The GENUKI page gives numerous references to local bodies providing genealogical assistance.
  • The FamilySearch wiki on the ecclesiastical parish of Tickhill provides a list of useful resources for the local area.
  • A Vision of Britain through Time on Tickhill.
  • A Vision of Britain through Time also provides links to three maps for what is now South Yorkshire, produced by the United Kingdom Ordnance Survey, illustrating the boundaries between the civil parishes and the rural districts at various dates. These maps all blow up to a scale that will illustrate small villages and large farms or estates.
  • Ordnance Survey West Riding 1888. The "Sanitary Districts (which preceded the rural districts) for the whole of the West Riding.
  • Ordnance Survey West Riding South 1900. The rural and urban districts, not long after their introduction. (the southern part of Bradford, the southern part of Leeds, the southern part of Tadcaster Rural District, the southern part of Selby, Goole Rural District, and all the divisions of Halifax, Huddersfield, Wakefield, Doncaster, Barnsley, Rotherham and Sheffield)
  • Ordnance Survey West Riding 1944. The urban and rural districts of the whole of the West Riding after the revisions of 1935.
This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Tickhill. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.