Place:Pembrokeshire, Wales

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NamePembrokeshire
Alt namesPembrokesource: Webster's Geographical Dictionary (1988) p 937
Sir Benfrosource: Wikipedia
TypeHistoric county, Principal area
Coordinates51.667°N 4.917°W
Located inWales
Contained Places
County town
Haverfordwest
Inhabited place
Ambleston
Amroth
Angle
Bayvil
Begeli
Caldy Island
Camrose
Cilgerran
Crymych
Dale
Dinas
Fishguard
Gelliswick
Goodwick
Johnston
Laugharne
Letterston
Llanfyrnach
Llanychlwydog
Maenclochog
Manorbier
Mathry
Milford Haven
Mynachlog-ddu
Narberth
Nevern
Newport
Neyland
Pembroke Dock
Pembroke ( 780 - )
Penbryn
Saint Dogmaels
Saundersfoot
Slebech
Solva
Spittal
St David's ( 550 - )
St. Dogwells
Tenby
Tretio
Walwyn's Castle
Wiston ( 1974 - )
Wolf's Castle
Uninhabited hamlet
St. Margaret's Island
Unknown
Bletherston
Bont-faen
Bosheston
Boulston
Brawdy
Bridell
Burton
Caerfarchell
Capel Colman
Carew
Castellan
Castelldwyran
Castlebythe
Castlemartin
Cilrhedyn
Clarbeston
Clydai
Coedcynlas
Cosheston
Crinow
Crunwear
Cuffern
Eglwyswrw
Ford
Forlan
Freystrop
Granston
Grondre
Gumfreston
Hamlet of St. Thomas
Haroldston St. Issells
Haroldston West
Hasguard
Hayscastle
Henry's Moat
Herbrandston
Hill Mountain
Hodgeston
Hubberston
Jeffreston
Jordanston
Lambston
Lamphey
Lawrenni
Little Newcastle
Llan-gan West
Llan-y-cefn
Llanbedr Felffre
Llanddewi Felffre
Llandeilo
Llandeloy
Llandysilio East
Llanfair Nant-gwyn
Llanfair Nant-y-gof
Llanfallteg West
Llanfihangel Penbedw
Llangolman
Llangwm
Llanhywel
Llanllawer
Llanrheithan
Llanrhian
Llanstadwel
Llanstinan
Llantwyd
Llanwnda
Llanychâr
Llawhaden
Llwyn-gwair
Llys-y-frân
Loveston
Ludchurch
Maenordeifi
Marloes
Marnawan
Martletwy
Meline
Minwear
Monington
Monkton
Morfil
Mounton
Moylgrove
Narberth North
Narberth South
Nash
New Moat
Newton North
Newton
Nolton
Penally
Penrhydd
Prendergast
Puncheston
Pwllcrochon
Redberth
Reynalton
Rhos
Rhoscrowdder
Robeston Wathen
Robeston West
Roch
Rosemarket
Rudbaxton
Sardis
Spital
St. Brides
St. Edrens
St. Elvis
St. Florence
St. Ishmaels
St. Issells
St. Lawrence
St. Mary in Liberty
St. Mary
St. Nicholas
St. Petrox
St. Twinells
Stackpole Elidir
Stepaside
Steynton
Talbenni
Templeton
Trefgarn
Upton
Uzmaston
Walton East
Walton West
Warren
Whitchurch
Whitechurch
Williamston
Wolfsdale
Yerbeston
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Pembrokeshire (, or ; ) is a county in the south west of Wales. It borders Carmarthenshire to the east and Ceredigion to the north east. Pembrokeshire County Council's headquarters are in the county town of Haverfordwest.

The county is home to Pembrokeshire Coast National Park, the only coastal national park of its kind in the United Kingdom and one of three national parks in Wales, the others being Snowdonia and Brecon Beacons national parks. Over the years Pembrokeshire's beaches have been awarded 41 Blue Flag Awards (13 in 2011), 47 Green Coast Awards (15 in 2011) and 106 Seaside Awards (31 in 2011. In 2011 it also had 39 beaches recommended by the Marine Conservation Society.

Pembrokeshire's population, according to the UK Census, was 114,131 in 2001 rising to 122,400 by the following census in 2011, an increase of 8.2%.

Much of Pembrokeshire has been English in language and culture for many centuries. The boundary between the English and Welsh speakers is known as the Landsker Line and southern Pembrokeshire is occasionally referred to as Little England beyond Wales.

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Human habitation of the region of Pembrokeshire extends back to 125,000 and 70,000 BCE. By the late Roman Empire period, an Irish tribe known as the Déisi settled in the region between AD 350 and 400, with their realm known as Demetae.

In the post Roman period, the Irish Déisi merged with the local Welsh, with the name of the region evolving into Dyfed, which existed as an independent petty kingdom until its heiress, Elen, married Hywel the Good in AD 904.[1]

Hywel merged Dyfed with his own maternal inheritance of Seisyllwg, forming the new realm of Deheubarth.[1] The region suffered from devastating and relentless Viking raids during the Viking Age, with the Vikings establishing settlements and trading posts at Haverfordwest, Fishguard and Caldey Island.[1]


Dyfed, the region of Pembrokeshire, remained an integral province of Deheubarth but this was contested by invading Normans and Flemings who arrived between 1067 and 1111.[1] The region became known as Pembroke, after the Norman castle built in the Penfro cantref. But Norman/Flemish presence was precarious given the hostility of the native Welsh Princes. In 1136 Prince Owain Gwynedd sought to avenge the execution of his sister the Princess Gwenllian of Deheubarth and her children, with Gwenllian's husband the Prince Rhys swept down from Gwynedd with a formidable army and at Crug Mawr near Cardigan. There they met and destroyed the 3000 strong Norman/Flemish army. The remnants of the Normans fled across the bridge at Cardigan which collapsed and the Teifi river was choked with drowned Men at Arms and horses.

The Norman Marcher Lord Gilbert de Clare was also killed. Owain's brother Cadwallader took de Clares daughter Alice as his wife. Owain incorporated Deheubarth into Gwynedd re-establishing control of the region. Mortally weakened Norman/Flemish influence never fully recovered in West Wales. Princess Gwenllian of Deheubarth is one of the best remembered victims. In 1138 the county of Pembrokeshire was named as a county palatine

The county has long been divided between an English-speaking south (known as "Little England beyond Wales") and a historically more Welsh-speaking north, along a reasonably sharply-defined linguistic border called the Landsker.

The Lord Rhys, Prince of Deheubarth, Princess Gwenllian's son, reestablished Welsh control over much of the region and threatened to retake all of Pembrokeshire, but died in 1197.[1] After Deheubarth was split by a dynastic feud, Llywelyn the Great almost managed to retake the region of Pembroke between 1216 and his death in 1240.[1]

In 1457 Henry Tudor was born at Pembroke Castle and, 28 years later, landing an army not far from his birthplace, he rallied support, marched through Wales to Bosworth field in Leicestershire and defeated the larger army of Richard III. As Henry VII he founded the Tudor dynasty which successfully ruled England until 1603.

The Act of Union of 1536 divided the county into hundreds, which followed with some modifications the lines of the ancient division into cantrefs, which went back to before the Norman conquest. The 1536 hundreds were (clockwise from the north-east): Cilgerran or Kilgerran, Cemais or Kemes, Dewisland or Dewsland, Roose, Castlemartin, Narbeth and Dungleddy or Daugleddau. The Genuki web pages on Pembrokeshire include a list of the parishes within each hundred.


During the First English Civil War (1642-1646) the county gave strong support to the Parliamentary cause, in sharp contrast to the rest of Wales which was staunchly Royalist. In spite of this an incident in Pembrokeshire triggered the opening shots of the Second Civil War when local units of the New Model Army mutinied. Oliver Cromwell defeated the uprising at the Siege of Pembroke in July 1648. In 1649 Cromwell's expeditionary force for Ireland sailed from Milford Haven.

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This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Pembrokeshire. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.