Place:Sedbergh, West Riding of Yorkshire, England

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NameSedbergh
Alt namesSedburghsource: wikipedia alternate spelling
TypeParish, Civil parish
Coordinates54.322°N 2.526°W
Located inWest Riding of Yorkshire, England     ( - 1974)
Also located inCumbria, England     (1974 - )
Yorkshire, England     ( - 1974)
See alsoSedbergh Rural, West Riding of Yorkshire, Englandrural district of which it was a part 1894-1974
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Sedbergh ( or ) is a small town in Cumbria, England. Historically part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, it lies about east of Kendal and about north of Kirkby Lonsdale. The town sits just within the Yorkshire Dales National Park. Sedbergh is at the foot of the Howgill Fells on the north bank of the River Rawthey which joins the River Lune about 2 miles (2 km) below the town.

Sedbergh has a narrow main street lined with shops. From all angles, the hills rising behind the houses can be seen. Until the coming of the Ingleton Branch Line in 1861, these remote places were reachable only by walking over some fairly steep hills. The railway to Sedbergh was closed in 1965.

George Fox, a founder of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers), spoke in St. Andrew's Church (which he called a "steeple house") and on nearby Firbank Fell during his travels in the North of England in 1652. Briggflatts Meeting House was built in 1675. It is the namesake of Basil Bunting's long poem Briggflatts (1966). Sedbergh School is a co-educational boarding school in the town. The distances from Kendal and Kirby Lonsdale are 10 miles (16 km) and 10 miles (16 km) respectively.

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Sedbergh's parish church dedicated to St Andrew dates from the 12th century, though restored periodically since then. There is at least one house in the village dating from the 14th century, and there are the remains of a motte and bailey castle believed to date from Saxon times.

Sedbergh's main industries for many years were farming and the production of woollen garments. Wool was taken to mills where it was turned into yarn from which people in their homes knitted clothing, including hats and socks. The garments were sold by local merchants to, among other places, the coal miners of the North East of England. This trade has long since disappeared. It is remembered at Farfield Mill, just outside the town, where there is an exhibition of weaving equipment, and workshops for a number of artists and crafts workers.

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