Place:Horsley, Gloucestershire, England

Watchers
NameHorsley
Alt namesHorseleisource: Domesday Book (1985) p 113
TypeParish, Village
Coordinates51.683°N 2.233°W
Located inGloucestershire, England
See alsoLongtree (hundred), Gloucestershire, Englandhundred of which the parish was a part
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog
source: Family History Library Catalog
source: Family History Library Catalog
source: Family History Library Catalog
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Horsley is a village and civil parish near the small Cotswold town of Nailsworth. It is in Gloucestershire in the South West of England. The origins of the name Horsley are much debated, though it is thought that it originates from "Horse in a field" after the large number of horses kept in fields on its rolling hillside.

A 19th century description

A Vision of Britain through Time provides the following description of Horsley from John Marius Wilson's Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales of 1870-72:

"HORSLEY, a village, a parish, and a sub-district in Stroud district, Gloucester. The village stands under the Cotswolds, 3 miles SW of Minchinhampton, and 5 [miles] S of Stroud [railway] station; was once a market town, and a place of more importance than now; consists chiefly of old houses, irregularly built; and has a post office under Stroud, and a police station.
"The parish includes also the hamlet of Chaseridge, the village of Nailsworth, and the hamlets of Barton-End, Down-End [or Downend], Newmarket, Rockness, Shortwood, Nupp-End, and Walkley-Wood. Acres: 4,082. Real property, exclusive of Nailsworth: £8,545; of which £10 are in quarries. Population in 1851: 2,931; in 1861: 2,558. Houses: 630. The decrease of population was caused by the closing of cloth mills. The property is divided among a few. The manor belongs to Townsend Stephens, Esq. A Tudor manor house, with chapel attached, is at Chavenage. An ancient priory, a cell to St. Martin du Tours, stood near the church; passed to Bruton abbey, to the Dennys, and to the Stephenses; and is now represented by only a gateway. The woollen manufacture, though much declined, is still carried on. The living is a vicarage in the diocese of Gloucester and Bristol. Value: £199. Patron, the Bishop of Gloucester and Bristol. The church is perpendicular English; and consists of nave, transept, and chancel, with a tower. There is a chapel of ease at Shortwood. The [perpetual] curacy of Chaseridge is a separate benefice. There are chapels for Baptists and Wesleyans, an endowed national school, and charities £100.
"The sub-district contains also the parish of Avening. Acres: 8,510. Population: 4,628. Houses: 1,109."


NOTE: The places written in italics have all been redirected here. Down-end or Downend is sometimes known as Downend (near Minchinhampton) or Downend (near Nailsworth).

Registration Districts

Stroud (1837 - 2006)
Gloucestershire (2006 - )

Research Tips

Online sources which may also be helpful:

  • The Victoria History of Gloucestershire chapter on Horseley, available online on the website British History Online.
  • GENUKI gives pointers to other archive sources as well as providing some details on each parish in the county. The emphasis here is on ecclesiastical parishes (useful before 1837)
  • A listing of all the Registration Districts in England and Wales since their introduction in 1837 and tables of the parishes that were part of each district and the time period covered with detailed notes on changes of parish name, mergers, etc. Respect the copyright on this material.
  • The FamilySearch Wiki for Gloucestershire provides a similar but not identical series of webpages to that provided by GENUKI
  • A Vision of Britain through Time has a group of pages of statistical facts for almost every parish in the county
This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Horsley, Gloucestershire. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.