Place:Sevenoaks, Kent, England

Watchers
NameSevenoaks
Alt namesKippingtonsource: Family History Library Catalog
Sevenoaks (town)source: name variation
Sevenoaks (district)source: perhaps Sevenoaks Registration District
Greatnesssource: settlement in parish
Knolesource: manor or estate in parish
Sevenoaks Commonsource: settlement in parish
Wildernessesource: settlement in parish
TypeParish (ancient), Civil parish, Urban district
Coordinates51.267°N 0.2°E
Located inKent, England
See alsoCodsheath Hundred, Kent, Englandancient county division in which it was located
Sevenoaks District, Kent, Englanddistrict municipality in which it was absorbed in 1974
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Sevenoaks is a commuter town situated in western Kent, England, southeast of Charing Cross, on a commuter main line from the capital. The town gives its name to the non-metropolitan Sevenoaks District, of which it is the principal town. Swanley and Edenbridge are also in the District.

The presence of Knole House, a large mansion, led to the earlier settlement becoming a village and in the 13th century a market was established. Sevenoaks became part of the modern communications network when one of the earlier turnpikes was opened in the 18th century; the railway was relatively late in reaching it. It has a large commuting population although the nearby Fort Halstead defence installation is a large local employer. Located to the southeast of the town is Knole Park, within which lies Knole House.

There are several educational establishments in the town, including the independent Sevenoaks School and Knole Academy.

The 2001 census counts approximately 18,588 residents within the Sevenoaks civil parish authority, compared to its population in 1801 of 2,600. The built-up area of the town had a population of 24,987 at the 2011 census.

end of Wikipedia contribution

The built-up area of the town has mainly spread along the main roads. Riverhead to the northwest is a civil parish within Sevenoaks District, other "suburbs" of Sevenoaks (in clockwise order from the north) include Greatness, Wildernesse, Sevenoaks Common, and Kippington [those in italics redirected here].

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

There are few records earlier than the 13th century for the town, when it was given market status. The weekly cattle market was held in Hitchen Hatch Lane and closed in 1999. A food market is held in the centre of town every Saturday. In the Middle Ages two hospitals were provided by religious orders for the care of old or sick people, especially those going on pilgrimage.

Sevenoaks School, at the south end of High Street, is one of the oldest lay foundations in England. It was founded by William Sevenoke in 1432. Sevenoke, a foundling, had been brought up in the town. In later life he became a merchant and served as alderman, sheriff and mayor of London. Founding the school and adjacent almshouses was his thanks to the town. In 1560 it was granted letters patent by Queen Elizabeth I and became known as 'Queen Elizabeth's Grammar School'. It was "for the education of boys and youths in grammar and learning".

In 1456 Thomas Bourchier, Archbishop of Canterbury, purchased the Knole estate and built Knole House, which still dominates the town.

The eponymous oak trees in Knole Park have been replaced several times over the centuries. In 1902 seven oaks were planted on the north side of The Vine cricket ground to commemorate the coronation of King Edward VII. During the Great Storm of 1987, six of those trees were blown down. Their replacements were vandalised, leaving only one standing. There are now eight trees on the site, of varying ages.

Research tips

  • Kent County Council Archive, Local Studies and Museums Service. James Whatman Way, Maidstone, Kent ME14 1LQ. This incorporates the Centre for Kentish Studies in Maidstone and the East Kent Archives Centre near Dover.
  • Canterbury Cathedral Archives see the Archives web pages on the Canterbury Catherdral site.
  • For information on the area around the Medway Towns, have a look at Medway Council's CityArk site.
  • Ordnance Survey Maps of England and Wales - Revised: Kent illustrates the parish boundaries of Kent when rural districts were still in existence and before Greater London came into being. The map publication year is 1931. An earlier map of 1900 may also be useful. The maps blow up to show all the parishes and many of the small villages and hamlets. Maps in this series are now downloadable for personal use.
  • Steve Archer has produced a very useful round-up of the available census records for Kent - and where/from whom they are available.
  • Registration Districts in Kent for the period 1837 to the present. By drilling down through the links you can follow any parish through the registration districts to which it was attached.
  • Bishop's Transcripts for Kent parishes, 1558-1887, can be found on FamilySearch since February 2016
  • The Kent Family History Society and the North West Kent Family History Society are the most dominant, but there are also
This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Sevenoaks. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.